• This first paper in a series describes the design of a study testing whether pre-appearance signatures of solar magnetic active regions were detectable using various tools of local helioseismology. The ultimate goal is to understand flux-emergence mechanisms by setting observational constraints on pre-appearance subsurface changes, for comparison with results from simulation efforts. This first paper provides details of the data selection and preparation of the samples, each containing over 100 members, of two populations: regions on the Sun that produced a numbered NOAA active region, and a "control" sample of areas that did not. The seismology is performed on data from the GONG network; accompanying magnetic data from SOHO/MDI are used for co-temporal analysis of the surface magnetic field. Samples are drawn from 2001 -- 2007, and each target is analyzed for 27.7 hr prior to an objectively determined time of emergence. The results of two analysis approaches are published separately: one based on averages of the seismology- and magnetic-derived signals over the samples, another based on Discriminant Analysis of these signals, for a statistical test of detectable differences between the two populations. We include here descriptions of a new potential-field calculation approach and the algorithm for matching sample distributions over multiple variables. We describe known sources of bias and the approaches used to mitigate them. We also describe unexpected bias sources uncovered during the course of the study and include a discussion of refinements that should be included in future work on this topic.
  • Local helioseismology provides unique information about the subsurface structure and dynamics of sunspots and active regions. However, because of complexity of sunspot regions local helioseismology diagnostics require careful analysis of systematic uncertainties and physical interpretation of the inversion results. We present new results of comparison of the ring-diagram analysis and time-distance helioseismology for active region NOAA 9787, for which a previous comparison showed significant differences in the subsurface sound-speed structure, and discuss systematic uncertainties of the measurements and inversions. Our results show that both the ring-diagram and time-distance techniques give qualitatively similar results, revealing a characteristic two-layer seismic sound-speed structure consistent with the results for other active regions. However, a quantitative comparison of the inversion results is not straightforward. It must take into account differences in the sensitivity, spatial resolution and the averaging kernels. In particular, because of the acoustic power suppression, the contribution of the sunspot seismic structure to the ring-diagram signal can be substantially reduced. We show that taking into account this effect reduces the difference in the depth of transition between the negative and positive sound-speed variations inferred by these methods. Further detailed analysis of the sensitivity, resolution and averaging properties of the local helioseismology methods is necessary for consolidation of the inversion results. It seems to be important that both methods indicate that the seismic structure of sunspots is rather deep and extends to at least 20 Mm below the surface, putting constraints on theoretical models of sunspots.