• We combine state-of-the-art models for the production of stellar radiation and its transfer through the interstellar medium (ISM) to investigate ultraviolet-line diagnostics of stars, the ionized and the neutral ISM in star-forming galaxies. We start by assessing the reliability of our stellar population synthesis modelling by fitting absorption-line indices in the ISM-free ultraviolet spectra of 10 Large-Magellanic-Cloud clusters. In doing so, we find that neglecting stochastic sampling of the stellar initial mass function in these young ($\sim10$-100 Myr), low-mass clusters affects negligibly ultraviolet-based age and metallicity estimates but can lead to significant overestimates of stellar mass. Then, we proceed and develop a simple approach, based on an idealized description of the main features of the ISM, to compute in a physically consistent way the combined influence of nebular emission and interstellar absorption on ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies. Our model accounts for the transfer of radiation through the ionized interiors and outer neutral envelopes of short-lived stellar birth clouds, as well as for radiative transfer through a diffuse intercloud medium. We use this approach to explore the entangled signatures of stars, the ionized and the neutral ISM in ultraviolet spectra of star-forming galaxies. We find that, aside from a few notable exceptions, most standard ultraviolet indices defined in the spectra of ISM-free stellar populations are prone to significant contamination by the ISM, which increases with metallicity. We also identify several nebular-emission and interstellar-absorption features, which stand out as particularly clean tracers of the different phases of the ISM.
  • The gas kinetic temperature ($T_K$) of various interstellar environments is often inferred from observations that can deduce level populations of atoms, ions, or molecules using spectral line observations; H I 21 cm is perhaps the most widely used with a long history. Usually the H I 21 cm line is assumed to be in thermal equilibrium and the populations are given by the Boltzmann distribution. A variety of processes, many involving Lyman alpha ($Ly\alpha$), can affect the 21 cm line. Here we show how this is treated in the spectral simulation code Cloudy, and present numerical simulations of environments where this temperature indicator is used, with a detailed treatment of the physical processes that determine level populations within $H^0$. We discuss situations where this temperature indicator traces $T_K$, cases where they fail, as well as the effects of $Ly\alpha$ pumping on the 21 cm spin temperature. We also show that the $Ly\alpha$ excitation temperature rarely traces the gas kinetic temperature.
  • We present HST spectroscopy for 45 cataclysmic variables (CVs), observed with HST/COS and HST/STIS. For 36 CVs, the white dwarf is recognisable through its broad Ly$\alpha$ absorption profile and we measure the white dwarf effective temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}}$) by fitting the HST data assuming $\log\,g=8.35$, which corresponds to the average mass for CV white dwarfs ($\simeq\,0.8\,\mathrm{M}_\odot$). Our results nearly double the number of CV white dwarfs with an accurate temperature measurement. We find that CVs above the period gap have, on average, higher temperatures ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 23\,000\,$K) and exhibit much more scatter compared to those below the gap ($\langle T_{\mathrm{eff}} \rangle \simeq 15\,000\,$K). While this behaviour broadly agrees with theoretical predictions, some discrepancies are present: (i) all our new measurements above the gap are characterised by lower temperatures ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 16\,000 - 26\,000\,$K) than predicted by the present day CV population models ($T_{\mathrm{eff}} \simeq 38\,000 - 43\,000\,$K); (ii) our results below the gap are not clustered in the predicted narrow track and exhibit in particular a relatively large spread near the period minimum, which may point to some shortcomings in the CV evolutionary models. Finally, in the standard model of CV evolution, reaching the minimum period, CVs are expected to evolve back towards longer periods with mean accretion rates $\dot{M}\lesssim 2 \times 10^{-11}\,\mathrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$, corresponding to $T_\mathrm{eff}\lesssim 11\,500\,$K. We do not unambiguously identify any such system in our survey, suggesting that this major component of the predicted CV population still remains elusive to observations.
  • To calculate realistic models of objects with Ni in their atmospheres, accurate atomic data for the relevant ionization stages needs to be included in model atmosphere calculations. In the context of white dwarf stars, we investigate the effect of changing the Ni {\sc iv}-{\sc vi} bound-bound and bound-free atomic data has on model atmosphere calculations. Models including PICS calculated with {\sc autostructure} show significant flux attenuation of up to $\sim 80$\% shortward of 180\AA\, in the EUV region compared to a model using hydrogenic PICS. Comparatively, models including a larger set of Ni transitions left the EUV, UV, and optical continua unaffected. We use models calculated with permutations of this atomic data to test for potential changes to measured metal abundances of the hot DA white dwarf G191-B2B. Models including {\sc autostructure} PICS were found to change the abundances of N and O by as much as $\sim 22$\% compared to models using hydrogenic PICS, but heavier species were relatively unaffected. Models including {\sc autostructure} PICS caused the abundances of N/O {\sc iv} and {\sc v} to diverge. This is because the increased opacity in the {\sc autostructure} PICS model causes these charge states to form higher in the atmosphere, moreso for N/O {\sc v}. Models using an extended line list caused significant changes to the Ni {\sc iv}-{\sc v} abundances. While both PICS and an extended line list cause changes in both synthetic spectra and measured abundances, the biggest changes are caused by using {\sc autostructure} PICS for Ni.
  • Non-radial pulsations have been identified in a number of accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. These stars offer insight into the excitation of pulsation modes in atmospheres with mixed compositions of hydrogen, helium, and metals, and the response of these modes to changes in the white dwarf temperature. Among all pulsating cataclysmic variable white dwarfs, GW Librae stands out by having a well-established observational record of three independent pulsation modes that disappeared when the white dwarf temperature rose dramatically following its 2007 accretion outburst. Our analysis of HST ultraviolet spectroscopy taken in 2002, 2010 and 2011, showed that pulsations produce variations in the white dwarf effective temperature as predicted by theory. Additionally in May~2013, we obtained new HST/COS ultraviolet observations that displayed unexpected behaviour: besides showing variability at ~275s, which is close to the post-outburst pulsations detected with HST in 2010 and 2011, the white dwarf exhibits high-amplitude variability on a ~4.4h time-scale. We demonstrate that this variability is produced by an increase of the temperature of a region on white dwarf covering up to ~30 per cent of the visible white dwarf surface. We argue against a short-lived accretion episode as the explanation of such heating, and discuss this event in the context of non-radial pulsations on a rapidly rotating star
  • The presence of a white dwarf in a resolved binary system, such as Sirius, provides an opportunity to combine dynamical information about the masses, from astrometry and spectroscopy, with a gravitational red-shift measurement and spectrophotometry of the white dwarf atmosphere to provide a test of theoretical mass-radius relations of unprecedented accuracy. We demonstrated this with the first Balmer line spectrum of Sirius B to be obtained free of contamination from the primary, with STIS on HST. However, we also found an unexplained discrepancy between the spectroscopic and gravitational red-shift mass determinations. With the recovery of STIS, we have been able to revisit our observations of Sirius B with an improved observation strategy designed to reduce systematic errors on the gravitational red-shift measurement. We provide a preliminary report on the refined precision of the Sirius B mass-radius measurements and the extension of this technique to a larger sample of white dwarfs in resolved binaries. Together these data can provide accurate mass and radius determinations capable of testing the theoretical mass-radius relation and distinguishing between possible structural models.
  • The aim of this study is to analyse and determine elemental abundances for a large sample of distant B stars in the outer Galactic disk in order to constrain the chemical distribution of the Galactic disk and models of chemical evolution of the Galaxy. Here, we present preliminary results on a few stars along with the adopted methodology based on securing simultaneous O and Si ionization equilibria with consistent NLTE model atmospheres.
  • We present a series of systematic abundance measurements for 89 hydrogen atmosphere (DA-type) white dwarfs with temperatures spanning 16000-77000K drawn from the FUSE spectral archive. This is the largest study to date of white dwarfs where radiative forces are significant, exceeding our earlier work, based mainly on IUE and HST data, by a factor three. Using heavy element blanketed non-LTE stellar atmosphere calculations, we have addressed the heavy element abundance patterns making completely objective measurements of abundance values and their error ranges using a \c{hi}2 fitting technique. We are able to establish the broad range of abundances seen in a given temperature range and establish the incidence of stars which appear, in the optical, to be atmospherically devoid of any material other than H. We compare the observed abundances to predictions of radiative levitation calculations, revealing little agreement. We propose that the supply of heavy elements is accreted from external sources rather than being intrinsic to the star. These elements are then retained in the white dwarf atmospheres by radiative levitation, a model that can explain both the diversity of measured abundances for stars of similar temperature and gravity, including cases with apparently pure H envelopes, and the presence of photospheric metals at temperatures where radiative levitation is no longer effective.
  • We present IRIS, a new generic three-dimensional (3D) spectral radiative transfer code that generates synthetic spectra, or images. It can be used as a diagnostic tool for comparison with astrophysical observations or laboratory astrophysics experiments. We have developed a 3D short-characteristic solver that works with a 3D nonuniform Cartesian grid. We have implemented a piecewise cubic, locally monotonic, interpolation technique that dramatically reduces the numerical diffusion effect. The code takes into account the velocity gradient effect resulting in gradual Doppler shifts of photon frequencies and subsequent alterations of spectral line profiles. It can also handle periodic boundary conditions. This first version of the code assumes Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE) and no scattering. The opacities and source functions are specified by the user. In the near future, the capabilities of IRIS will be extended to allow for non-LTE and scattering modeling. IRIS has been validated through a number of tests. We provide the results for the most relevant ones, in particular a searchlight beam test, a comparison with a 1D plane-parallel model, and a test of the velocity gradient effect. IRIS is a generic code to address a wide variety of astrophysical issues applied to different objects or structures, such as accretion shocks, jets in young stellar objects, stellar atmospheres, exoplanet atmospheres, accretion disks, rotating stellar winds, cosmological structures. It can also be applied to model laboratory astrophysics experiments, such as radiative shocks produced with high power lasers.
  • We present an online catalog containing spectra and supporting information for cataclysmic variables that have been observed with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). For each object in the catalog we list some of the basic system parameters such as (RA,Dec), period, inclination, white dwarf mass, as well as information on the available FUSE spectra: data ID, observation date and time, and exposure time. In addition, we provide parameters needed for the analysis of the FUSE spectra such as the reddening E(B-V), distance, and state (high, low, intermediate) of the system at the time it was observed. For some of these spectra we have carried out model fits to the continuum with synthetic stellar and/or disk spectra using the codes TLUSTY and SYNSPEC. We provide the parameters obtained from these model fits; this includes the white dwarf temperature, gravity, projected rotational velocity and elemental abundances of C, Si, S and N, together with the disk mass accretion rate, the resulting inclination and model-derived distance (when unknown). For each object one or more figures are provided (as gif files) with line identification and model fit(s) when available. The FUSE spectra as well as the synthetic spectra are directly available for download as ascii tables. References are provided for each object as well as for the model fits. In this article we present 36 objects, and additional ones will be added to the online catalog in the future. In addition to cataclysmic variables, we also include a few related objects, such as a wind accreting white dwarf, a pre-cataclysmic variable and some symbiotics.
  • The internal heat loss, or cooling, of a planet determines its structure and evolution. We study the effects of irradiation, metallicity of the atmosphere, heat redistribution, stratospheres, and the depth where the heat redistribution takes place on the atmospheric structure, the core entropy, and subsequently on the cooling of the interior of the planet. We address in a consistent fashion the coupling between the day and the night sides of a planet by means of model atmosphere calculations with heat redistribution. We assume that strong convection leads to the same entropy on the day and night sides and that gravity is the same on both hemispheres. We argue that the core cooling rates from the two hemispheres of a strongly irradiated planet may not be the same and that the difference depends on several important parameters. If the day-night heat redistribution is very efficient or if it takes place at the large optical depth, then the day-side and the night-side cooling may be comparable. However, if the day-night heat transport is not efficient or if it takes place at a shallow optical depth then there can be a large difference between the day- and the night-side cooling and the night side will cool more efficiently. If stellar irradiation becomes stronger, e.g. owing to stellar evolution or migration, cooling from both the day and the night sides is reduced. Enhanced metallicity of the atmosphere would act as an added "blanket" and reduces both the day- and the night-side cooling. However, a stratosphere on the planetary day side can enhance day-side cooling since its opacity acts as a "sunshade" that screens the stellar irradiation. These effects may also influence the well-known gravity darkening and bolometric albedo effects in interacting binaries, especially for strongly irradiated cold components.
  • The importance to stellar evolution of understanding the metal abundances in hot white dwarfs is well known. Previous work has found the hot DA white dwarfs REJ 1032+532, REJ 1614-085 and GD 659 to have highly abundant, stratified photospheric nitrogen, due to the narrow absorption line profiles of the FUV N V doublet and the lack of EUV continuum absorption. A preliminary analysis of the extremely narrow, deep line profiles of the photospheric metal absorption features of PG 0948+534 suggested a similar photospheric metal configuration. However, other studies have found REJ 1032+532, REJ 1614-085 and GD 659 can be well described by homogeneous models, with nitrogen abundances more in keeping with those of white dwarfs with higher effective temperatures. Here, a re-analysis of the nitrogen absorption features seen in REJ 1032+532, REJ 1614-085 and GD 659 is presented, with the aim of better understanding the structure of these stars, to test which models better represent the observed data and apply the results to the line profiles seen in PG 0948+534. A degeneracy is seen in the modelling of the nitrogen absorption line profiles of REJ 1032+532, REJ 1614-085 and GD 659, with low abundance, homogeneously distributed nitrogen models most likely being a better representation of the observed data. In PG 0948+534, no such degeneracy is seen, and the enigmatically deep line profiles could not be modelled satisfactorially.
  • We present non-LTE oxygen abundances for a sample of B stars in the Orion association. The abundance calculations included non-LTE line formation and used fully blanketed non-LTE model atmospheres. The stellar parameters were the same as adopted in the previous study by Cunha & Lambert (1994). We find that the young Orion stars in this sample of 10 stars are described by a single oxygen abundance with an average value of A(O)=8.78 and a small dispersion of +/- 0.05 dex, which is of the order of the uncertainties in the analysis. This average oxygen abundance compares well with the average oxygen abundance obtained previously in Cunha & Lambert (1994): A(O) = 8.72 +/- 0.13 although this earlier study, based upon non-blanketed model atmospheres in LTE, displayed larger scatter. Small scatter of chemical abundances in Orion B stars had also been found in our previous studies for neon and argon; all based on the same effective temperature scale. The derived oxygen abundance distribution for the Orion association compares well with other results for the oxygen abundance in the solar neighborhood.
  • The spectral energy distributions for pure-hydrogen (DA) hot white dwarfs can be accurately predicted by model atmospheres. This makes it possible to define spectrophotometric calibrators by scaling the theoretical spectral shapes with broad-band photometric observations -- a strategy successfully exploited for the spectrographs onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) using three primary DA standards. Absolute fluxes for non-DA secondary standards, introduced to increase the density of calibrators in the sky, need to be referred to the primary standards, but a far better solution would be to employ a network of DA stars scattered throughout the sky. We search for blue objects in the sixth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and fit DA model fluxes to identify suitable candidates. Reddening needs to be considered in the analysis of the hottest and therefore more distant stars. We propose a list of nine pure-hydrogen white dwarfs with absolute fluxes with estimated uncertainties below 3%, including four objects with estimated errors <2%, as candidates for spectrophotometric standards in the range 14<g<18, and provide model-based fluxes scaled to match the SDSS broad-band fluxes for each. We apply the same method to the three HST DA standards, linking the zero point of their absolute fluxes to ugr magnitudes transformed from photometry obtained with the USNO 1-m telescope. For these stars we estimate uncertainties of <1% in the optical, finding good consistency with the fluxes adopted for HST calibration.
  • We present the results of a photometric and spectroscopic study of the white dwarf candidate members of the intermediate age open clusters NGC3532 and NGC2287. Of the nine objects investigated, it is determined that six are probable members of the clusters, four in NGC3532 and two in NGC2287. For these six white dwarfs we use our estimates of their cooling times together with the cluster ages to constrain the lifetimes and masses of their progenitor stars. We examine the location of these objects in initial mass-final mass space and find that they now provide no evidence for substantial scatter in initial mass-final mass relation as suggested by previous investigations. Instead, we demonstrate that, when combined with current data from other solar metalicity open clusters and the Sirius binary system, they hint at an IFMR that is steeper in the initial mass range 3M$_{\odot}$$\simless$M$_{\rm init}$$\simless$4M$_{\odot}$ than at progenitor masses immediately lower and higher than this. This form is generally consistent with the predictions of stellar evolutionary models and can aid population synthesis models in reproducing the relatively sharp drop observed at the high mass end of the main peak in the mass distribution of white dwarfs.
  • White dwarf spectra have been widely used as a calibration source for X-ray and EUV instruments. The in-flight effective area calibration of the reflection grating spectrometers (RGS) of XMM-Newton depend upon the availability of reliable calibration sources. We investigate how well these white dwarf spectra can be used as standard candles at the lowest X-ray energies in order to gauge the absolute effective area scale of X-ray instruments. We calculate a grid of model atmospheres for Sirius B and HZ 43A, and adjust the parameters using several constraints until the ratio of the spectra of both stars agrees with the ratio as observed by the low energy transmission grating spectrometer (LETGS) of Chandra. This ratio is independent of any errors in the effective area of the LETGS. We find that we can constrain the absolute X-ray spectrum of both stars with better than 5 % accuracy. The best-fit model for both stars is close to a pure hydrogen atmosphere, and we put tight limits to the amount of helium or the thickness of a hydrogen layer in both stars. Our upper limit to the helium abundance in Sirius B is 4 times below the previous detection based on EUVE data. We also find that our results are sensitive to the adopted cut-off in the Lyman pseudo-continuum opacity in Sirius B. We get best agreement with a long wavelength cut-off. White dwarf model atmospheres can be used to derive the effective area of X-ray spectrometers in the lowest energy band. An accuracy of 3-4 % in the absolute effective area can be achieved.
  • Modeling the variability of the solar spectral irradiance is a key factor for understanding the solar influence on the climate of the Earth. As a first step to calculating the solar spectral irradiance variations we reproduce the solar spectrum for the quiet Sun over a broad wavelength range with an emphasis on the UV. We introduce the radiative transfer code COSI which calculates solar synthetic spectra under conditions of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE). A self-consistent simultaneous solution of the radiative transfer and the statistical equation for the level populations guarantees that the correct physics is considered for wavelength regions where the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) breaks down. The new concept of iterated opacity distribution functions (NLTE-ODFs), through which all line opacities are included in the NLTE radiative transfer calculation, is presented. We show that it is essential to include the line opacities in the radiative transfer to reproduce the solar spectrum in the UV. Through the implemented scheme of NLTE-ODFs the COSI code is successful in reproducing the spectral energy distribution of the quiet Sun.
  • We calculate a new suite of albedo models for close-in extrasolar giant planets and compare with the recent stringent upper limit for HD 209458b of Rowe et al. using MOST. We find that all models without scattering clouds are consistent with this optical limit. We explore the dependence on wavelength and waveband, metallicity, the degree of heat redistribution, and the possible presence of thermal inversions and find a rich diversity of behaviors. Measurements of transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at short wavelengths by MOST, Kepler, and CoRoT, as well as by proposed dedicated multi-band missions, can complement measurements in the near- and mid-IR using {\it Spitzer} and JWST. Collectively, such measurements can help determine metallicity, compositions, atmospheric temperatures, and the cause of thermal inversions (when they arise) for EGPs with a broad range of radii, masses, degrees of stellar insolation, and ages. With this paper, we reappraise and highlight the diagnostic potential of albedo measurements of hot EGPs shortward of $\sim$1.3 $\mu$m.
  • We present a synthetic spectral analysis of Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) spectra of 5 dwarf novae above and below the period gap during quiescence. We use our synthetic spectral code, including options for the treatment of the hydrogen quasi-molecular satellite lines (for low temperature stellar atmospheres), NLTE approximation (for high temperature stellar atmospheres), and for one system (RU Peg) we model the interstellar medium (ISM) molecular and atomic hydrogen lines. In all the systems presented here the FUV flux continuum is due to the WD. These spectra also exhibit some broad emission lines. In this work we confirm some of the previous FUV analysis results but we also present new results. For 4 systems we combine the FUSE and STIS spectra to cover a larger wavelength range and to improve the spectral fit. This work is part of our broader HST archival research program, in which we aim to provide accurate system parameters for cataclysmic variables above and below the period gap by combining FUSE and HST FUV spectra.
  • We present the results of a synthetic spectral analysis of HST STIS spectra of five long period dwarf novae obtained during their quiescence to determine the properties of their white dwarfs which are little known for systems above the CV period gap. The five systems, TU Men, BD Pav, SS Aur, TT Crt, and V442 Cen were observed as part of an HST Snapshot project. The spectra are described and fitted with combinations of white dwarf photospheres and accretion disks. We provide evidence that the white dwarfs in all five systems are at least partially exposed. We discuss the evolutionary implications of our model fitting results and compare these dwarf novae to previously analyzed FUV spectra of other dwarf novae above the period gap. The dispersion in CV WD temperatures above the period gap is substantially greater than one finds below the period gap where there is a surprisingly narrow dispersion in temperatures around 15,000K. There appears to be a larger spread of surface temperatures in dwarf novae above the period than is seen below the gap.
  • We present theoretical atmosphere, spectral, and light-curve models for extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) undergoing strong irradiation for which {\it Spitzer} planet/star contrast ratios or light curves have been published (circa June 2007). These include HD 209458b, HD 189733b, TrES-1, HD 149026b, HD 179949b, and $\upsilon$ And b. By comparing models with data, we find that a number of EGP atmospheres experience thermal inversions and have stratospheres. This is particularly true for HD 209458b, HD 149026b, and $\upsilon$ And b. This finding translates into qualitative changes in the planet/star contrast ratios at secondary eclipse and in close-in EGP orbital light curves. Moreover, the presence of atmospheric water in abundance is fully consistent with all the {\it Spitzer} data for the measured planets. For planets with stratospheres, water absorption features invert into emission features and mid-infrared fluxes can be enhanced by a factor of two. In addition, the character of near-infrared planetary spectra can be radically altered. We derive a correlation between the importance of such stratospheres and the stellar flux on the planet, suggesting that close-in EGPs bifurcate into two groups: those with and without stratospheres. From the finding that TrES-1 shows no signs of a stratosphere, while HD 209458b does, we estimate the magnitude of this stellar flux breakpoint. We find that the heat redistribution parameter, P$_n$, for the family of close-in EGPs assumes values from $\sim$0.1 to $\sim$0.4. This paper provides a broad theoretical context for the future direct characterization of EGPs in tight orbits around their illuminating stars.
  • We calculate the theoretical evolution of the radii of all fourteen of the known transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) for a variety of assumptions concerning atmospheric opacity, dense inner core masses, and possible internal power sources. We incorporate the effects of stellar irradiation and customize such effects for each EGP and star. Looking collectively at the family as a whole, we find that there are in fact two radius anomalies to be explained. Not only are the radii of a subset of the known transiting EGPs larger than expected from previous theory, but many of the other objects are smaller than the default theory would allow. We suggest that the larger EGPs can be explained by invoking enhanced atmospheric opacities that naturally retain internal heat. This explanation might obviate the necessity for an extra internal power source. We explain the smaller radii by the presence in perhaps all the known transiting EGPs of dense cores, such as have been inferred for Saturn and Jupiter. Importantly, we derive a rough correlation between the masses of our "best-fit" cores and the stellar metallicity that seems to buttress the core-accretion model of their formation. Though many caveats and uncertainties remain, the resulting comprehensive theory that incorporates enhanced-opacity atmospheres and dense cores is in reasonable accord with all the current structural data for the known transiting giant planets.
  • We have created a general methodology for calculating the wavelength-dependent light curves of close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) as they traverse their orbits. Focussing on the transiting EGPs HD189733b, TrES-1, and HD209458b, we calculate planet/star flux ratios during secondary eclipse and compare them with the Spitzer data points obtained so far in the mid-infrared. We introduce a simple parametrization for the redistribution of heat to the planet's nightside, derive constraints on this parameter (P_n), and provide a general set of predictions for planet/star contrast ratios as a function of wavelength, model, and phase. Moreover, we calculate average dayside and nightside atmospheric temperature/pressure profiles for each transiting planet/P_n pair with which existing and anticipated Spitzer data can be used to probe the atmospheric thermal structure of severely irradiated EGPs. We find that the baseline models do a good job of fitting the current secondary eclipse dataset, but that the Spitzer error bars are not yet small enough to discriminate cleanly between all the various possibilities.
  • The observed mass function for all known extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) varies approximately as M^{-1} for mass M between 0.2 Jupiter masses (M_J) and 5 M_J. In order to study evaporation effects for highly-irradiated EGPs in this mass range, we have constructed an observational mass function for a subset of EGPs in the same mass range but with orbital radii <0.07 AU. Surprisingly, the mass function for such highly-irradiated EGPs agrees quantitatively with the M^{-1} law, implying that the mass function for EGPs is preserved despite migration to small orbital radii. Unless there is a remarkable compensation of mass-dependent orbital migration for mass-dependent evaporation, this result places a constraint on orbital migration models and rules out the most extreme mass loss rates in the literature. A theory that predicts more moderate mass loss gives a mass function that is closer to observed statistics but still disagrees for M < 1 M_J.
  • We have obtained FUSE and HST/STIS time-resolved spectroscopy of the polar AM Herculis during a deep low state. The spectra are entirely dominated by the emission of the white dwarf. Both the far-ultraviolet (FUV) flux as well as the spectral shape vary substantially over the orbital period, with maximum flux occurring at the same phase as during the high state. The variations are due to the presence of a hot spot on the white dwarf, which we model quantitatively. The white dwarf parameters can be determined from a spectral fit to the faint phase data, when the hot spot is self-eclipsed. Adopting the distance of 79+8-6pc determined by Thorstensen, we find an effective temperature of 19800+-700K and a mass of Mwd=0.78+0.12-0.17Msun. The hot spot has a lower temperature than during the high state, ~34000-40000K, but covers a similar area, ~10% of the white dwarf surface. Low state FUSE and STIS spectra taken during four different epochs in 2002/3 show no variation of the FUV flux level or spectral shape, implying that the white dwarf temperature and the hot spot temperature, size, and location do not depend on the amount of time the system has spent in the low state. Possible explanations are ongoing accretion at a low level, or deep heating, both alternatives have some weaknesses that we discuss. No photospheric metal absorption lines are detected in the FUSE and STIS spectra, suggesting that the average metal abundances in the white dwarf atmosphere are lower than 1e-3 times their solar values.