• We derive the low redshift galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF), inclusive of dust corrections, for the equatorial Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) dataset covering 180 deg$^2$. We construct the mass function using a density-corrected maximum volume method, using masses corrected for the impact of optically thick and thin dust. We explore the galactic bivariate brightness plane ($M_\star-\mu$), demonstrating that surface brightness effects do not systematically bias our mass function measurement above 10$^{7.5}$ M$_{\odot}$. The galaxy distribution in the $M-\mu$-plane appears well bounded, indicating that no substantial population of massive but diffuse or highly compact galaxies are systematically missed due to the GAMA selection criteria. The GSMF is {fit with} a double Schechter function, with $\mathcal M^\star=10^{10.78\pm0.01\pm0.20}M_\odot$, $\phi^\star_1=(2.93\pm0.40)\times10^{-3}h_{70}^3$Mpc$^{-3}$, $\alpha_1=-0.62\pm0.03\pm0.15$, $\phi^\star_2=(0.63\pm0.10)\times10^{-3}h_{70}^3$Mpc$^{-3}$, and $\alpha_2=-1.50\pm0.01\pm0.15$. We find the equivalent faint end slope as previously estimated using the GAMA-I sample, although we find a higher value of $\mathcal M^\star$. Using the full GAMA-II sample, we are able to fit the mass function to masses as low as $10^{7.5}$ $M_\odot$, and assess limits to $10^{6.5}$ $M_\odot$. Combining GAMA-II with data from G10-COSMOS we are able to comment qualitatively on the shape of the GSMF down to masses as low as $10^{6}$ $M_\odot$. Beyond the well known upturn seen in the GSMF at $10^{9.5}$ the distribution appears to maintain a single power-law slope from $10^9$ to $10^{6.5}$. We calculate the stellar mass density parameter given our best-estimate GSMF, finding $\Omega_\star= 1.66^{+0.24}_{-0.23}\pm0.97 h^{-1}_{70} \times 10^{-3}$, inclusive of random and systematic uncertainties.
  • We present a robust calibration of the 1.4GHz radio continuum star formation rate (SFR) using a combination of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey. We identify individually detected 1.4GHz GAMA-FIRST sources and use a late-type, non-AGN, volume-limited sample from GAMA to produce stellar mass-selected samples. The latter are then combined to produce FIRST-stacked images. This extends the robust parametrisation of the 1.4GHz-SFR relation to faint luminosities. For both the individually detected galaxies and our stacked samples, we compare 1.4GHz luminosity to SFRs derived from GAMA to determine a new 1.4GHz luminosity-to-SFR relation with well constrained slope and normalisation. For the first time, we produce the radio SFR-M* relation over 2 decades in stellar mass, and find that our new calibration is robust, and produces a SFR-M* relation which is consistent with all other GAMA SFR methods. Finally, using our new 1.4GHz luminosity-to-SFR calibration we make predictions for the number of star-forming GAMA sources which are likely to be detected in the upcoming ASKAP surveys, EMU and DINGO.
  • We investigate the contentious issue of the presence, or lack thereof, of satellites mass segregation in galaxy groups using the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, the GALFORM semi-analytic and the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulation catalogues of galaxy groups. We select groups with halo mass $12 \leqslant \log(M_{\text{halo}}/h^{-1}M_\odot) <14.5$ and redshift $z \leqslant 0.32$ and probe the radial distribution of stellar mass out to twice the group virial radius. All the samples are carefully constructed to be complete in stellar mass at each redshift range and efforts are made to regularise the analysis for all the data. Our study shows negligible mass segregation in galaxy group environments with absolute gradients of $\lesssim0.08$ dex and also shows a lack of any redshift evolution. Moreover, we find that our results at least for the GAMA data are robust to different halo mass and group centre estimates. Furthermore, the EAGLE data allows us to probe much fainter luminosities ($r$-band magnitude of 22) as well as investigate the three-dimensional spatial distribution with intrinsic halo properties, beyond what the current observational data can offer. In both cases we find that the fainter EAGLE data show a very mild spatial mass segregation at $z \leqslant 0.22$, which is again not apparent at higher redshift. Interestingly, our results are in contrast to some earlier findings using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We investigate the source of the disagreement and suggest that subtle differences between the group finding algorithms could be the root cause.
  • We report on a search for new low-surface-brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data within the GAMA equatorial fields. The search method consisted of masking objects detected with SDSS photo, combining gri images weighted to maximise the expected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and smoothing the images. The processed images were then run through a detection algorithm that finds all pixels above a set threshold and groups them based on their proximity to one another. The list of detections was cleaned of contaminants such as diffraction spikes and the faint wings of masked objects. From these, selecting potentially the brightest in terms of total flux, a list of 343 LSBGs was produced having been confirmed using VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) imaging. The photometry of this sample was refined using the deeper VIKING Z band as the aperture-defining band. Measuring their $g-i$ and $J-K$ colours shows that most are consistent with being at redshifts less than 0.2. The photometry is carried out using an AUTO aperture for each detection giving surface brightnesses of $\mu_{r} \ge 25 \, \mathrm{mag} \, \mathrm{arcsec}^{-2}$ and magnitudes of $r > 19.8$ mag. None of these galaxies are bright enough to be within the GAMA main survey limit but could be part of future deeper surveys to measure the low-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function.
  • The evolution of galaxy cluster counts is a powerful probe of several fundamental cosmological parameters. A number of recent studies using this probe have claimed tension with the cosmology preferred by the analysis of the Planck primary CMB data, in the sense that there are fewer clusters observed than predicted based on the primary CMB cosmology. One possible resolution to this problem is systematic errors in the absolute halo mass calibration in cluster studies, which is required to convert the standard theoretical prediction (the halo mass function) into counts as a function of the observable (e.g., X-ray luminosity, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich flux, optical richness). Here we propose an alternative strategy, which is to directly compare predicted and observed cluster counts as a function of the one-dimensional velocity dispersion of the cluster galaxies. We argue that the velocity dispersion of groups/clusters can be theoretically predicted as robustly as mass but, unlike mass, it can also be directly observed, thus circumventing the main systematic bias in traditional cluster counts studies. With the aid of the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we demonstrate the potential of the velocity dispersion counts for discriminating even similar $\Lambda$CDM models. These predictions can be compared with the results from existing redshift surveys such as the highly-complete Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, and upcoming wide-field spectroscopic surveys such as the Wide Area Vista Extragalactic Survey (WAVES) and the Dark Energy Survey Instrument (DESI).
  • We compare common star-formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the GAMA equatorial fields (around 160 sq. deg.), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared (FIR) and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from H-ATLAS, and Halpha spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope beta (SFRUV,corr), Halpha line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRHalpha,corr), and the combination of UV and IR emission (SFRUV+IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV,corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating IRX (i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Halpha (derived from BD) against beta. However, beta on its own is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass, z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Halpha equivalent width (EW) or Sersic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX vs beta correlation, when compared to SFRUV+IR, the beta-corrected SFRUV,corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.
  • This paper is the second in a pair of articles presenting data release 1 (DR1) of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS), the largest single open-time key project carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory. The H-ATLAS is a wide-area imaging survey carried out in five photometric bands at 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500$\mu$m covering a total area of 600deg$^2$. In this paper we describe the identification of optical counterparts to submillimetre sources in DR1, comprising an area of 161 deg$^2$ over three equatorial fields of roughly 12$^\circ$x4.5$^\circ$ centred at 9$^h$, 12$^h$ and 14.5$^h$ respectively. Of all the H-ATLAS fields, the equatorial regions benefit from the greatest overlap with current multi-wavelength surveys spanning ultraviolet (UV) to mid-infrared regimes, as well as extensive spectroscopic coverage. We use a likelihood-ratio technique to identify SDSS counterparts at r<22.4 for 250-$\mu$m-selected sources detected at $\geq$ 4$\sigma$ ($\approx$28mJy). We find `reliable' counterparts (reliability R$\geq$0.8) for 44,835 sources (39 per cent), with an estimated completeness of 73.0 per cent and contamination rate of 4.7 per cent. Using redshifts and multi-wavelength photometry from GAMA and other public catalogues, we show that H-ATLAS-selected galaxies at $z<0.5$ span a wide range of optical colours, total infrared (IR) luminosities, and IR/UV ratios, with no strong disposition towards mid-IR-classified AGN in comparison with optical selection. The data described herein, together with all maps and catalogues described in the companion paper (Valiante et al. 2016), are available from the H-ATLAS website at www.h-atlas.org.
  • Both theoretical predictions and observations of the very nearby Universe suggest that low-mass galaxies (log$_{10}$[M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$]<9.5) are likely to remain star-forming unless they are affected by their local environment. To test this premise, we compare and contrast the local environment of both passive and star-forming galaxies as a function of stellar mass, using the Galaxy and Mass Assembly survey. We find that passive fractions are higher in both interacting pair and group galaxies than the field at all stellar masses, and that this effect is most apparent in the lowest mass galaxies. We also find that essentially all passive log$_{10}$[M$_{*}$/M$_{\odot}$]<8.5 galaxies are found in pair/group environments, suggesting that local interactions with a more massive neighbour cause them to cease forming new stars. We find that the effects of immediate environment (local galaxy-galaxy interactions) in forming passive systems increases with decreasing stellar mass, and highlight that this is potentially due to increasing interaction timescales giving sufficient time for the galaxy to become passive via starvation. We then present a simplistic model to test this premise, and show that given our speculative assumptions, it is consistent with our observed results.
  • The modification of star formation (SF) in galaxy interactions is a complex process, with SF observed to be both enhanced in major mergers and suppressed in minor pair interactions. Such changes likely to arise on short timescales and be directly related to the galaxy-galaxy interaction time. Here we investigate the link between dynamical phase and direct measures of SF on different timescales for pair galaxies, targeting numerous star-formation rate (SFR) indicators and comparing to pair separation, individual galaxy mass and pair mass ratio. We split our sample into the higher (primary) and lower (secondary) mass galaxies in each pair and find that SF is indeed enhanced in all primary galaxies but suppressed in secondaries of minor mergers. We find that changes in SF of primaries is consistent in both major and minor mergers, suggesting that SF in the more massive galaxy is agnostic to pair mass ratio. We also find that SF is enhanced/suppressed more strongly for short-time duration SFR indicators (e.g. H-alpha), highlighting recent changes to SF in these galaxies, which are likely to be induced by the interaction. We propose a scenario where the lower mass galaxy has its SF suppressed by gas heating or stripping, while the higher mass galaxy has its SF enhanced, potentially by tidal gas turbulence and shocks. This is consistent with the seemingly contradictory observations for both SF suppression and enhancement in close pairs.
  • We discuss the construction of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) 10h region (G10) using publicly available data in the Cosmic Evolution Survey region (COSMOS) in order to extend the GAMA survey to z~1 in a single ~1 deg^2 field. In order to obtain the maximum number of high precision spectroscopic redshifts we re-reduce all archival zCOSMOS-bright data and use the GAMA automatic cross-correlation redshift fitting code autoz. We use all available redshift information (autoz, zCOSMOS-bright 10k, PRIMUS, VVDS, SDSS and photometric redshifts) to calculate robust best-fit redshifts for all galaxies and visually inspect all 1D and 2D spectra to obtain 16,583 robust redshifts in the full COSMOS region. We then define the G10 region to be the central ~1deg^2 of COSMOS, which has relatively high spectroscopic completeness, and encompasses the CHILES VLA region. We define a combined r < 23.0mag & i < 22.0mag G10 sample (selected to have the highest bijective overlap) with which to perform future analysis, containing 9,861 sources with reliable high precision VLT-VIMOS spectra. All tables, spectra and imaging are available at: http://ict.icrar.org/cutout/G10 .
  • We present bivariate luminosity and stellar mass functions of H$\alpha$ star forming galaxies drawn from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. While optically deep spectroscopic observations of GAMA over a wide sky area enable the detection of a large number of $0.001<{SFR}_{H\alpha}$ (M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$)$<100$ galaxies, the requirement for an H$\alpha$ detection in targets selected from an $r$-band magnitude limited survey leads to an incompleteness due to missing optically faint star forming galaxies. Using $z<0.1$ bivariate distributions as a reference we model the higher-$z$ distributions, thereby approximating a correction for the missing optically faint star forming galaxies to the local SFR and stellar mass densities. Furthermore, we obtain the $r$-band LFs and stellar mass functions of H$\alpha$ star forming galaxies from the bivariate LFs. As our sample is selected on the basis of detected H$\alpha$ emission, a direct tracer of on-going star formation, this sample represents a true star forming galaxy sample, and is drawn from both photometrically classified blue and red sub-populations, though mostly from the blue population. On average 20-30% of red galaxies at all stellar masses are star forming, implying that these galaxies may be dusty star forming systems.
  • We use a highly complete subset of the GAMA-II redshift sample to fully describe the stellar mass dependence of close-pairs and mergers between 10^8 Msun and 10^12 Msun. Using the analytic form of this fit we investigate the total stellar mass accreting onto more massive galaxies across all mass ratios. Depending on how conservatively we select our robust merging systems, the fraction of mass merging onto more massive companions is 2.0%-5.6%. Using the GAMA-II data we see no significant evidence for a change in the close-pair fraction between redshift $z = 0.05-0.2$. However, we find a systematically higher fraction of galaxies in similar mass close-pairs compared to published results over a similar redshift baseline. Using a compendium of data and the function $\gamma_M =A(1+z)m$ to predict the major close-pair fraction, we find fitting parameters of $A = 0.021 \pm 0.001$ and $m = 1.53 \pm 0.08$, which represents a higher low-redshift normalisation and shallower power-law slope than recent literature values. We find that the relative importance of in-situ star-formation versus galaxy merging is inversely correlated, with star-formation dominating the addition of stellar material below Mstar and merger accretion events dominating beyond Mstar. We find mergers have a measurable impact on the whole extent of the GSMF, manifest as a deepening of the dip in the GSMF over the next Gyr and an increase in Mstar by as much as 0.01-0.05 dex.
  • The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey has obtained spectra of over 230000 targets using the Anglo-Australian Telescope. To homogenise the redshift measurements and improve the reliability, a fully automatic redshift code was developed (autoz). The measurements were made using a cross-correlation method for both absorption-line and emission-line spectra. Large deviations in the high-pass filtered spectra are partially clipped in order to be robust against uncorrected artefacts and to reduce the weight given to single-line matches. A single figure of merit (FOM) was developed that puts all template matches onto a similar confidence scale. The redshift confidence as a function of the FOM was fitted with a tanh function using a maximum likelihood method applied to repeat observations of targets. The method could be adapted to provide robust automatic redshifts for other large galaxy redshift surveys. For the GAMA survey, there was a substantial improvement in the reliability of assigned redshifts and in the lowering of redshift uncertainties with a median velocity uncertainty of 33 km/s.
  • We present observations of 18 galaxies from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey made with the SPIRAL optical integral field unit (IFU) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The galaxies are selected to have a narrow range in stellar mass (6x10^9Msolar < M* <2x10^10 Msolar) in order to focus on the effects of environment. Local galaxy environments are measured quantitatively using 5th nearest neighbour surface densities. We find that the total star formation rates (SFR) measured from the IFU data are consistent with total SFRs measured from aperture correcting either GAMA or Sloan Digital Sky Survey single-fibre observations. The mean differences are SFR_GAMA/SFR_IFU = 1.26+/-0.23, sigma=0.90 and for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we similarly find SFR_Brinchmann/SFR_IFU = 1.34+/-0.17, sigma=0.67. Examining the relationships with environment, we find off-centre and clumpy Halpha emission is not significantly dependent on environment, being present in 2/7 (29^+20_-11 per cent) galaxies in high-density environments (>0.77 Mpc^-2), and 5/11 (45^+15_-13 per cent) galaxies in low-density environments (<0.77 Mpc^-2). We find a weak but not significant relationship of the total star formation rates of star-forming galaxies with environment. Due to the size of our sample and the scatter observed we do not draw a definitive conclusion about a possible SFR dependence on environment. Examining the spatial distribution of the Halpha emission, we find no evidence for a change in shape or amplitude of the radial profile of star-forming galaxies with environment. If these observations are borne out in larger samples this would infer that any environment-driven star-formation suppression must either act very rapidly (the `infall-and-quench' model) or that galaxies must evolve in a density-dependent manner (an `in-situ evolution' model).
  • We present a combined optical and X-ray analysis of the rich cluster Abell 1882 with the aim of identifying merging substructure and understanding the recent assembly history of this system. Our optical data consist of spectra drawn from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey, which lends itself to this kind of detailed study thanks to its depth and high spectroscopic completeness. We use 283 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members to detect and characterize substructure. We complement the optical data with X-ray data taken with both Chandra and XMM. Our analysis reveals that A1882 harbors two main components, A1882A and A1882B, which have a projected separation of 2Mpc and a line of sight velocity difference of v_{los}=-428km/s. The primary system, A1882A, has velocity dispersion sigma_v=500km/s and Chandra (XMM) temperature kT=3.57keV (3.31keV) while the secondary, A1882B, has sigma_v=457km/s and Chandra (XMM) temperature kT=2.39keV (2.12keV). The optical and X-ray estimates for the masses of the two systems are consistent within the uncertainties and indicate that there is twice as much mass in A1882A (M_{500}=1.5-1.9x10^{14}Msolar) when compared with A1882B (M_{500}=0.8-1.0x10^{14}Msolar). We interpret the A1882A/A1882B system as being observed prior to a core passage. Supporting this interpretation is the large projected separation of A1882A and A1882B and the dearth of evidence for a recent (<2Gyr) major interaction in the X-ray data. Two-body analyses indicate that A1882A and A1882B form a bound system with bound incoming solutions strongly favored. We compute blue fractions of f_b=0.28 and 0.18 for the spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies within r_{500} of the centers of A1882A and A1882B, respectively. These blue fractions do not differ significantly from the blue fraction measured from an ensemble of 20 clusters with similar mass and redshift.
  • Measurements of the low-z Halpha luminosity function have a large dispersion in the local number density of sources, and correspondingly in the SFR density. The possible causes for these discrepancies include limited volume sampling, biases arising from survey sample selection, different methods of correcting for dust obscuration and AGN contamination. The Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) provide deep spectroscopic observations over a wide sky area enabling detection of a large sample of star-forming galaxies spanning 0.001<SFR(Halpha)<100 with which to robustly measure the evolution of the SFR density in the low-z universe. The large number of high SFR galaxies present in our sample allow an improved measurement of the bright end of the luminosity function, indicating that the decrease in number density of sources at bright luminosities is best described by a Saunders functional form rather than the traditional Schechter function. This result is consistent with other published luminosity functions in the FIR and radio. For GAMA and SDSS we find the r-band apparent magnitude limit, combined with the subsequent requirement for Halpha detection leads to an incompleteness due to missing bright Halpha sources with faint r-band magnitudes.
  • In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for fitting galaxy profiles which makes use of the full multi-wavelength data provided by modern large optical-near-infrared imaging surveys. We present a new version of GALAPAGOS, which utilises a recently-developed multi-wavelength version of GALFIT, and enables the automated measurement of wavelength dependent S\'ersic profile parameters for very large samples of galaxies. Our new technique is extensively tested to assess the reliability of both pieces of software, GALFIT and GALAPAGOS on both real ugrizY JHK imaging data from the GAMA survey and simulated data made to the same specifications. We find that fitting galaxy light profiles with multi-wavelength data increases the stability and accuracy of the measured parameters, and hence produces more complete and meaningful multi-wavelength photometry than has been available previously. The improvement is particularly significant for magnitudes in low S/N bands and for structural parameters like half-light radius re and S\'ersic index n for which a prior is used by constraining these parameters to a polynomial as a function of wavelength. This allows the fitting routines to push the magnitude of galaxies for which sensible values can be derived to fainter limits. The technique utilises a smooth transition of galaxy parameters with wavelength, creating more physically meaningful transitions than single-band fitting and allows accurate interpolation between passbands, perfect for derivation of rest-frame values.
  • We have constructed a sample of radio-loud objects with optical spectroscopy from the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) project over the Herschel-ATLAS Phase 1 fields. Classifying the radio sources in terms of their optical spectra, we find that strong-emission-line sources (`high-excitation radio galaxies') have, on average, a factor ~4 higher 250-micron Herschel luminosity than weak-line (`low-excitation') radio galaxies and are also more luminous than magnitude-matched radio-quiet galaxies at the same redshift. Using all five H-ATLAS bands, we show that this difference in luminosity between the emission-line classes arises mostly from a difference in the average dust temperature; strong-emission-line sources tend to have comparable dust masses to, but higher dust temperatures than, radio galaxies with weak emission lines. We interpret this as showing that radio galaxies with strong nuclear emission lines are much more likely to be associated with star formation in their host galaxy, although there is certainly not a one-to-one relationship between star formation and strong-line AGN activity. The strong-line sources are estimated to have star-formation rates at least a factor 3-4 higher than those in the weak-line objects. Our conclusion is consistent with earlier work, generally carried out using much smaller samples, and reinforces the general picture of high-excitation radio galaxies as being located in lower-mass, less evolved host galaxies than their low-excitation counterparts.
  • We have measured the clustering properties of low-redshift (z < 0.3) sub-mm galaxies detected at 250 micron in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase (SDP) field. We selected a sample for which we have high-quality spectroscopic redshifts, obtained from reliably matching the 250-micron sources to a complete (for r < 19.4) sample of galaxies from the GAMA database. Both the angular and spatial clustering strength are measured for all z < 0.3 sources as well as for five redshift slices with thickness delta z=0.05 in the range 0.05 < z < 0.3. Our measured spatial clustering length r_0 is comparable to that of optically-selected, moderately star-forming (blue) galaxies: we find values around 5 Mpc. One of the redshift bins contains an interesting structure, at z = 0.164.
  • We use the GAMA I dataset combined with GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS imaging to construct the low-redshift (z<0.1) galaxy luminosity functions in FUV, NUV, ugriz, and YJHK bands from within a single well constrained volume of 3.4 x 10^5 (Mpc/h)^{3}. The derived luminosity distributions are normalised to the SDSS DR7 main survey to reduce the estimated cosmic variance to the 5 per cent level. The data are used to construct the cosmic spectral energy distribution (CSED) from 0.1 to 2.1 \mum free from any wavelength dependent cosmic variance for both the elliptical and non-elliptical populations. The two populations exhibit dramatically different CSEDs as expected for a predominantly old and young population respectively. Using the Driver et al. (2008) prescription for the azimuthally averaged photon escape fraction, the non-ellipticals are corrected for the impact of dust attenuation and the combined CSED constructed. The final results show that the Universe is currently generating (1.8 +/- 0.3) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} of which (1.2 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is directly released into the inter-galactic medium and (0.6 +/- 0.1) x 10^{35} h W Mpc^{-3} is reprocessed and reradiated by dust in the far-IR. Using the GAMA data and our dust model we predict the mid and far-IR emission which agrees remarkably well with available data. We therefore provide a robust description of the pre- and post dust attenuated energy output of the nearby Universe from 0.1micron to 0.6mm. The largest uncertainty in this measurement lies in the mid and far-IR bands stemming from the dust attenuation correction and its currently poorly constrained dependence on environment, stellar mass, and morphology.
  • We measure the two-point angular correlation function of a sample of 4,289,223 galaxies with r < 19.4 mag from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a function of photometric redshift, absolute magnitude and colour down to M_r - 5log h = -14 mag. Photometric redshifts are estimated from ugriz model magnitudes and two Petrosian radii using the artificial neural network package ANNz, taking advantage of the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic sample as our training set. The photometric redshifts are then used to determine absolute magnitudes and colours. For all our samples, we estimate the underlying redshift and absolute magnitude distributions using Monte-Carlo resampling. These redshift distributions are used in Limber's equation to obtain spatial correlation function parameters from power law fits to the angular correlation function. We confirm an increase in clustering strength for sub-L* red galaxies compared with ~L* red galaxies at small scales in all redshift bins, whereas for the blue population the correlation length is almost independent of luminosity for ~L* galaxies and fainter. A linear relation between relative bias and log luminosity is found to hold down to luminosities L~0.03L*. We find that the redshift dependence of the bias of the L* population can be described by the passive evolution model of Tegmark & Peebles (1998). A visual inspection of a random sample of our r < 19.4 sample of SDSS galaxies reveals that about 10 per cent are spurious, with a higher contamination rate towards very faint absolute magnitudes due to over-deblended nearby galaxies. We correct for this contamination in our clustering analysis.
  • We use the Herschel-ATLAS survey to conduct the first large-scale statistical study of the submm properties of optically selected galaxies. Using ~80,000 r-band selected galaxies from 126 deg^2 of the GAMA survey, we stack into submm imaging at 250, 350 and 500{\mu}m to gain unprecedented statistics on the dust emission from galaxies at z < 0.35. We find that low redshift galaxies account for 5% of the cosmic 250{\mu}m background (4% at 350{\mu}m; 3% at 500{\mu}m), of which approximately 60% comes from 'blue' and 20% from 'red' galaxies (rest-frame g - r). We compare the dust properties of different galaxy populations by dividing the sample into bins of optical luminosity, stellar mass, colour and redshift. In blue galaxies we find that dust temperature and luminosity correlate strongly with stellar mass at a fixed redshift, but red galaxies do not follow these correlations and overall have lower luminosities and temperatures. We make reasonable assumptions to account for the contaminating flux from lensing by red sequence galaxies and conclude that galaxies with different optical colours have fundamentally different dust emission properties. Results indicate that while blue galaxies are more luminous than red galaxies due to higher temperatures, the dust masses of the two samples are relatively similar. Dust mass is shown to correlate with stellar mass, although the dust/stellar mass ratio is much higher for low stellar mass galaxies, consistent with the lowest mass galaxies having the highest specific star formation rates. We stack the 250{\mu}m/NUV luminosity ratio, finding results consistent with greater obscuration of star formation at lower stellar mass and higher redshift. Submm luminosities and dust masses of all galaxies are shown to evolve strongly with redshift, indicating a fall in the amount of obscured star formation in ordinary galaxies over the last four billion years.
  • We determine the low-redshift field galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) using an area of 143 deg^2 from the first three years of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The magnitude limits of this redshift survey are r < 19.4 mag over two thirds and 19.8 mag over one third of the area. The GSMF is determined from a sample of 5210 galaxies using a density-corrected maximum volume method. This efficiently overcomes the issue of fluctuations in the number density versus redshift. With H_0 = 70, the GSMF is well described between 10^8 and 10^11.5 Msun using a double Schechter function with mass^* = 10^10.66 Msun, phi_1^* = 3.96 x 10^-3 Mpc^-3, alpha_1 = -0.35, phi_2^* = 0.79 x 10^-3 Mpc^-3 and alpha_2 = -1.47. This result is more robust to uncertainties in the flow-model corrected redshifts than from the shallower Sloan Digital Sky Survey main sample (r < 17.8 mag). The upturn in the GSMF is also seen directly in the i-band and K-band galaxy luminosity functions. Accurately measuring the GSMF below 10^8 Msun is possible within the GAMA survey volume but as expected requires deeper imaging data to address the contribution from low surface-brightness galaxies.
  • Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) is a project to study galaxy formation and evolution, combining imaging data from ultraviolet to radio with spectroscopic data from the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Using data from phase 1 of GAMA, taken over three observing seasons, and correcting for various minor sources of incompleteness, we calculate galaxy luminosity functions (LFs) and their evolution in the ugriz passbands. At low redshift, z < 0.1, we find that blue galaxies, defined according to a magnitude-dependent but non-evolving colour cut, are reasonably well fit over a range of more than ten magnitudes by simple Schechter functions in all bands. Red galaxies, and the combined blue-plus-red sample, require double power-law Schechter functions to fit a dip in their LF faintward of the characteristic magnitude M* before a steepening faint end. This upturn is at least partly due to dust-reddened disk galaxies. We measure evolution of the galaxy LF over the redshift range 0.002 < z < 0.5 using both a parametric fit and by measuring binned LFs in redshift slices. The characteristic luminosity L* is found to increase with redshift in all bands, with red galaxies showing stronger luminosity evolution than blue galaxies. The comoving number density of blue galaxies increases with redshift, while that of red galaxies decreases, consistent with prevailing movement from blue cloud to red sequence. As well as being more numerous at higher redshift, blue galaxies also dominate the overall luminosity density beyond redshifts z = 0.2. At lower redshifts, the luminosity density is dominated by red galaxies in the riz bands, by blue galaxies in u and g.
  • We present a technique to identify optical counterparts of 250 um-selected sources from the Herschel-ATLAS survey. Of the 6621 250 um > 32 mJy sources in our science demonstration catalogue we find that ~60 percent have counterparts brighter than r=22.4 mag in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Applying a likelihood ratio technique we are able to identify 2423 of the counterparts with a reliability R > 0.8. This is approximately 37 percent of the full 250 micron catalogue. We have estimated photometric redshifts for each of these 2423 reliable counterparts, while 1099 also have spectroscopic redshifts collated from several different sources, including the GAMA survey. We estimate the completeness of identifying counterparts as a function of redshift, and present evidence that 250 um-selected Herschel-ATLAS galaxies have a bimodal redshift distribution. Those with reliable optical identifications have a redshift distribution peaking at z ~ 0.25 +/- 0.05, while sub-mm colours suggest that a significant fraction with no counterpart above the r-band limit have z > 1. We also suggest a method for selecting populations of strongly-lensed high redshift galaxies. Our identifications are matched to UV--NIR photometry from the GAMA survey, and these data are available as part of the Herschel-ATLAS public data release.