• We present spatially, temporally, and spectrally resolved narrow- and broad-band x-ray images of polar-direct-drive (PDD) implosions on OMEGA. These self-emission images were obtained during the deceleration phase and bang time using several multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging instruments fielded along two or three quasi-orthogonal lines-of-sight including equatorial and polar views. The instruments recorded images based on K-shell lines from a titanium tracer located in the shell as well as continuum emission. These observations constitute the first such data obtained for PDD implosions. The image data show features attributed to zero-order hydrodynamics. Equatorial view synthetic images obtained from post-processing a 2D hydrodynamic simulation are consistent with the experimental observation. Polar view images show a pentagonal pattern that correlates with the PDD laser illumination used on OMEGA, thus revealing a 3D aspect of these experiments not previously observed.
  • We present a set of high-resolution 3D MHD simulations of steady light, supersonic jets, exploring the influence of jet Mach number and the ambient medium on jet propagation and energy deposition over long distances. The results are compared to simple self-similar scaling relations for the morphological evolution of jet-driven structures and to previously published 2D simulations. For this study we simulated the propagation of light jets with internal Mach numbers 3 and 12 to lengths exceeding 100 initial jet radii in both uniform and stratified atmospheres. The propagating jets asymptotically deposit approximately half of their energy flux as thermal energy in the ambient atmosphere, almost independent of jet Mach number or the external density gradient. Nearly one-quarter of the jet total energy flux goes directly into dissipative heating of the ICM, supporting arguments for effective feedback from AGNs to cluster media. The remaining energy resides primarily in the jet and cocoon structures. Despite having different shock distributions and magnetic field features, global trends in energy flow are similar among the different models. As expected the jets advance more rapidly through stratified atmospheres than uniform environments. The asymptotic head velocity in King-type atmospheres shows little or no deceleration. This contrasts with jets in uniform media with heads that are slowed as they propagate. This suggests that the energy deposited by jets of a given length and power depends strongly on the structure of the ambient medium. While our low-Mach jets are more easily disrupted, their cocoons obey evolutionary scaling relations similar to the high-Mach jets.
  • We present an extensive synthetic observational analysis of numerically- simulated radio galaxies designed to explore the effectiveness of conventional observational analyses at recovering physical source properties. These are the first numerical simulations with sufficient physical detail to allow such a study. The present paper focuses on extraction of magnetic field properties from nonthermal intensity information. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton intensities provided meaningful information about distributions and strengths of magnetic fields, although considerable care was called for. Correlations between radio and X-ray surface brightness correctly revealed useful dynamical relationships between particles and fields. Magnetic field strength estimates derived from the ratio of X-ray to radio intensity were mostly within about a factor of two of the RMS field strength along a given line of sight. When emissions along a given line of sight were dominated by regions close to the minimum energy/equipartition condition, the field strengths derived from the standard power-law-spectrum minimum energy calculation were also reasonably close to actual field strengths, except when spectral aging was evident. Otherwise, biases in the minimum- energy magnetic field estimation mirrored actual differences from equipartition. The ratio of the inverse-Compton magnetic field to the minimum-energy magnetic field provided a rough measure of the actual total energy in particles and fields in most instances, within an order of magnitude. This may provide a practical limit to the accuracy with which one may be able to establish the internal energy density or pressure of optically thin synchrotron sources.
  • We have developed an economical, effective numerical scheme for cosmic-ray transport suitable for treatment of electrons up to a few hundreds of GeV in multidimensional simulations of radio galaxies. The method follows the electron population in sufficient detail to allow computation of synthetic radio and X-ray observations of the simulated sources, including spectral properties (see the companion paper by Tregillis et al. 1999). The cosmic-ray particle simulations can follow the effects of shock acceleration, second-order Fermi acceleration as well as radiative and adiabatic energy losses. We have applied this scheme to 2-D and 3-D MHD simulations of jet-driven flows and have begun to explore links between dynamics and the properties of high energy electron populations in radio lobes. The key initial discovery is the great importance to the high energy particle population of the very unsteady and inhomogeneous flows, especially near the end of the jet. Because of this, in particular, our simulations show that a large fraction of the particle population flowing from the jet into the cocoon never passes through strong shocks. The shock strengths encountered are not simply predicted by 1-D models, and are quite varied. Consequently, the emergent electron spectra are highly heterogeneous. Rates of synchrotron aging in "hot-spots" seem similarly to be very uneven, enhancing complexity in the spectral properties of electrons as they emerge into the lobes and making more difficult the task of comparing dynamical and radiative ages.
  • We have applied an effective numerical scheme for cosmic-ray transport to 3D MHD simulations of jet flow in radio galaxies (see the companion paper by Jones et al. 1999). The marriage of relativistic particle and 3D magnetic field information allows us to construct a rich set of ``synthetic observations'' of our simulated objects. The information is sufficient to calculate the ``true'' synchrotron emissivity at a given frequency using explicit information about the relativistic electrons. This enables us to produce synchrotron surface-brightness maps, including polarization. Inverse-Compton X-ray surface-brightness maps may also be produced. First results intended to explore the connection between jet dynamics and electron transport in radio lobes are discussed. We infer lobe magnetic field values by comparison of synthetically observed X-ray and synchrotron fluxes, and find these ``inverse-Compton'' fields to be quite consistent with the actual RMS field averaged over the lobe. The simplest minimum energy calculation from the synthetic observations also seems to agree with the actual simulated source properties.