• We present an analysis of all prime HST legacy fields spanning >800 arcmin^2 for the search of z~10 galaxy candidates and the study of their UV luminosity function (LF). In particular, we present new z~10 candidates selected from the full Hubble Frontier Field (HFF) dataset. Despite the addition of these new fields, we find a low abundance of z~10 candidates with only 9 reliable sources identified in all prime HST datasets that include the HUDF09/12, the HUDF/XDF, all the CANDELS fields, and now the HFF survey. Based on this comprehensive search, we find that the UV luminosity function decreases by one order of magnitude from z~8 to z~10 at all luminosities over a four magnitude range. This also implies a decrease of the cosmic star-formation rate density by an order of magnitude within 170 Myr from z~8 to z~10. We show that this accelerated evolution compared to lower redshift can entirely be explained by the fast build-up of the dark matter halo mass function at z>8. Consequently, the predicted UV LFs from several models of galaxy formation are in good agreement with this observed trend, even though the measured UV LF lies at the low end of model predictions. In particular, the number of only 9 observed candidate galaxies is lower, by ~50%, than predicted by galaxy evolution models. The difference is generally still consistent within the Poisson and cosmic variance uncertainties. However, essentially all models predict larger numbers than observed. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope mission, which is poised to find much larger samples of z~10 galaxies as well as their progenitors at less than 400 Myr after the Big Bang.
  • We introduce the ALMA Redshift 4 Survey (AR4S), a systematic ALMA survey of all the known galaxies with stellar mass (M*) larger than 5e10 Msun at 3.5<z<5 in the GOODS--south, UDS and COSMOS CANDELS fields. The sample we have analyzed in this paper is composed of 96 galaxies observed with ALMA at 890um (180um rest-frame) with an on-source integration time of 1.3 min per galaxy. We detected 32% of the sample at more than 3 sigma significance. Using the stacked ALMA and Herschel photometry, we derived an average dust temperature of 40+/-2 K for the whole sample, and extrapolate the Lir and SFR for all our galaxies based on their ALMA flux. We then used a forward modeling approach to estimate their intrinsic sSFR distribution, deconvolved of measurement errors and selection effects: we find a linear relation between SFR and M*, with a median sSFR=2.8+/-0.8 Gyr and a dispersion around that relation of 0.28+/-0.13 dex. This latter value is consistent with that measured at lower redshifts, which is proof that the main sequence of star-forming galaxies was already in place at z=4, at least among massive galaxies. These new constraints on the properties of the main sequence are in good agreement with the latest predictions from numerical simulations, and suggest that the bulk of star formation in galaxies is driven by the same mechanism from z=4 to the present day, that is, over at least 90% of the cosmic history. We also discuss the consequences of our results on the population of early quiescent galaxies. This paper is part of a series that will employ these new ALMA observations to explore the star formation and dust properties of the massive end of the z=4 galaxy population.
  • We present six galaxies at z~2 that show evidence of Lyman continuum (LyC) emission based on the newly acquired UV imaging of the Hubble Deep UV legacy survey (HDUV) conducted with the WFC3/UVIS camera on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). At the redshift of these sources, the HDUV F275W images partially probe the ionizing continuum. By exploiting the HST multi-wavelength data available in the HDUV/GOODS fields, models of the UV spectral energy distributions, and detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the intergalactic medium absorption, we estimate the absolute ionizing photon escape fractions of these galaxies to be very high -- typically >60% (>13% for all sources at 90% likelihood). Our findings are in broad agreement with previous studies that found only a small fraction of galaxies to show high escape fraction. These six galaxies comprise the largest sample yet of LyC leaking candidates at z~2 whose inferred LyC flux has been cleanly observed at HST resolution. While three of our six candidates show evidence of hosting an active galactic nucleus (AGN), two of these are heavily obscured and their LyC emission appears to originate from star-forming regions rather than the central nucleus. This suggests an AGN-aided pathway for LyC escape from these sources. Extensive multi-wavelength data in the GOODS fields, especially the near-IR grism spectra from the 3D-HST survey, enable us to study the candidates in detail and tentatively test some recently proposed indirect methods to probe LyC leakage -- namely, the [OIII]/[OII] line ratio and the H$\beta-$UV slope diagram. High-resolution spectroscopic followup of our candidates will help constrain such indirect methods which are our only hope of studying $f_{esc}$ at z~5-9 in the fast-approaching era of the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • The deep, wide-area (~800-900 arcmin**2) near-infrared/WFC3/IR + Spitzer/IRAC observations over the CANDELS fields have been a remarkable resource for constraining the bright end of high redshift UV luminosity functions (LFs). However, the lack of HST 1.05-micron observations over the CANDELS fields has made it difficult to identify z~9-10 sources robustly, since such data are needed to confirm the presence of an abrupt Lyman break at 1.2 microns. We report here on the successful identification of many such z~9-10 sources from a new HST program (z9-CANDELS) that targets the highest-probability z~9-10 galaxy candidates with observations at 1.05 microns, to search for a robust Lyman-break at 1.2 microns. The potential z~9-10 candidates are preselected from the full HST, Spitzer/IRAC S-CANDELS observations, and the deepest-available ground-based optical+near-infrared observations. We identified 15 credible z~9-10 galaxies over the CANDELS fields. Nine of these galaxies lie at z~9 and 5 are new identifications. Our targeted follow-up strategy has proven to be very efficient in making use of scarce HST time to secure a reliable sample of z~9-10 galaxies. Through extensive simulations, we replicate the selection process for our sample (both the preselection and follow-up) and use it to improve current estimates for the volume density of bright z~9 and z~10 galaxies. The volume densities we find are 5(-2)(+3)x and 8(-3)(+9)x lower, respectively, than found at z~8. When compared with the best-fit evolution (i.e., dlog_{10} rho(UV)/dz=-0.29+/-0.02) in the UV luminosities densities from z~8 to z~4 integrated to 0.3L*(z=3) (-20 mag), these luminosity densities are 2.6(-0.9)(+1.5)x and 2.2(-1.1)(+2.0)x lower, respectively, than the extrapolated trends. Our new results are broadly consistent with the "accelerated evolution" scenario at z>8, as seen in many theoretical models.
  • Galaxies represent one of the preferred candidate sources to drive the reionization of the universe. Even as gains are made in mapping the galaxy UV luminosity density to z>6, significant uncertainties remain regarding the conversion to the implied ionizing emissivity. The relevant unknowns are the Lyman-continuum (LyC) photon production efficiency xi_{ion} and the escape fraction f_{esc}. As we show here, the first of these unknowns is directly measureable in z=4-5 galaxies, based on the impact the Halpha line has on the observed IRAC fluxes. By computing a LyC photon production rate from the implied Halpha luminosities for a broad selection of z=4-5 galaxies and comparing this against the dust-corrected UV-continuum luminosities, we provide the first-ever direct estimates of the LyC photon production efficiency xi_{ion} for the z>~4 galaxy population. We find log_{10} xi_{ion}/[Hz/ergs] to have a mean value of 25.27_{-0.03}^{+0.03} and 25.34_{-0.02}^{+0.02} for sub-L* z=4-5 galaxies adopting Calzetti and SMC dust laws, respectively. Reassuringly, both values are consistent with standardly assumed xi_{ion}'s in reionization models, with a slight preference for higher xi_{ion}'s (by ~0.1 dex) adopting the SMC dust law. A modest ~0.03-dex increase in these estimates would result if the escape fraction for ionizing photons is non-zero and galaxies dominate the ionizing emissivity at z~4.4. High values of xi_{ion} (~25.5-25.8 dex) are derived for the bluest galaxies (beta<-2.3) in our samples, independent of dust law and consistent with results for a z=7.045 galaxy. Such elevated values of xi_{ion} would have important consequences, indicating that f_{esc} cannot be in excess of 13% unless the galaxy UV luminosity function does not extend down to -13 mag or the clumping factor is greater than 3. A low escape fraction would fit well with the low rate of LyC leakage observed at z~3.
  • We identify 4 unusually bright (H < 25.5) galaxies from HST and Spitzer CANDELS data with probable redshifts z ~ 7-9. These identifications include the brightest-known galaxies to date at z > 7.5. As Y-band observations are not available over the full CANDELS program to perform a standard Lyman-break selection of z > 7 galaxies, we employ an alternate strategy using deep Spitzer/IRAC data. We identify z ~ 7.1 - 9.1 galaxies by selecting z >~ 6 galaxies from the HST CANDELS data that show quite red IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] colors, indicating strong [OIII]+Hbeta lines in the 4.5 micron band. This selection strategy was validated using a modest sample for which we have deep Y-band coverage, and subsequently used to select the brightest z > 7 sources. Applying the IRAC criteria to all HST-selected optical-dropout galaxies over the full ~900 arcmin**2 of the CANDELS survey revealed four unusually bright z ~ 7.1, 7.6, 7.9 and 8.6 candidates. The median [3.6]-[4.5] color of our selected z ~ 7.1-9.1 sample is consistent with rest-frame [OIII]+Hbeta EWs of ~1500A, in the [4.5] band. Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy has been independently reported for two of our selected sources, showing Ly-alpha at redshifts of 7.7302+/-0.0006 and 8.683^+0.001_-0.004, respectively. We present similar Keck/MOSFIRE spectroscopy for a third selected galaxy with a probable 4.7sigma Ly-alpha line at z_spec=7.4770+/-0.0008. All three have H-band magnitudes of ~25 mag and are ~0.5 mag more luminous (M(UV) ~ -22.0) than any previously discovered z ~ 8 galaxy, with important implications for the UV LF. Our 3 brightest, highest redshift z > 7 galaxies all lie within the CANDELS EGS field, providing a dramatic illustration of the potential impact of field-to-field variance.
  • We present K-band spectra of rest-frame optical emission lines for 24 star-forming galaxies at z~3.2-3.7 using MOSFIRE on the Keck 1 telescope. Strong rest-frame optical [O III] and Hbeta emission lines were detected in 18 LBGs. The median flux ratio of [O III]5007 to Hbeta is 5.1+/-0.5, a factor of 5-10x higher than in local galaxies with similar stellar masses. The observed Hbeta luminosities are in good agreement with expectations from the estimated star-formation rates, and none of our sources are detected in deep X-ray stacks, ruling out significant contamination by active galactic nuclei. Combining our sample with a variety of LBGs from the literature, including 49 galaxies selected in a very similar manner, we find a high median ratio of [OIII]/Hbeta = 4.8+0.8-1.7. This high ratio seems to be an ubiquitous feature of z~3-4 LBGs, very different from typical local star-forming galaxies at similar stellar masses. The only comparable systems at z~0 are those with similarly high specific star-formation rates, though ~5x lower stellar masses. High specific star-formation rates either result in a much higher ionization parameter or other unusual conditions for the interstellar medium, which result in a much higher [OIII]/Hbeta line ratio. This implies a strong relation between a global property of a galaxy, the specific star-formation rate, and the local conditions of ISM in star-forming regions.
  • The Large Early Galaxy Census (LEGA-C) is a Public Spectroscopic Survey of $\sim3200$ $K$-band selected galaxies at redshifts $z=0.6-1.0$ with stellar masses M_star > 1e10M_sun, conducted with VIMOS on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The survey is embedded in the COSMOS field ($R.A. = 10h00$; $Dec.=+2\deg$). The 20-hour long integrations produce high-$S/N$ continuum spectra that reveal ages, metallicities and velocity dispersions of the stellar populations. LEGA-C's unique combination of sample size and depth will enable us for the first time to map the stellar content at large look-back time, across galaxies of different types and star-formation activity. Observations started in December 2014 and are planned to be completed by mid 2018, with early data releases of the spectra and value-added products. In this paper we present the science case, the observing strategy, an overview of the data reduction process and data products, and a first look at the relationship between galaxy structure and spectral properties, as it existed 7 Gyr ago.
  • We present Hubble WFC3/IR slitless grism spectra of a remarkably bright $z\gtrsim10$ galaxy candidate, GN-z11, identified initially from CANDELS/GOODS-N imaging data. A significant spectroscopic continuum break is detected at $\lambda=1.47\pm0.01~\mu$m. The new grism data, combined with the photometric data, rule out all plausible lower redshift solutions for this source. The only viable solution is that this continuum break is the Ly$\alpha$ break redshifted to ${z_\mathrm{grism}=11.09^{+0.08}_{-0.12}}$, just $\sim$400 Myr after the Big Bang. This observation extends the current spectroscopic frontier by 150 Myr to well before the Planck (instantaneous) cosmic reionization peak at z~8.8, demonstrating that galaxy build-up was well underway early in the reionization epoch at z>10. GN-z11 is remarkably and unexpectedly luminous for a galaxy at such an early time: its UV luminosity is 3x larger than L* measured at z~6-8. The Spitzer IRAC detections up to 4.5 $\mu$m of this galaxy are consistent with a stellar mass of ${\sim10^{9}~M_\odot}$. This spectroscopic redshift measurement suggests that the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to similarly and easily confirm such sources at z>10 and characterize their physical properties through detailed spectroscopy. Furthermore, WFIRST, with its wide-field near-IR imaging, would find large numbers of similar galaxies and contribute greatly to JWST's spectroscopy, if it is launched early enough to overlap with JWST.
  • In order to reproduce the high-mass end of the galaxy mass-distribution, some process must be responsible for the suppression of star-formation in the most massive of galaxies. Commonly Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are invoked to fulfil this role, but the exact means by which they do so is still the topic of much debate, with studies finding evidence for both the suppression and enhancement of star-formation in AGN hosts. Using the ZFOURGE and NMBS galaxy surveys, we investigate the host galaxy properties of a mass-limited (M$_{\odot}$ $\ge$ 10$^{10.5}$ M$_{\odot}$), high-luminosity (L$_{1.4}$ $>$ 10$^{24}$ W Hz$^{-1}$) sample of radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei to a redshift of z = 2.25. In contrast to low redshift studies, which associate radio-AGN activity with quiescent hosts, we find that the majority of z $>$ 1.5 radio-AGN are hosted by star-forming galaxies. Indeed, the stellar populations of radio-AGN are found to evolve with redshift in a manner that is consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy population. Interestingly, we find the radio-AGN fraction is constant across a redshift range of 0.25 $\le$ z $<$ 2.25, perhaps indicating that the radio-AGN duty cycle has little dependence on redshift or galaxy type. We do however see a strong relation between the radio-AGN fraction and stellar mass, with radio-AGN becoming rare below $\sim$ 10$^{10.5}$ M$_{\odot}$ or a halo-mass of 10$^{12}$ M$_{\odot}$. This halo-mass threshold is in good agreement with simulations that initiate radio-AGN feedback at this mass limit. Despite this we find that radio-AGN host star-formation rates are consistent with the non-AGN mass-similar galaxy sample, suggesting that while radio-AGN are in the right place to suppress star-formation in massive galaxies they are not necessarily responsible for doing so.
  • Recent Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) photometric observations have revealed that rest-frame optical emission lines contribute signficantly to the broadband fluxes of high-redshift galaxies. Specifically, in the narrow redshift range z~5.1-5.4 the [3.6]-[4.5] color is expected to be very red, due to contamination of the 4.5-micron band by the dominant Halpha line, while the 3.6-micron filter is free of nebular emission lines. We take advantage of new reductions of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging over the GOODS-North+South fields (Labbe+2015) to obtain a clean measurement of the mean Halpha equivalent width from the [3.6]-[4.5] color in the redshift range z=5.1-5.4. The selected sources either have measured spectroscopic redshifts (13 sources) or lie very confidently in the redshift range z=5.1-5.4 based on the photometric redshift likelihood intervals (11 sources). Our z_{phot}=5.1-5.4 sample and z_{spec}=5.10-5.40 spectroscopic sample have a mean [3.6]-[4.5] color of 0.31+/-0.05 mag and 0.35+/-0.07 mag, implying a rest-frame equivalent width EW(Halpha+[NII]+[SII]) of 665+/-53 Angstroms and 707+/-74 Angstroms, respectively, for sources in these samples. These values are consistent albeit slightly higher than derived by Stark+2013 at z~4, suggesting an evolution to higher values of the Halpha+[NII]+[SII] EW at z>2. Using the 3.6micron band, which is free of emission line contamination, we perform robust SED fitting and find a median specific star formation rate of sSFR = 17_{-5}^{+2} Gyr^{-1}, 7_{-2}^{+1}x higher than at z~2. We find no strong correlation (<2sigma) between the Halpha+[NII]+[SII] EW and the stellar mass of sources. Before the advent of JWST, improvements in these results will come through an expansion of current spectroscopic samples and deeper Spitzer/IRAC measurements.
  • The IRAC ultradeep field (IUDF) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS) programs are two ultradeep imaging surveys at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The primary aim is to directly detect the infrared light of reionization epoch galaxies at z > 7 and to constrain their stellar populations. The observations cover the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), including the two HUDF parallel fields, and the CANDELS/GOODS-South, and are combined with archival data from all previous deep programs into one ultradeep dataset. The resulting imaging reaches unprecedented coverage in IRAC 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m ranging from > 50 hour over 150 arcmin^2, > 100 hour over 60 sq arcmin2, to 200 hour over 5 - 10 arcmin$^2$. This paper presents the survey description, data reduction, and public release of reduced mosaics on the same astrometric system as the CANDELS/GOODS-South WFC3 data. To facilitate prior-based WFC3+IRAC photometry, we introduce a new method to create high signal-to-noise PSFs from the IRAC data and reconstruct the complex spatial variation due to survey geometry. The PSF maps are included in the release, as are registered maps of subsets of the data to enable reliability and variability studies. Simulations show that the noise in the ultradeep IRAC images decreases approximately as the square root of integration time over the range 20 - 200 hours, well below the classical confusion limit, reaching 1{\sigma} point source sensitivities as faint as of 15 nJy (28.5 AB) at 3.6{\mu}m and 18 nJy (28.3 AB) at 4.5{\mu}m. The value of such ultradeep IRAC data is illustrated by direct detections of z = 7 - 8 galaxies as faint as HAB = 28.
  • The Spitzer-Cosmic Assembly Deep Near-Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (S-CANDELS; PI G. Fazio) is a Cycle 8 Exploration Program designed to detect galaxies at very high redshifts (z > 5). To mitigate the effects of cosmic variance and also to take advantage of deep coextensive coverage in multiple bands by the Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury Program CANDELS, S-CANDELS was carried out within five widely separated extragalactic fields: the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey, the Extended Chandra Deep Field South, COSMOS, the HST Deep Field North, and the Extended Groth Strip. S-CANDELS builds upon the existing coverage of these fields from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey (SEDS) by increasing the integration time from 12 hours to a total of 50 hours but within a smaller area, 0.16 square degrees. The additional depth significantly increases the survey completeness at faint magnitudes. This paper describes the S-CANDELS survey design, processing, and publicly-available data products. We present IRAC dual-band 3.6+4.5 micron catalogs reaching to a depth of 26.5 AB mag. Deep IRAC counts for the roughly 135,000 galaxies detected by S-CANDELS are consistent with models based on known galaxy populations. The increase in depth beyond earlier Spitzer/IRAC surveys does not reveal a significant additional contribution from discrete sources to the diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). Thus it remains true that only roughly half of the estimated CIB flux from COBE/DIRBE is resolved.
  • We present a spectroscopic redshift measurement of a very bright Lyman break galaxy at z=7.7302+-0.0006 using Keck/MOSFIRE. The source was pre-selected photometrically in the EGS field as a robust z~8 candidate with H=25.0 mag based on optical non-detections and a very red Spitzer/IRAC [3.6]-[4.5] broad-band color driven by high equivalent width [OIII]+Hbeta line emission. The Lyalpha line is reliably detected at 6.1 sigma and shows an asymmetric profile as expected for a galaxy embedded in a relatively neutral inter-galactic medium near the Planck peak of cosmic reionization. The line has a rest-frame equivalent width of EW0=21+-4 A and is extended with V_FWHM=360+90-70 km/s. The source is perhaps the brightest and most massive z~8 Lyman break galaxy in the full CANDELS and BoRG/HIPPIES surveys, having assembled already 10^(9.9+-0.2) M_sol of stars at only 650 Myr after the Big Bang. The spectroscopic redshift measurement sets a new redshift record for galaxies. This enables reliable constraints on the stellar mass, star-formation rate, formation epoch, as well as combined [OIII]+Hbeta line equivalent widths. The redshift confirms that the IRAC [4.5] photometry is very likely dominated by line emission with EW0(OIII+Hbeta)= 720-150+180 A. This detection thus adds to the evidence that extreme rest-frame optical emission lines are a ubiquitous feature of early galaxies promising very efficient spectroscopic follow-up in the future with infrared spectroscopy using JWST and, later, ELTs.
  • We utilise a two-color Lyman-Break selection criterion to search for z~9-10 galaxies over the first 19 clusters in the CLASH program. A systematic search yields three z~9-10 candidates. While we have already reported the most robust of these candidates, MACS1149-JD, two additional z~9 candidates are also found and have H_{160}-band magnitudes of ~26.2-26.9. A careful assessment of various sources of contamination suggests <~1 contaminants for our z~9-10 selection. To determine the implications of these search results for the LF and SFR density at z~9, we introduce a new differential approach to deriving these quantities in lensing fields. Our procedure is to derive the evolution by comparing the number of z~9-10 galaxy candidates found in CLASH with the number of galaxies in a slightly lower redshift sample (after correcting for the differences in selection volumes), here taken to be z~8. This procedure takes advantage of the fact that the relative volumes available for the z~8 and z~9-10 selections behind lensing clusters are not greatly dependent on the details of the lensing models. We find that the normalization of the UV LF at z~9 is just 0.28_{-0.20}^{+0.39}\times that at z~8, ~1.4_{-0.8}^{+3.0}x lower than extrapolating z~4-8 LF results. While consistent with the evolution in the UV LF seen at z~4-8, these results marginally favor a more rapid evolution at z>8. Compared to similar evolutionary findings from the HUDF, our result is less insensitive to large-scale structure uncertainties, given our many independent sightlines on the high-redshift universe.
  • We measure the UV-continuum slope beta for over 4000 high-redshift galaxies over a wide range of redshifts z~4-8 and luminosities from the HST HUDF/XDF, HUDF09-1, HUDF09-2, ERS, CANDELS-N, and CANDELS-S data sets. Our new beta results reach very faint levels at z~4 (-15.5 mag: 0.006 L*(z=3)), z~5 (-16.5 mag: 0.014L*(z=3)), and z~6 and z~7 (-17 mag: 0.025 L*(z=3)). Inconsistencies between previous studies led us to conduct a comprehensive review of systematic errors and develop a new technique for measuring beta that is robust against biases that arise from the impact of noise. We demonstrate, by object-by-object comparisons, that all previous studies, including our own and those done on the latest HUDF12 dataset, suffer from small systematic errors in beta. We find that after correcting for the systematic errors (typically d(beta) ~0.1-0.2) all beta results at z~7 from different groups are in excellent agreement. The mean beta we measure for faint (-18 mag: 0.1L*(z=3)) z~4, z~5, z~6, and z~7 galaxies is -2.03+/-0.03+/-0.06 (random and systematic errors), -2.14+/-0.06+/-0.06, -2.24+/-0.11+/-0.08, and -2.30+/-0.18+/-0.13, respectively. Our new beta values are redder than we have reported in the past, but bluer than other recent results. Our previously reported trend of bluer beta's at lower luminosities is confirmed, as is the evolution to bluer beta's at high redshifts. beta appears to show only a mild luminosity dependence faintward of M(UV,AB) ~ -19 mag, suggesting that the mean beta asymptotes to ~ -2.2 to -2.4 for faint z>~4 galaxies. At z~7, the observed beta's suggest non-zero, but low dust extinction, and they agree well with values predicted in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.
  • Lyman-Break Galaxy (LBG) samples observed during reionization ($z\gtrsim6$) with Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 are reaching sizes sufficient to characterize their clustering properties. Using a combined catalog from the Hubble eXtreme Deep Field and CANDELS surveys, containing $N=743$ LBG candidates at z>6.5 at a mean redshift of $z=7.2$, we detect a clear clustering signal in the angular correlation function (ACF) at $\sim4\sigma$, corresponding to a real-space correlation length $r_{0}=6.7^{+0.9}_{-1.0}h^{-1}$cMpc. The derived galaxy bias $b=8.6^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$ is that of dark-matter halos of $M=10^{11.1^{+0.2}_{-0.3}}$M$_{\odot}$ at $z=7.2$, and highlights that galaxies below the current detection limit ($M_{AB}\sim-17.7$) are expected in lower-mass halos ($M\sim10^{8}-10^{10.5}$M$_{\odot}$). We compute the ACF of LBGs at $z\sim3.8-z\sim5.9$ in the same surveys. A trend of increasing bias is found from $z=3.8$ ($b\sim3.0$) to $z=7.2$ ($b\sim8.6$), broadly consistent with galaxies at fixed luminosity being hosted in dark-matter halos of similar mass at $4<z<6$, followed by a slight rise in halo masses at $z\sim7$ ($\sim2\sigma$ confidence). Separating the data at the median luminosity of the $z=7.2$ sample ($M_{UV}=-19.4$) shows higher clustering at $z=5.9$ for bright galaxies ($r_{0}=5.5^{+1.4}_{-1.5}h^{-1}$cMpc, $b=6.2^{+1.2}_{-1.5}$) compared to faint galaxies ($r_{0}=1.9^{+1.1}_{-1.0}h^{-1}$cMpc, $b=2.7\pm1.2$) implying a constant mass-to-light ratio $\frac{dlogM}{dlogL}\sim1.2^{+1.8}_{-0.8}$. A similar trend is present in the $z=7.2$ sample with larger uncertainty. Finally, our bias measurements allow us to investigate the fraction of dark-matter halos hosting UV-bright galaxies (the duty-cycle, $\epsilon_{DC}$). At $z=7.2$ values near unity are preferred, which may be explained by the shortened halo assembly time at high-redshift.
  • Spectroscopic + photometric redshifts, stellar mass estimates, and rest-frame colors from the 3D-HST survey are combined with structural parameter measurements from CANDELS imaging to determine the galaxy size-mass distribution over the redshift range 0<z<3. Separating early- and late-type galaxies on the basis of star-formation activity, we confirm that early-type galaxies are on average smaller than late-type galaxies at all redshifts, and find a significantly different rate of average size evolution at fixed galaxy mass, with fast evolution for the early-type population, R_eff ~ (1+z)^-1.48, and moderate evolution for the late-type population, R_eff ~ (1+z)^-0.75. The large sample size and dynamic range in both galaxy mass and redshift, in combination with the high fidelity of our measurements due to the extensive use of spectroscopic data, not only fortify previous results, but also enable us to probe beyond simple average galaxy size measurements. At all redshifts the slope of the size-mass relation is shallow, R_eff ~ M_star^0.22, for late-type galaxies with stellar mass >3x10^9 M_sol, and steep, R_eff M_star^0.75, for early-type galaxies with stellar mass >2x10^10 M_sol. The intrinsic scatter is <~0.2 dex for all galaxy types and redshifts. For late-type galaxies, the logarithmic size distribution is not symmetric, but skewed toward small sizes: at all redshifts and masses a tail of small late-type galaxies exists that overlaps in size with the early-type galaxy population. The number density of massive (~10^11 M_sol), compact (R_eff < 2 kpc) early-type galaxies increases from z=3 to z=1.5-2 and then strongly decreases at later cosmic times.
  • [abridged] We present the discovery of four surprisingly bright (H_160 ~ 26 - 27 mag AB) galaxy candidates at z~9-10 in the complete HST CANDELS WFC3/IR GOODS-N imaging data, doubling the number of z~10 galaxy candidates that are known, just ~500 Myr after the Big Bang. Two similarly bright sources are also detected in a systematic re-analysis of the GOODS-S data set. Three of the four galaxies in GOODS-N are significantly detected at 4.5-6.2sigma in the very deep Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 micron data, as is one of the GOODS-S candidates. Furthermore, the brightest of our candidates (at z=10.2+-0.4) is robustly detected also at 3.6 micron (6.9sigma), revealing a flat UV spectral energy distribution with a slope beta=-2.0+-0.2, consistent with demonstrated trends with luminosity at high redshift. The abundance of such luminous candidates suggests that the luminosity function evolves more significantly in phi_* than in L_* at z>~8 with a higher number density of bright sources than previously expected. Despite the discovery of these luminous candidates, the cosmic star formation rate density for galaxies with SFR >0.7 M_sun/yr shows an order-of-magnitude increase in only 170 Myr from z ~ 10 to z ~ 8, consistent with previous results. Based on the IRAC detections, we derive galaxy stellar masses at z~10, finding that these luminous objects are typically 10^9 M_sun. The cosmic stellar mass density at z~10 is log10 rho_* = 4.7^+0.5_-0.8 M_sun Mpc^-3 for galaxies brighter than M_UV~-18. The remarkable brightness, and hence luminosity, of these z~9-10 candidates highlights the opportunity for deep spectroscopy to determine their redshift and nature, demonstrates the value of additional search fields covering a wider area to understand star-formation in the very early universe, and highlights the opportunities for JWST to map the buildup of galaxies at redshifts much earlier than z~10.
  • Using new ultradeep Spitzer/IRAC photometry from the IRAC Ultradeep Field program (IUDF), we investigate the stellar populations of a sample of 63 Y-dropout galaxy candidates at z~8, only 650Myr after the Big Bang. The sources are selected from HST/ACS+WFC3/IR data over the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), two HUDF parallel fields, and wide area data over the CANDELS/GOODS-South. The new Spitzer/IRAC data increase the coverage at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron to ~120h over the HUDF reaching depths of ~28 (AB,1 sigma). The improved depth and inclusion of brighter candidates result in direct >3 sigma IRAC detections of 20/63 sources, of which 11/63 are detected at > 5 sigma. The average [3.6]-[4.5] colors of IRAC detected galaxies at z~8 are markedly redder than those at z~7, observed only 130Myr later. The simplest explanation is that we witness strong rest-frame optical emission lines (in particular [OIII]4959,5007+Hbeta) moving through the IRAC bandpasses with redshift. Assuming that the average rest-frame spectrum is the same at both z~7 and z~8 we estimate a rest-frame equivalent width of W([OIII]4959,5007+Hbeta) = 670 (+260,-170) Angstrom contributing 0.56 (+0.16,-0.11) mag to the 4.5 micron filter at z~8. The corresponding W(Halpha) = 430 (+160,-110) Angstrom implies an average specific star formation rate of sSFR = 11 (+11,-5) Gyr^-1 and a stellar population age of 100 (+100,-50) Myr. Correcting the spectral energy distribution for the contribution of emission lines lowers the average best-fit stellar masses and mass-to-light ratios by x3, decreasing the integrated stellar mass density to rho*(z=8,MUV<-18)=0.6 (+0.4,-0.3) x 10^6 Msun Mpc^-3.
  • Growing observational evidence now indicates that nebular line emission has a significant impact on the rest-frame optical fluxes of z~5-7 galaxies observed with Spitzer. This line emission makes z~5-7 galaxies appear more massive, with lower specific star formation rates. However, corrections for this line emission have been very difficult to perform reliably due to huge uncertainties on the overall strength of such emission at z>~5.5. Here, we present the most direct observational evidence yet for ubiquitous high-EW [OIII]+Hbeta line emission in Lyman-break galaxies at z~7, while also presenting a strategy for an improved measurement of the sSFR at z~7. We accomplish this through the selection of bright galaxies in the narrow redshift window z~6.6-7.0 where the IRAC 4.5 micron flux provides a clean measurement of the stellar continuum light. Observed 4.5 micron fluxes in this window contrast with the 3.6 micron fluxes which are contaminated by the prominent [OIII]+Hbeta lines. To ensure a high S/N for our IRAC flux measurements, we consider only the brightest (H_{160}<26 mag) magnified galaxies we have identified in CLASH and other programs targeting galaxy clusters. Remarkably, the mean rest-frame optical color for our bright seven-source sample is very blue, [3.6]-[4.5]=-0.9+/-0.3. Such blue colors cannot be explained by the stellar continuum light and require that the rest-frame EW of [OIII]+Hbeta be greater than 637 Angstroms for the average source. The bluest four sources from our seven-source sample require an even more extreme EW of 1582 Angstroms. Our derived lower limit for the mean [OIII]+Hbeta EW could underestimate the true EW by ~2x based on a simple modeling of the redshift distribution of our sources. We can also set a robust lower limit of >~4 Gyr^-1 on the specific star formation rates based on the mean SED for our seven-source sample. (abridged)
  • Star-forming galaxies at redshifts z>6 are likely responsible for the reionization of the universe, and it is important to study the nature of these galaxies. We present three candidates for z~7 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) from a 155 arcmin^2 area in the CANDELS/COSMOS field imaged by the deep FourStar Galaxy Evolution (zFourGE) survey. The FourStar medium-band filters provide the equivalent of R~10 spectroscopy, which cleanly distinguishes between z~7 LBGs and brown dwarf stars. The distinction between stars and galaxies based on an object's angular size can become unreliable even when using HST imaging; there exists at least one very compact z~7 candidate (FWHM~0.5-1 kpc) that is indistinguishable from a point source. The medium-band filters provide narrower redshift distributions compared with broad-band-derived redshifts. The UV luminosity function derived using the three z~7 candidates is consistent with previous studies, suggesting an evolution at the bright end (MUV -21.6 mag) from z~7 to z~5. Fitting the galaxies' spectral energy distributions, we predict Lyman-alpha equivalent widths for the two brightest LBGs, and find that the presence of a Lyman-alpha line affects the medium-band flux thereby changing the constraints on stellar masses and UV spectral slopes. This illustrates the limitations of deriving LBG properties using only broad-band photometry. The derived specific star-formation rates for the bright LBGs are ~13 per Gyr, slightly higher than the lower-luminosity LBGs, implying that the star-formation rate increases with stellar mass for these galaxies.
  • Ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations on the HUDF from the HUDF09 program revealed just one plausible z~10 candidate UDFj-39546284. UDFj-39546284 had all the properties expected of a galaxy at z~10 showing (1) no detection in the deep ACS+WFC3 imaging data blueward of the F160W band, exhibiting (2) a blue spectral slope redward of the break, and showing (3) no prominent detection in deep IRAC observations. The new, similarly deep WFC3/IR HUDF12 F160W observations over the HUDF09/XDF allow us to further assess this candidate. These observations show that this candidate, previously only detected at ~5.9 sigma in a single band, clearly corresponds to a real source. It is detected at ~5.3 sigma in the new H-band data and at ~7.8 sigma in the full 85-orbit H-band stack. Interestingly, the non-detection of the source (<1 sigma) in the new F140W observations suggests a higher redshift. Formally, the best-fit redshift of the source utilizing all the WFC3+ACS (and IRAC+K-band) observations is 11.8+/-0.3. However, we consider the z~12 interpretation somewhat unlikely, since the source would either need to be ~20x more luminous than expected or show very high-EW Ly-alpha emission (which seems improbable given the extensive neutral gas prevalent early in the reionization epoch). Lower-redshift solutions fail if only continuum models are allowed. Plausible lower-redshift solutions require that the H-band flux be dominated by line emission such as Halpha or [OIII] with extreme EWs. The tentative detection of line emission at 1.6 microns in UDFj-39546284 in a companion paper suggests that such emission may have already been found.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of z>8 galaxies based on ultra-deep WFC3/IR data. We constrain the evolution of the UV luminosity function (LF) and luminosity densities from z~11 to z~8 by exploiting all the WFC3/IR data over the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field from the HUDF09 and the new HUDF12 program, in addition to the HUDF09 parallel field data, as well as wider area WFC3/IR imaging over GOODS-South. Galaxies are selected based on the Lyman Break Technique in three samples centered around z~9, z~10 and z~11, with seven z~9 galaxy candidates, and one each at z~10 and z~11. We confirm a new z~10 candidate (with z=9.8+-0.6) that was not convincingly identified in our first z~10 sample. The deeper data over the HUDF confirms all our previous z>~7.5 candidates as genuine high-redshift candidates, and extends our samples to higher redshift and fainter limits (H_160~29.8 mag). We perform one of the first estimates of the z~9 UV LF and improve our previous constraints at z~10. Extrapolating the lower redshift UV LF evolution should have revealed 17 z~9 and 9 z~10 sources, i.e., a factor ~3x and 9x larger than observed. The inferred star-formation rate density (SFRD) in galaxies above 0.7 M_sun/yr decreases by 0.6+-0.2 dex from z~8 to z~9, in good agreement with previous estimates. The low number of sources found at z>8 is consistent with a very rapid build-up of galaxies across z~10 to z~8. From a combination of all current measurements, we find a best estimate of a factor 10x decrease in the SFRD from z~8 to z~10, following (1+z)^(-11.4+-3.1). Our measurements thus confirm our previous finding of an accelerated evolution beyond z~8, and signify a rapid build-up of galaxies with M_UV<-17.7 within only ~200 Myr from z~10 to z~8, in the heart of cosmic reionization.
  • We present first results from a narrowband imaging program for intermediate redshift emission-line galaxies using the newly commissioned FourStar infrared camera at the 6.5m Magellan telescope. To enable prompt identification of H\alpha\ emitters, a pair of custom 1% filters, which sample low-airglow atmospheric windows at 1.19 \mu m and 2.10 \mu m, is used to detect both H\alpha\ and [OII]\lambda 3727 emission from the same redshift volume at z=2.2. Initial observations are taken over a 130 arcmin^2 area in the CANDELS-COSMOS field. The exquisite image quality resulting from the combination of the instrument, telescope, and standard site conditions (~0.55" FWHM) allows the 1.19 \mu m and 2.10 \mu m data to probe 3\sigma\ emission-line depths down to 1.0e-17 erg/s/cm^2 and 1.2e-17 erg/s/cm^2 respectively, in less than 10 hours of integration time in each narrowband. For H\alpha\ at z=0.8 and z=2.2, these fluxes correspond to observed star formation rates of ~0.3 and ~4 Msun/yr respectively. We find 122 sources with a 1.19 \mu m excess, and 136 with a 2.10 \mu m excess, 41 of which show an excess in both bands. The dual narrowband technique, as implemented here, is estimated to identify about >80% of z=2.2 H\alpha\ emitters in the narrowband excess population. With the most secure such sample obtained to-date, we compute constraints on the faint-end slope of the z=2.2 H\alpha\ luminosity function. These "narrow-deep" FourStar observations have been obtained as part of the larger NewH\alpha\ Survey, which will combine the data with "wide-shallow" imaging through a similar narrowband filter pair with NEWFIRM at the KPNO/CTIO 4m telescopes, to enable study of both luminous (but rare) and faint emission-line galaxies in the intermediate redshift universe. [Abridged]