• To reionize the early universe, high-energy photons must escape the galaxies that produce them. It has been suggested that stellar feedback drives galactic outflows out of star-forming regions, creating low density channels through which ionizing photons escape into the inter-galactic medium. We compare the galactic outflow properties of confirmed Lyman continuum (LyC) leaking galaxies to a control sample of nearby star-forming galaxies to explore whether the outflows from leakers are extreme as compared to the control sample. We use data from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope to measure the equivalent widths and velocities of Si II and Si III absorption lines, tracing neutral and ionized galactic outflows. We find that the Si II and Si III equivalent widths of the LyC leakers reside on the low-end of the trend established by the control sample. The leakers' velocities are not statistically different than the control sample, but their absorption line profiles have a different asymmetry: their central velocities are closer to their maximum velocities. The outflow kinematics and equivalent widths are consistent with the scaling relations between outflow properties and host galaxy properties -- most notably metallicity -- defined by the control sample. Additionally, we use the Ly\alpha\ profiles to show that the Si II equivalent width scales with the Ly\alpha\ peak velocity separation. We determine that the low equivalent widths of the leakers are likely driven by low metallicities and low H I column densities, consistent with a density-bounded ionization region, although we cannot rule out significant variations in covering fraction. While we do not find that the LyC leakers have extreme outflow velocities, the low maximum-to-central velocity ratios demonstrate the importance of the acceleration and density profiles for LyC and Ly\alpha\ escape. [abridged]
  • We selected a sample of 76 Lya emitting galaxies from the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey (VUDS) at 2<z<4. We estimated the velocity of the neutral gas flowing out of the interstellar medium as the velocity offset, Deltav, between the systemic redshift (zsys) and the center of low-ionization absorption line systems (LIS). To increase the SN of VUDS spectra, we stacked subsamples. We measured the systemic redshift from the rest-frame UV spectroscopic data using the CIII]1908 nebular emission line, and we considered SiII1526 as the highest signal-to-noise LIS line. We calculated the Lya peak shift with respect to the zsys, the EW(Lya), and the Lya spatial extension, Ext(Lya-C), from the profiles in the 2D stacked spectra. The galaxies that are faint in the rest-frame UV continuum, strong in Lya and CIII], with compact UV morphology, and localized in an underdense environment are characterized by outflow velocities of the order of a few hundreds of km/sec. The subsamples with smaller Deltav are characterized by larger Lya peak shifts, larger Ext(Lya-C), and smaller EW(Lya). In general we find that EW(Lya) anti-correlates with Ext(Lya-C) and Lya peak shift. We interpret these trends using a radiative-transfer shell model. The model predicts that an HI gas with a column density larger than 10^20/cm^2 is able to produce Lya peak shifts larger than >300km/sec. An ISM with this value of NHI would favour a large amount of scattering events, especially when the medium is static, so it can explain large values of Ext(Lya-C) and small EW(Lya). On the contrary, an ISM with a lower NHI, but large velocity outflows would lead to a Lya spatial profile peaked at the galaxy center (i.e. low values of Ext(Lya-C)) and to a large EW(Lya), as we see in our data. Our results and their interpretation via radiative-transfer models tell us that it is possible to use Lya to study the properties of the HI gas.
  • We have recently reported the discovery of five low redshift Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters (LCEs, hereafter) with absolute escape fractions fesc(LyC) ranging from 6 to 13%, higher than previously found, and which more than doubles the number of low redshift LCEs.We use these observations to test theoretical predictions about a link between the characteristics of the Lyman-alpha (Lya) line from galaxies and the escape of ionising photons. We analyse the Lya spectra of eight LCEs of the local Universe observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (our five leakers and three galaxies from the litterature), and compare their strengths and shapes to the theoretical criteria and comparison samples of local galaxies: the Lyman Alpha Reference Survey, Lyman Break Analogs, Green Peas, and the high-redshift strong LyC leaker Ion2. Our LCEs are found to be strong Lya emitters, with high equivalent widths, EW(Lya)> 70 {\AA}, and large Lya escape fractions, fesc(Lya) > 20%. The Lya profiles are all double-peaked with a small peak separation, in agreement with our theoretical expectations. They also have no underlying absorption at the Lya position. All these characteristics are very different from the Lya properties of typical star-forming galaxies of the local Universe. A subset of the comparison samples (2-3 Green Pea galaxies) share these extreme values, indicating that they could also be leaking. We also find a strong correlation between the star formation rate surface density and the escape fraction of ionising photons, indicating that the compactness of star-forming regions plays a role in shaping low column density paths in the interstellar medium of LCEs. The Lya properties of LCEs are peculiar: Lya can be used as a reliable tracer of LyC escape from galaxies, in complement to other indirect diagnostics proposed in the literature.
  • One of the key questions in observational cosmology is the identification of the sources responsible for ionisation of the Universe after the cosmic Dark Ages, when the baryonic matter was neutral. The currently identified distant galaxies are insufficient to fully reionise the Universe by redshift z~6, but low-mass star-forming galaxies are thought to be responsible for the bulk of the ionising radiation. Since direct observations at high redshift are difficult for a variety of reasons, one solution is to identify local proxies of this galaxy population. However, starburst galaxies at low redshifts are generally opaque to their ionising radiation. This radiation with small escape fractions of 1-3% is directly detected only in three low-redshift galaxies. Here we present far-ultraviolet observations of a nearby low-mass star-forming galaxy, J0925+1403, selected for its compactness and high excitation. The galaxy is leaking ionising radiation, with an escape fraction of ~8%. The total number of photons emitted during the starburst phase is sufficient to ionize intergalactic medium material, which is about 40 times more massive than the stellar mass of the galaxy.
  • We propose to infer ionising continuum leaking properties of galaxies by looking at their Lyman-alpha line profiles. We carry out Lyman-alpha radiation transfer calculations in two models of HII regions which are porous to ionising continuum escape: 1) the so-called "density bounded" media, in which massive stars produce enough ionising photons to keep the surrounding interstellar medium transparent to the ionising continuum, i.e almost totally ionised, and 2) "riddled ionisation-bounded" media, surrounded by neutral interstellar medium, but with holes, i.e. with a covering factor lower than unity. The Lyman-alpha spectra emergent from these configurations have distinctive features: 1) a "classical" asymmetric redshifted profile in the first case, but with a small shift of the maximum of the profile compare to the systemic redshift (Vpeak < 150 km/s); 2) a main peak at the systemic redshift in the second case (Vpeak = 0 km/s), with, as a consequence, a non-zero Lyman-alpha flux bluewards the systemic redshift. Assuming that in a galaxy leaking ionising photons, the Lyman-alpha component emerging from the leaking star cluster(s) dominates the total Lyman-alpha spectrum, the Lyman-alpha shape may be used as a pre-selection tool to detect Lyman continuum (LyC) leaking galaxies, in objects with well determined systemic redshift, and high spectral resolution Lyman-alpha spectra (R >= 4000). The examination of a sample of 10 local starbursts with high resolution HST-COS Lyman-alpha spectra and known in the literature as LyC leakers or leaking candidates, corroborates our predictions. Observations of Lyman-alpha profiles at high resolution should show definite signatures revealing the escape of Lyman continuum photons from star-forming galaxies.