• Measurements in the infrared wavelength domain allow us to assess directly the physical state and energy balance of cool matter in space, thus enabling the detailed study of the various processes that govern the formation and early evolution of stars and planetary systems in galaxies over cosmic time. Previous infrared missions, from IRAS to Herschel, have revealed a great deal about the obscured Universe, but sensitivity has been limited because up to now it has not been possible to fly a telescope that is both large and cold. SPICA is a mission concept aimed at taking the next step in mid- and far-infrared observational capability by combining a large and cold telescope with instruments employing state-of-the-art ultra-sensitive detectors. The mission concept foresees a 2.5-meter diameter telescope cooled to below 8 K. With cooling provided by mechanical coolers instead of depending on a limited cryogen supply, the mission lifetime can extend significantly beyond the required three years. SPICA offers instrumentation with spectral resolving powers ranging from R ~50 through 11000 in the 17-230 $\mu$m domain as well as R~28.000 spectroscopy between 12 and 18 $\mu$m. Additionally SPICA will provide efficient 30-37 $\mu$m broad band mapping, and polarimetric imaging in the 100-350 $\mu$m range. SPICA will provide unprecedented spectroscopic sensitivity of ~5 x $10^{-20}$ W/m$^2$ (5$\sigma$/1hr) - at least two orders of magnitude improvement over what has been attained to date. With this exceptional leap in performance, new domains in infrared astronomy will become accessible, allowing us, for example, to unravel definitively galaxy evolution and metal production over cosmic time, to study dust formation and evolution from very early epochs onwards, and to trace the formation history of planetary systems.
  • IR spectroscopy in the range 12-230 micron with the SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) will reveal the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time, bridging the gap between the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and the new generation of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) at shorter wavelengths and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at longer wavelengths. SPICA, with its 2.5-m telescope actively-cooled to below 8K, will obtain the first spectroscopic determination, in the mid-IR rest-frame, of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies, reaching lookback times of 12 Gyr, for large statistically significant samples. Densities, temperatures, radiation fields and gas-phase metallicities will be measured in dust-obscured galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN), sampling a large range in mass and luminosity, from faint local dwarf galaxies to luminous quasars in the distant Universe. AGN and starburst feedback and feeding mechanisms in distant galaxies will be uncovered through detailed measurements of molecular and atomic line profiles. SPICA's large-area deep spectrophotometric surveys will provide mid-IR spectra and continuum fluxes for unbiased samples of tens of thousands of galaxies, out to redshifts of z~6. Furthermore, SPICA spectroscopy will uncover the most luminous galaxies in the first few hundred million years of the Universe, through their characteristic dust and molecular hydrogen features.
  • This paper describes the beginning of the Far-Infrared Surveyor mission study for NASA's Astrophysics Decadal 2020. We describe the scope of the study, and the open process approach of the Science and Technology Definition Team. We are currently developing the science cases and provide some preliminary highlights here. We note key areas for technological innovation and improvements necessary to make a Far-Infrared Surveyor mission a reality.
  • We report the late-time evolution of Type IIb Supernova (SN IIb) 2013df. SN 2013df showed a dramatic change in its spectral features at ~1 year after the explosion. Early on it showed typical characteristics shared by SNe IIb/Ib/Ic dominated by metal emission lines, while later on it was dominated by broad and flat-topped Halpha and He I emissions. The late-time spectra are strikingly similar to SN IIb 1993J, which is the only previous example clearly showing the same transition. This late-time evolution is fully explained by a change in the energy input from the $^{56}$Co decay to the interaction between the SN ejecta and dense circumstellar matter (CSM). The mass loss rate is derived to be ~(5.4 +- 3.2) x 10^{-5} Msun/yr (for the wind velocity of ~20 km/s), similar to SN 1993J but larger than SN IIb 2011dh by an order of magnitude. The striking similarity between SNe 2013df and 1993J in the (candidate) progenitors and the CSM environments, and the contrast in these natures to SN 2011dh, infer that there is a link between the natures of the progenitor and the mass loss: SNe IIb with a more extended progenitor have experienced a much stronger mass loss in the final centuries toward the explosion. It might indicate that SNe IIb from a more extended progenitor are the explosions during a strong binary interaction phase, while those from a less extended progenitor have a delay between the strong binary interaction and the explosion.
  • We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 \mu m using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of equal numbers of objects belonging to the two categories defined by Meeus et al. (2001); 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (at disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is hard to be resolved with 8 meter class telescopes in Q-band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. It indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 \mu m, we suggest that many, not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 \mu m supports that group II disks have continuous at disk geometry. It has been inferred that group I disks may evolve into group II through settling of dust grains to the mid-plane of the proto-planetary disk. However, considering growing evidence for the presence of a hole or gaps in the disk of group I sources, such an evolutionary scenario is unlikely. The difference between groups I and II may reflect different evolutionary pathways of protoplanetary disks.
  • We present near infrared spectroscopic observations of 19 molecular clouds made using the AKARI satellite, and the data reduction pipeline written to analyse those observations. The 2.5 --~5 $\mu$m spectra of 30 objects -- 22 field stars behind quiescent molecular clouds and eight low mass YSOs in cores -- were successfully extracted using the pipeline. Those spectra are further analysed to calculate the column densities of key solid phase molecular species, including H$_2$O, CO$_2$, CO, and OCN$^-$. The profile of the H$_2$O ice band is seen to vary across the objects observed and we suggest that the extended red wing may be an evolutionary indicator of both dust and ice mantle properties. The observation of 22 spectra with fluxes as low as $<$~5 mJy towards background stars, including 15 where the column densities of H$_2$O, CO and CO$_2$ were calculated, provides valuable data that could help to benchmark the initial conditions in star-forming regions prior to the onset of star formation.
  • The disk around the Herbig Ae star HD\,169142 was imaged and resolved at 18.8 and 24.5\,$\mu$m using Subaru/COMICS. We interpret the observations using a 2D radiative transfer model and find evidence for the presence of a large gap. The MIR images trace dust that emits at the onset of the strong rise in the spectral energy distribution (SED) at 20\,$\mu$m, therefore are very sensitive to the location and characteristics of the inner wall of the outer disk and its dust. We determine the location of the wall to be 23$^{+3}_{-5}$\,AU from the star. An extra component of hot dust must exist close to the star. We find that a hydrostatic optically thick inner disk does not produce enough flux in the NIR and an optically thin geometrically thick component is our solution to fit the SED. Considering the recent findings of gaps and holes in a number of Herbig Ae/Be group I disks, we suggest that such disk structures may be common in group I sources. Classification as group I should be considered a support for classification as a transitional disk, though improved imaging surveys are needed to support this speculation.
  • To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass YSOs, we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 $\mu$m to 5 $\mu$m. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS04302), absorption bands of H$_2$O, CO$_2$, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO$_2$ ice and CO ice relative to H$_2$O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN$^-$, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H$_2$O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 $\mu$m is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 $\mu$m provide upper limits to the CH$_3$OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS04302) relative to H$_2$O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN$^-$ could originate in the region close to the protostar, where there are warm temperatures and UV radiation. We detect H$_2$O ice band towards ASR41 and 2MASSJ1628137-243139, which are edge-on class II disks. We also detect H$_2$O ice and CO$_2$ ice towards HV Tau, HK Tau, and UY Aur, and tentatively detect CO gas features towards HK Tau and UY Aur.
  • We present new imaging at 12.81 and 11.7 microns of the central ~40"x30" (~0.7x0.5 kpc) of the starburst galaxy M82. The observations were carried out with the COMICS mid-infrared (mid-IR) imager on the 8.2m Subaru telescope, and are diffraction-limited at an angular resolution of <0".4. The images show extensive diffuse structures, including a 7"-long linear chimney-like feature and another resembling the edges of a ruptured bubble. This is the clearest view to date of the base of the kpc-scale dusty wind known in this galaxy. These structures do not extrapolate to a single central point, implying multiple ejection sites for the dust. In general, the distribution of dust probed in the mid-IR anticorrelates with the locations of massive star clusters that appear in the near-infrared. The 10-21 micron mid-IR emission, spatially-integrated over the field of view, may be represented by hot dust with temperature of ~160 K. Most discrete sources are found to have extended morphologies. Several radio HII regions are identified for the first time in the mid-IR. The only potential radio supernova remnant to have a mid-IR counterpart is a source which has previously also been suggested to be a weak active galactic nucleus. This source has an X-ray counterpart in Chandra data which appears prominently above 3 keV and is best described as a hot (~2.6 keV) absorbed thermal plasma with a 6.7 keV Fe K emission line, in addition to a weaker and cooler thermal component. The mid-IR detection is consistent with the presence of strong [NeII]12.81um line emission. The broad-band source properties are complex, but the X-ray spectra do not support the active galactic nucleus hypothesis. We discuss possible interpretations regarding the nature of this source.
  • The disk around AB Aur was imaged and resolved at 24.6\,$\mu$m using the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope. The gaussian full-width at half-maximum of the source size is estimated to be 90 $\pm$ 6 AU, indicating that the disk extends further out at 24.6\,$\mu$m than at shorter wavelengths. In order to interpret the extended 24.6\,$\mu$m image, we consider a disk with a reduced surface density within a boundary radius $R_c$, which is motivated by radio observations that suggest a reduced inner region within about 100 AU from the star. Introducing the surface density reduction factor $f_c$ for the inner disk, we determine that the best match with the observed radial intensity profile at 24.6\,$\mu$m is achieved with $R_c$=88 AU and $f_c$=0.01. We suggest that the extended emission at 24.6\,$\mu$m is due to the enhanced emission from a wall-like structure at the boundary radius (the inner edge of the outer disk), which is caused by a jump in the surface density at $R_c$. Such reduced inner disk and geometrically thick outer disk structure can also explain the more point-like nature at shorter wavelengths. We also note that this disk geometry is qualitatively similar to a pre-transitional disk, suggesting that the AB Aur disk is in a pre-transitional disk phase.
  • We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) multi-epoch observations of the optical transient in the nearby galaxy NGC300 (NGC300-OT) at 398 and 582 days after the discovery with the Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI. NIR spectra (2--5 um) of NGC300-OT were obtained for the first time. They show no prominent emission nor absorption features, but are dominated by continuum thermal emission from the dust around NGC300-OT. NIR images were taken in the 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 um bands. The spectral energy distributions (SED) of NGC300-OT indicate the dust temperature of 810 (+-14) K at 398 days and 670 (+-12) K at 582 days. We attribute the observed NIR emission to the thermal emission from dust grains formed in the ejecta of NGC300-OT. The multi-epoch observations enable us to estimate the dust optical depth as larger than about 12 at 398 days and larger than about 6 at 582 days at 2.4 um, by assuming an isothermal dust cloud. The observed NIR emission must be optically thick, unless the amount of dust grains increases with time. Little extinction at visible wavelengths reported in earlier observations suggests that the dust cloud around NGC300-OT should be distributed inhomogeneously so as to not screen the radiation from the ejecta gas and the central star. The present results suggest the dust grains are not formed in spherically symmetric geometry, but rather in a torus, a bipolar outflow, or clumpy cloudlets.
  • We made mid-infrared observations of the 10Msun Herbig Be star HD200775 with the Cooled Mid-Infrared Camera and Spectrometer (COMICS) on the 8.2m Subaru Telescope. We discovered diffuse emission of an elliptical shape extended in the north-south direction inabout 1000AU radius around unresolved excess emission. The diffuse emission is perpendicular to the cavity wall formed by the past outflow activity and is parallel to the projected major axis of the central close binary orbit. The centers of the ellipse contours of the diffuse emission are shifted from the stellar position and the amount of the shift increases as the contour brightness level decreases. The diffuse emission is well explained in all of geometry, size, and configuration by an inclined flared disk where only its surface emits the mid-infrared photons. Our results give the first well-resolved infrared disk images around a massive star and strongly support that HD200775 is formed through the disk accretion. The disk survives the main accretion phase and shows a structure similar to that around lower-mass stars with 'disk atmosphere'. At the same time, the disk also shows properties characteristic to massive stars such as photoevaporation traced by the 3.4mm free-free emission and unusual silicate emission with a peak at 9.2micron, which is shorter than that of many astronomical objects. It provides a good place to compare the disk properties between massive and lower-mass stars.
  • We present a theoretical model for Type Ib supernova (SN) 2006jc. We calculate the evolution of the progenitor star, hydrodynamics and nucleosynthesis of the SN explosion, and the SN bolometric light curve (LC). The synthetic bolometric LC is compared with the observed bolometric LC constructed by integrating the UV, optical, near-infrared (NIR), and mid-infrared (MIR) fluxes. The progenitor is assumed to be as massive as $40M_\odot$ on the zero-age main-sequence. The star undergoes extensive mass loss to reduce its mass down to as small as $6.9M_\odot$, thus becoming a WCO Wolf-Rayet star. The WCO star model has a thick carbon-rich layer, in which amorphous carbon grains can be formed. This could explain the NIR brightening and the dust feature seen in the MIR spectrum. We suggest that the progenitor of SN 2006jc is a WCO Wolf-Rayet star having undergone strong mass loss and such massive stars are the important sites of dust formation. We derive the parameters of the explosion model in order to reproduce the bolometric LC of SN 2006jc by the radioactive decays: the ejecta mass $4.9M_\odot$, hypernova-like explosion energy $10^{52}$ ergs, and ejected $^{56}$Ni mass $0.22M_\odot$. We also calculate the circumstellar interaction and find that a CSM with a flat density structure is required to reproduce the X-ray LC of SN 2006jc. This suggests a drastic change of the mass-loss rate and/or the wind velocity that is consistent with the past luminous blue variable (LBV)-like event.
  • We performed mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of 18 local dusty elliptical galaxies by using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board Spitzer. We have significantly detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features from 14 out of the 18 galaxies, and thus found that the presence of PAHs is not rare but rather common in dusty elliptical galaxies. Most of these galaxies show an unusually weak 7.7 um emission feature relative to 11.3 um and 17 um emission features. A large fraction of the galaxies also exhibit H2 rotational line and ionic fine-structure line emissions, which have no significant correlation with the PAH emissions. The PAH features are well correlated with the continuum at 35 um, whereas they are not correlated with the continuum at 6 um. We conclude that the PAH emission of the elliptical galaxies is mostly of interstellar origin rather than of stellar origin, and that the unusual PAH interband strength ratios are likely to be due to a large fraction of neutral to ionized PAHs.
  • SN 2006jc is a peculiar supernova (SN), in which the formation of dust has been confirmed at an early epoch of ~50 days after the explosion. We investigate the possibility of such an earlier formation of dust grains in the expanding ejecta of SN 2006jc, applying the Type Ib SN model that is developed to reproduce the observed light curve. We find that the rapid decrease of the gas temperature in SN 2006jc enables the condensation of C grains in the C-rich layer at 40-60 days after the explosion, which is followed by the condensation of silicate and oxide grains until ~200 days. The average radius of each grain species is confined to be less than 0.01 micron due to the low gas density at the condensation time. The calculated total dust mass reaches ~1.5 Msun, of which C dust shares 0.7 Msun. On the other hand, based on the calculated dust temperature, we show that the dust species and mass evaluated to reproduce the spectral energy distribution observed by AKARI and MAGNUM at day 200 are different from those obtained by the dust formation calculations; the dust species contributing to the observed flux are hot C and FeS grains with masses of $5.6 \times 10^{-4}$ Msun and $2.0 \times 10^{-3}$ Msun, respectively, though we cannot defy the presence of a large amount of cold dust such as silicate and oxide grains up to 0.5 Msun. One of the physical processes responsible for the difference between calculated and evaluated masses of C and FeS grains could be considered to be the destruction of small-sized clusters by energetic photons and electrons prevailing within the ejecta at the earlier epoch.
  • We present our latest results on near- to mid- infrared observation of SN2006jc at 200 days after the discovery using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board $AKARI$. The near-infrared (2--5$\mu$m) spectrum of SN2006jc is obtained for the first time and is found to be well interpreted in terms of the thermal emission from amorphous carbon of 800$\pm 10$K with the mass of $6.9\pm 0.5 \times 10^{-5}M_{\odot}$ that was formed in the supernova ejecta. This dust mass newly formed in the ejecta of SN 2006jc is in a range similar to those obtained for other several dust forming core collapse supernovae based on recent observations (i.e., $10^{-3}$--$10^{-5}$$M_{\odot}$). Mid-infrared photometric data with {\it{AKARI}}/IRC MIR-S/S7, S9W, and S11 bands have shown excess emission over the thermal emission by hot amorphous carbon of 800K. This mid-infrared excess emission is likely to be accounted for by the emission from warm amorphous carbon dust of 320$\pm 10$K with the mass of 2.7$^{+0.7}_{-0.5} \times 10^{-3}M_{\odot}$ rather than by the band emission of astronomical silicate and/or silica grains. This warm amorphous carbon dust is expected to have been formed in the mass loss wind associated with the Wolf-Rayet stellar activity before the SN explosion. Our result suggests that a significant amount of dust is condensed in the mass loss wind prior to the SN explosion. A possible contribution of emission bands by precursory SiO molecules in 7.5--9.5$\mu$m is also suggested.
  • AKARI, the first Japanese satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy, was launched on 2006 February 21, and started observations in May of the same year. AKARI has a 68.5 cm cooled telescope, together with two focal-plane instruments, which survey the sky in six wavelength bands from the mid- to far-infrared. The instruments also have the capability for imaging and spectroscopy in the wavelength range 2 - 180 micron in the pointed observation mode, occasionally inserted into the continuous survey operation. The in-orbit cryogen lifetime is expected to be one and a half years. The All-Sky Survey will cover more than 90 percent of the whole sky with higher spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage than that of the previous IRAS all-sky survey. Point source catalogues of the All-Sky Survey will be released to the astronomical community. The pointed observations will be used for deep surveys of selected sky areas and systematic observations of important astronomical targets. These will become an additional future heritage of this mission.
  • AKARI currently in space carries onboard a cryogenically-cooled lightweight telescope with silicon carbide mirrors. The wavefront error of the AKARI telescope obtained in laboratory measurements at 9 K showed that expected in-orbit imaging performance was diffraction-limited at a wavelength of 6.2 um. The AKARI telescope has a function of focus adjustment by shifting the secondary mirror in parallel to the optical axis. On the 4th day after the jettison of the cryostat aperture lid in the orbit, we observed a star with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI. Since the initial star images observed in the near-infrared (IR) bands were significantly blurred, we twice moved the secondary mirror for the focal adjustment based on the results of model analyses as well as data analyses of the near-IR images. In consequence, we have successfully adjusted the focus of the telescope. The in-orbit imaging performance thus obtained for the AKARI telescope is diffraction-limited at a wavelength of 7.3 um, slightly degraded from that expected from the laboratory measurement.
  • The Infrared Camera (IRC) is one of two focal-plane instruments on the AKARI satellite. It is designed for wide-field deep imaging and low-resolution spectroscopy in the near- to mid-infrared (1.8--26.5um) in the pointed observation mode of AKARI. IRC is also operated in the survey mode to make an all-sky survey at 9 and 18um. It comprises three channels. The NIR channel (1.8--5.5um) employs a 512 x 412 InSb array, whereas both the MIR-S (4.6--13.4um) and MIR-L (12.6--26.5um) channels use 256 x 256 Si:As impurity band conduction arrays. Each of the three channels has a field-of-view of about 10' x 10' and are operated simultaneously. The NIR and MIR-S share the same field-of-view by virtue of a beam splitter. The MIR-L observes the sky about $25' away from the NIR/MIR-S field-of-view. IRC gives us deep insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies, the evolution of planetary disks, the process of star-formation, the properties of interstellar matter under various physical conditions, and the nature and evolution of solar system objects. The in-flight performance of IRC has been confirmed to be in agreement with the pre-flight expectation. This paper summarizes the design and the in-flight operation and imaging performance of IRC.
  • We report on mid- and far-IR Spitzer observations of 7 nearby dusty elliptical galaxies by using the Multiband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) and Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Our sample galaxies are known to contain an excessive amount of interstellar dust against sputtering destruction in hot plasma filling the interstellar space of elliptical galaxies. In order to study the origin and the properties of the excess dust in the hot plasma, we selected galaxies with a wide range of X-ray luminosities but similar optical luminos ities for our Spitzer Guest Observers (GO1) program. The 7 galaxies are detected at the MIPS 24 um, 70 um, and 160 um bands; the far- to mid-IR flux ratios of relatively X-ray-bright elliptical galaxies are lower than those of X-ray-faint galaxies. From the IRS spectra, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features are detected significantly from 5 of the 7 galaxies; t he emission intensities are weaker as the X-ray luminosity of the galaxy is larger. We have found a correlation between the far- to mid-IR flux ratio and the equivalent width of the PAH emission feature. We have obtained apparent spatial correspondence between mid-IR and X-ray distributions in the outer regions for the three X-ray-brightest galaxies in our sample. Possible interpretations for our observational results are discussed.