• S. Abreu, S. V. Akkelin, J. Alam, J. L. Albacete, A. Andronic, D. Antonov, F. Arleo, N. Armesto, I. C. Arsene, G. G. Barnafoldi, J. Barrette, B. Bauchle, F. Becattini, B. Betz, M. Bleicher, M. Bluhm, D. Boer, F. W. Bopp, P. Braun-Munzinger, L. Bravina, W. Busza, M. Cacciari, A. Capella, J. Casalderrey-Solana, R. Chatterjee, L.-W. Chen, J. Cleymans, B. A. Cole, Z. Conesa Del Valle, L. P. Csernai, L. Cunqueiro, A. Dainese, J. Dias de Deus H.-T. Ding, M. Djordjevic, H. Drescher, I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru, A. El, R. Engel, D. d'Enterria, K. J. Eskola, G. Fai, E. G. Ferreiro, R. J. Fries, E. Frodermann, H. Fujii, C. Gale, F. Gelis, V. P. Goncalves, V. Greco, C. Greiner, M. Gyulassy, H. van Hees, U. Heinz, H. Honkanen, W. A. Horowitz, E. Iancu, G. Ingelman, J. Jalilian-Marian, S. Jeon, A. B. Kaidalov, B. Kampfer, Z.-B. Kang, Iu. A. Karpenko, G. Kestin, D. Kharzeev, C. M. Ko, B. Koch, B. Kopeliovich, M. Kozlov, I. Kraus, I. Kuznetsova, S. H. Lee, R. Lednicky, J. Letessier, E. Levin, B.-A. Li, Z.-W. Lin, H. Liu, W. Liu, C. Loizides, I. P. Lokhtin, M. V. T. Machado, L. V. Malinina, A. M. Managadze, M. L. Mangano, M. Mannarelli, C. Manuel, G. Martinez, J. G. Milhano, A. Mocsy, D. Molnar, M. Nardi, J. K. Nayak, H. Niemi, H. Oeschler, J.-Y. Ollitrault, G. Paic, C. Pajares, V. S. Pantuev, G. Papp, D. Peressounko, P. Petreczky, S. V. Petrushanko, F. Piccinini, T. Pierog, H. J. Pirner, S. Porteboeuf, I. Potashnikova, G. Y. Qin, J.-W. Qiu, J. Rafelski, K. Rajagopal, J. Ranft, R. Rapp, S. S. Rasanen, J. Rathsman, P. Rau, K. Redlich, T. Renk, A. H. Rezaeian, D. Rischke, S. Roesler, J. Ruppert, P. V. Ruuskanen, C. A. Salgado, S. Sapeta, I. Sarcevic, S. Sarkar, L. I. Sarycheva, I. Schmidt, A. I. Shoshi, B. Sinha, Yu. M. Sinyukov, A. M. Snigirev, D. K. Srivastava, J. Stachel, A. Stasto, H. Stocker, C. Yu. Teplov, R. L. Thews, G. Torrieri, V. Topor Pop, D. N. Triantafyllopoulos, K. L. Tuchin, S. Turbide, K. Tywoniuk, A. Utermann, R. Venugopalan, I. Vitev, R. Vogt, E. Wang, X. N. Wang, K. Werner, E. Wessels, S. Wheaton, S. Wicks, U. A. Wiedemann, G. Wolschin, B.-W. Xiao, Z. Xu, S. Yasui, E. Zabrodin, K. Zapp, B. Zhang, B.-W. Zhang, H. Zhang, D. Zhou
    Nov. 6, 2007 hep-ph, hep-ex, nucl-ex, nucl-th
    This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.
  • Neutrino telescopes may have the potential to detect the quasi-stable staus predicted by supersymmetric models. Detection depends on stau electromagnetic energy loss and weak interactions. We present results for the weak interaction contribution to the energy loss of high energy staus as they pass through rock. We show that the neutral current weak interaction contribution to the energy loss increases with energy, but it is much smaller than the photonuclear energy loss, however, the charged current contribution may become the dominant process above the energy of $\sim 10^9$ GeV, depending on the parameters of the model. As a consequence, the stau range may be reduced above $\sim 10^9$ GeV as compared to the range neglecting weak interactions. We contrast this with the tau range which is barely changed with the inclusion of charged current interactions.
  • We discuss the interplay between electromagnetic energy loss and weak interactions in the context of quasistable particle particle propagation through materials. As specific examples, we consider staus, where weak interactions may play a role, and taus, where they don't.
  • July 29, 2005 hep-ph
    We study ultrahigh energy astrophysical neutrinos and their interactions within the Standard Model and beyond. We consider propagation of muon neutrinos, tau neutrinos that originate in $\nu_\mu \to \nu_\tau$ oscillations, and tau leptons produced in charged-current neutrino interactions. We show that high energy taus lose their energy through bremsstrahlung, pair production and photonuclear processes until they reach energy of $\sim 10^8$ GeV, bellow which they are more likely to decay. Neutrino interactions at energies above $10^8$GeV could lead to the production of microscopic black holes predicted in theories of extra dimensions, or they can undergo instanton-induced processes. We discuss potential signals for these processes in detectors such as IceCube and ANITA.
  • Astrophysical sources of ultrahigh energy neutrinos yield tau neutrino fluxes due to neutrino oscillations. We study in detail the contribution of tau neutrinos with energies above $10^6$ GeV relative to the contribution of the other flavors. We consider several different initial neutrino fluxes and include tau neutrino regeneration in transit through the Earth and energy loss of charged leptons. We discuss signals of tau neutrinos in detectors such as IceCube, RICE and ANITA.
  • Various pion and photon production mechanisms in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC are discussed. Comparison with RHIC data is done whenever possible. The prospect of using electromagnetic probes to characterize quark-gluon plasma formation is assessed.
  • Astrophysical sources of ultrahigh energy neutrinos yield tau neutrino fluxes due to neutrino oscillations. We study in detail the contribution of tau neutrinos with energies above PeV relative to the contribution of the other flavors. We consider several different initial neutrino fluxes and include tau neutrino regeneration in transit through the Earth and energy loss of charged leptons. We discuss signals of tau neutrinos in detectors such as IceCube, RICE and ANITA.
  • Astrophysical sources of ultrahigh energy neutrinos yield tau neutrino fluxes due to neutrino oscillations. At neutrino energies in the EeV range, radio Cherenkov detection methods show promise for detecting these fluxes. We quantify the tau neutrino contributions to the signal in, for example, a detector like the Radio Ice Cherenkov Experiment (RICE) for a Z-burst flux prediction. Tau neutrino regeneration in transit through the Earth, including energy loss, is evaluated.
  • We present results for the large-$p_T$ inclusive $\pi^0$ production in p-p and A-A collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. We include the full next-to-leading order radiative corrections, $O(\alpha_s^3)$, and nuclear effects such as parton energy loss and nuclear shadowing. We find the next-to-leading order corrections and the parton energy loss effect to be large and $p_T$ dependent, while the nuclear shadowing effects are small ($< 10%$). We calculate the ratio of prompt photons to neutral pions produced in heavy ion collisions and show that at RHIC energies this ratio increases with $p_T$ approaching one at $p_T \sim 8$ GeV, due to the large suppression of $\pi^0$ production. We show that at the LHC, this ratio has a steep $p_T$ dependence and approaches 25% effect at $p_T \sim 40$ GeV. We discuss theoretical uncertainties inherent in our calculation, such as choice of the renormalization, factorization and fragmentation scales and the K-factors which signify the size of higher-order corrections.
  • We present results for inclusive $\pi^0$ production in proton-proton and in Au-Au at RHIC energy $\sqrt s=200$ GeV. We use next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculation and we include nuclear effects such as parton energy loss and nuclear shadowing. We consider the ratio of $\pi^0$ distribution in Au-Au and p-p collisions for $p_T > 3$ GeV for three cases of parton energy loss: 1) constant parton energy loss per parton scattering, $\epsilon^a_n=const$, 2) Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal energy-dependent energy loss, $\epsilon^a_n \sim \sqrt E^a_n$ and 3) Bethe-Heitler energy-dependent energy loss, $\epsilon^a_n \sim E^a_n$. We show that recently observed suppression of $\pi^0$ production in Au-Au collisions at RHIC, which is found to increase with $p_T$ increasing from 3GeV to 8GeV, can be reproduced by $\epsilon^a_n=0.06 E^a_n$. We show that the ratio of prompt photons to neutral pions produced in Au-Au collisions at RHIC has a strong $p_T$ dependence approaching one at $p_T\sim 10$GeV.
  • We present results for prompt photon and inclusive $\pi^0$ production in p-p and A-A collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. We include the full next-to-leading order radiative corrections and nuclear effects, such as nuclear shadowing and parton energy loss. We find the next-to-leading order corrections to be large and $p_T$ dependent. We show how measurements of $\pi^0$ production at RHIC and LHC, at large $p_T$, can provide valuable information about the nature of parton energy loss. We calculate the ratio of prompt photons to neutral pions and show that at RHIC energies this ratio increases with $p_T$ approaching one at $p_T \sim 10$ GeV, due to the large suppression of $\pi^0$ production. We show that at the LHC, this ratio has steep $p_T$ dependence and approaches 10% effect at $p_T \sim 20$ GeV.
  • The energy dependence of "secondary" neutrinos from the process nutau->tau->numubar->mubar for two input tau neutrino fluxes (F^0_nu ~ 1/E_nu and 1/E_nu^2), assumed to have been produced via neutrino oscillations from extragalactic sources, is evaluated to assess the impact of secondary neutrinos on the upward muon rates in a km^3 detector. We show that the secondard fluxes are considerably suppressed for the steeper flux, and even for fluxes ~ 1/E_nu, the secondary flux will be difficult to observe experimentally.
  • The ultrahigh energy cross section for neutrino interactions with nucleons is reviewed, and unitarity constraints are discussed. We argue that existing QCD extrapolations are self-consistent, and do not imply a breakdown of the perturbative expansion in the weak coupling.
  • The photonuclear contribution to charged lepton energy loss has been re-evaluated taking into account HERA results on real and virtual photon interactions with nucleons. With large $Q^2$ processes incorporated, the average muon range in rock for muon energies of $10^9$ GeV is reduced by only 5% as compared with the standard treatment. We have calculated the tau energy loss for energies up to $10^9$ GeV taking into consideration the decay of the tau. A Monte Carlo evaluation of tau survival probability and range show that at energies below $10^7-10^8$ GeV, depending on the material, only tau decays are important. At higher energies the tau energy losses are significant, reducing the survival probability of the tau. We show that the average range for tau is shorter than its decay length and reduce to 17 km in water for an incident tau energy of $10^9$ GeV, as compared with its decay length of 49 km at that energy. In iron, the average tau range is 4.7 km for the same incident energy.
  • We calculate the inclusive cross section for prompt photon production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies ($\sqrt{s}=130$ GeV and $\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV) in the central rapidity region including next-to-leading order, $O(\alpha_{em}\alpha_s^2)$, radiative corrections, initial state nuclear shadowing and parton energy loss effects. We show that there is a significant suppression of the nuclear cross section, up to $\sim 30%$ at $\sqrt{s}=200$ GeV, due to shadowing and medium induced parton energy loss effects. We find that the next-to-leading order contributions are large and have a strong $p_t$ dependence.
  • The recent detection of a gamma-ray flux from the direction of the Galactic center by EGRET on the Compton GRO raises the question of whether this is a point source (possibly coincident with the massive black hole candidate Sgr A*) or a diffuse emitter. Using the latest experimental particle physics data and theoretical models, we examine in detail the gamma-ray spectrum produced by synchrotron, inverse Compton scattering and mesonic decay resulting from the interaction of relativistic protons with hydrogen accreting onto a point-like object. Such a distribution of high-energy baryons may be expected to form within an accretion shock as the inflowing gas becomes supersonic. This scenario is motivated by hydrodynamic studies of Bondi-Hoyle accretion onto Sgr A*, which indicate that many of its radiative characteristics may ultimately be associated with energy liberated as this plasma descends down into the deep potential well. Earlier attempts at analyzing this process concluded that the EGRET data are inconsistent with a massive point-like object. Here, we demonstrate that a more careful treatment of the physics of p-p scattering suggests that a ~10^6 solar mass black hole may be contributing to this high-energy emission.
  • The possible chiral phase transition in high energy heavy-ion collisions may lead to the formation of a disoriented chiral condensate (DCC). However, the existence of many uncorrelated small domains in the rather large interaction volume and the huge combinatorial background make the experimental search for the DCC signal a rather difficult task. We present a novel method for studying the formation of a DCC in high energy heavy-ion collisions utilizing a discrete wavelet transformation. We find the wavelet power spectrum for a DCC to exhibit a strong dependence on the scale while an equilibrium system and the standard dynamical models such as HIJING have a flat spectrum.
  • We present an effective field theory of multiparticle correlations based on analogy with Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity. With the assumption that the field represents particle density fluctuations, and in the case of gaussian-type effective action we find that there are no higer-order correlations, in agreement with the recent observations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We predict that three-dimensional two-particle correlations have Yukawa form. We also present our results for the two-dimensional and one-dimensional two-particle correlations (i.e. cumulants) as projections of our theory to lower dimensions.
  • We present results on rapidity and transverse momentum distributions of inclusive charm quark production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC, including the next-to-leading order, $O(\alpha_s^3)$, radiative corrections and the nuclear shadowing effect. We find the effective, nuclear K-factor to be $K(y)\approx 1.4$ for $\mid y\mid \leq 3$ in the rapidity distribution, while $1\leq K(p_{T}) \leq 3$ for $1GeV\leq p_T \leq 6GeV$ in the $p_T$ distribution. We incorporate multiple parton scatterings in our calculation of the fraction of all central events that contain at least one charm quark pair. We obtain the effective $A$-dependence of the charm cross sections. Finally, we comment on the possibility of detecting the quark-gluon plasma signal as an enhanced charm production in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC.
  • We present an effective field theory of multiparticle correlations based on analogy with Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity. We assume that the field represents particle density fluctuations, and show that in the case of gaussian-type effective action there are no higher-order correlations, in agreement with the recent data. We predict that two-particle correlations have Yukawa form. We also present our results for the two-dimensional and one-dimensional two-particle correlations (i.e. cumulants) as projections of our theory to lower dimensions.
  • We show that photoproduction cross sections recently measured by ZEUS and H-1 at HERA energies$^1$ are in agreement with our earlier prediction based on high-energy hadronic structure of the photon in the QCD minijet-type model$^2$. We present results of an improved calculation of the photoproduction cross section, in which the soft part, motivated by the Regge theory, is taken to be energy-dependent and the semi-hard hadronic part is carefully eikonalized to take into account for the multiple scatterings and to include the appropriate probability that photon would act hadronicaly$^3$. We also show that the extrapolation of our cross section to ultra-high energies, of relevance to the cosmic ray physics, gives significant contribution to the ``conventional'' value, but cannot account for the anomalous muon content observed in the cosmic ray air-showers associated with astrophysical point sources$^4$.
  • We discuss the theory of jet events in high-energy photon-proton interactions using a model which gives a good description of the data available on total inelastic $\gamma p$ cross sections up to $\sqrt{s}$=210 GeV. We show how to calculate the jet cross sections and jet multiplicities and give predictions for these quantities for energies appropriate for experiments at the HERA $ep$ collider and for very high energy cosmic ray observations.
  • We re\,examine the theory of hadronic photon-nucleon interactions at the quark-gluon level. The possibility of multiple parton collisions in a single photon-nucleon collision requires an eikonal treatment of the high-energy scattering process. We give a general formulation of the theory in which the $\gamma p$ cross section is expressed as a sum over properly eikonalized cross sections for the interaction of the virtual hadronic components of the photon with the proton, with each cross section weighted by the probability with which that component appears in the photon, and then develop a detailed model which includes contributions from light vector mesons and from excited virtual states described in a quark-gluon basis. The parton distribution functions which appear can be related approximately to those in the pion, while a weighted sum gives the distribution functions for the photon. We use the model to make improved QCD-based predictions for the total inelastic photon-nucleon and photon-nucleus cross sections at energies relevant for HERA experiments and cosmic ray observations. We emphasize the importance in this procedure of including a soft-scattering background such that the calculated cross sections join smoothly with low-energy data.
  • We review recent experimental results on intermittency and multidimensional particle correlations in high-energy leptonic, hadronic and nuclear collisions. We discuss different theoretical models, including self-similar cascading and QCD parton showers, models with phase transitions and the three-dimensional statistical field theory for multiparticle density fluctuations.
  • A statistical field theory of particle production is presented using a gaussian functional in three dimensions. Identifying the field with the particle density fluctuation results in zero correlations of order three and higher, while the second order correlation function is of a Yukawa form. A detailed scheme for projecting the theoretical three-dimensional correlation onto data of three and fewer dimensions illustrates how theoretical predictions are tested against experimental moments in the different dimensions. An example given in terms of NA35 parameters should be testable against future NA35 data.