• We presented optical and near-infrared multi-band linear polarimetry of the highly reddened Type Ia SN~2014J appeared in M82. SN~2014J exhibits large polarization at shorter wavelengths, e.g., $4.8$\% in $B$ band, and the polarization decreases rapidly at longer wavelengths, with the position angle of the polarization remaining at approximately $40^{\circ}$ over the observed wavelength range. These polarimetric properties suggest that the observed polarization is likely to be caused predominantly by the interstellar dust within M82. Further analysis shows that the polarization peaks at a wavelengths much shorter than those obtained for the Galactic dust. The wavelength dependence of the polarization can be better described by an inverse power law rather than by Serkowski law for Galactic interstellar polarization. These suggests that the nature of the dust in M82 may be different from that in our Galaxy, with polarizing dust grains having a mean radius of $<0.1\ \mu$m.
  • Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the Universe. Our knowledge on their importance to dust production is, however, limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) 2010jl around one and half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ~1,350 - 1,450K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ~(7.5 - 8.5) x 10^{-4} Msun. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate on the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (~0.1 micron, and most likely <~0.01 micron). We attribute the dust grains to have been formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ~10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density is required to be >~3 x 10^{7} cm^{-3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of >~0.02 Msun yr^{-1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ~100 km s^{-1}). This strongly supports a scenario that SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous Blue Variable (LBV)-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.
  • We present a set of photometric and spectroscopic observations of a bright Type Ib supernova SN 2012au from -6d until ~+150d after maximum. The shape of its early R-band light curve is similar to that of an average Type Ib/c supernova. The peak absolute magnitude is M_R=-18.7+-0.2 mag, which suggests that this supernova belongs to a very luminous group among Type Ib supernovae. The line velocity of He I {\lambda}5876 is about 15,000 km/s around maximum, which is much faster than that in a typical Type Ib supernova. From the quasi-bolometric peak luminosity of (6.7+-1.3)x10^(42) erg/s, we estimate the \Ni mass produced during the explosion as ~0.30 Msun. We also give a rough constraint to the ejecta mass 5-7 Msun and the kinetic energy (7-18)x10^(51) erg. We find a weak correlation between the peak absolute magnitude and He I velocity among Type Ib SNe. The similarities to SN 1998bw in the density structure inferred from the light curve model as well as the large peak bolometric luminosity suggest that SN 2012au had properties similar to energetic Type Ic supernovae.