• We use the halo occupation distribution (HOD) framework to characterise the predictions from two independent galaxy formation models for the galactic content of dark matter haloes and its evolution with redshift. Our galaxy samples correspond to a range of fixed number densities defined by stellar mass and span $0 \le z \le 3$. We find remarkable similarities between the model predictions. Differences arise at low galaxy number densities which are sensitive to the treatment of heating of the hot halo by active galactic nuclei. The evolution of the form of the HOD can be described in a relatively simple way, and we model each HOD parameter using its value at $z=0$ and an additional evolutionary parameter. In particular, we find that the ratio between the characteristic halo masses for hosting central and satellite galaxies can serve as a sensitive diagnostic for galaxy evolution models. Our results can be used to test and develop empirical studies of galaxy evolution and can facilitate the construction of mock galaxy catalogues for future surveys.
  • We obtain constraints on cosmological parameters from the spherically averaged redshift-space correlation function of the CMASS Data Release 9 (DR9) sample of the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We combine this information with additional data from recent CMB, SN and BAO measurements. Our results show no significant evidence of deviations from the standard flat-Lambda CDM model, whose basic parameters can be specified by Omega_m = 0.285 +- 0.009, 100 Omega_b = 4.59 +- 0.09, n_s = 0.96 +- 0.009, H_0 = 69.4 +- 0.8 km/s/Mpc and sigma_8 = 0.80 +- 0.02. The CMB+CMASS combination sets tight constraints on the curvature of the Universe, with Omega_k = -0.0043 +- 0.0049, and the tensor-to-scalar amplitude ratio, for which we find r < 0.16 at the 95 per cent confidence level (CL). These data show a clear signature of a deviation from scale-invariance also in the presence of tensor modes, with n_s <1 at the 99.7 per cent CL. We derive constraints on the fraction of massive neutrinos of f_nu < 0.049 (95 per cent CL), implying a limit of sum m_nu < 0.51 eV. We find no signature of a deviation from a cosmological constant from the combination of all datasets, with a constraint of w_DE = -1.033 +- 0.073 when this parameter is assumed time-independent, and no evidence of a departure from this value when it is allowed to evolve as w_DE(a) = w_0 + w_a (1 - a). The achieved accuracy on our cosmological constraints is a clear demonstration of the constraining power of current cosmological observations.
  • We measure the quasar two-point correlation function over the redshift range 2.2<z<2.8 using data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We use a homogeneous subset of the data consisting of 27,129 quasars with spectroscopic redshifts---by far the largest such sample used for clustering measurements at these redshifts to date. The sample covers 3,600 square degrees, corresponding to a comoving volume of 9.7(Gpc/h)^3 assuming a fiducial LambdaCDM cosmology, and it has a median absolute i-band magnitude of -26, k-corrected to z=2. After accounting for redshift errors we find that the redshift space correlation function is fit well by a power-law of slope -2 and amplitude s_0=(9.7\pm 0.5)Mpc/h over the range 3<s<25Mpc/h. The projected correlation function, which integrates out the effects of peculiar velocities and redshift errors, is fit well by a power-law of slope -1 and r_0=(8.4\pm 0.6)Mpc/h over the range 4<R<16Mpc/h. There is no evidence for strong luminosity or redshift dependence to the clustering amplitude, in part because of the limited dynamic range in our sample. Our results are consistent with, but more precise than, previous measurements at similar redshifts. Our measurement of the quasar clustering amplitude implies a bias factor of b~3.5 for our quasar sample. We compare the data to models to constrain the manner in which quasars occupy dark matter halos at z~2.4 and infer that such quasars inhabit halos with a characteristic mass of <M>~10^{12}Msun/h with a duty cycle for the quasar activity of 1 per cent.
  • We calculate the real- and redshift-space clustering of massive galaxies at z~0.5 using the first semester of data by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We study the correlation functions of a sample of 44,000 massive galaxies in the redshift range 0.4<z<0.7. We present a halo-occupation distribution modeling of the clustering results and discuss the implications for the manner in which massive galaxies at z~0.5 occupy dark matter halos. The majority of our galaxies are central galaxies living in halos of mass 10^{13}Msun/h, but 10% are satellites living in halos 10 times more massive. These results are broadly in agreement with earlier investigations of massive galaxies at z~0.5. The inferred large-scale bias (b~2) and relatively high number density (nbar=3e-4 h^3 Mpc^{-3}) imply that BOSS galaxies are excellent tracers of large-scale structure, suggesting BOSS will enable a wide range of investigations on the distance scale, the growth of large-scale structure, massive galaxy evolution and other topics.
  • In this paper we present the first results of a deep spectroscopic survey of faint quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Southern Survey, a deep survey carried out by repeatedly imaging a 270 deg^2 area. Quasar candidates were selected from the deep data with good completeness over 0<z<5, and 2 to 3 magnitudes fainter than the SDSS main survey. Spectroscopic follow-up was carried out on the 6.5m MMT with Hectospec. The preliminary sample of this SDSS faint quasar survey (hereafter SFQS) covers ~ 3.9 deg^2, contains 414 quasars, and reaches g=22.5. The overall selection efficiency is ~ 66% (~ 80% at g<21.5); the efficiency in the most difficult redshift range (2<z<3) is better than 40%. We use the 1/V_{a} method to derive a binned estimate of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) and model the QLF using maximum likelihood analysis. The best model fits confirm previous results showing that the QLF has steep slopes at the bright end and much flatter slopes (-1.25 at z<2.0 and -1.55 at z>2.0) at the faint end, indicating a break in the QLF slope. Using a luminosity-dependent density evolution model, we find that the quasar density at M_{g}<-22.5 peaks at z~2, which is later in cosmic time than the peak of z~2.5 found from surveys of more luminous objects. The SFQS QLF is consistent with the results of the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, the SDSS, and the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey, but probes fainter quasars. We plan to obtain more quasars from future observations and establish a complete faint quasar sample with more than 1000 objects over 10 deg^2.
  • We present measurements of the normalised redshift-space three-point correlation function (Q_z) of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) main galaxy sample. We have applied our "npt" algorithm to both a volume-limited (36738 galaxies) and magnitude-limited sample (134741 galaxies) of SDSS galaxies, and find consistent results between the two samples, thus confirming the weak luminosity dependence of Q_z recently seen by other authors. We compare our results to other Q_z measurements in the literature and find it to be consistent within the full jack-knife error estimates. However, we find these errors are significantly increased by the presence of the ``Sloan Great Wall'' (at z ~ 0.08) within these two SDSS datasets, which changes the 3-point correlation function (3PCF) by 70% on large scales (s>=10h^-1 Mpc). If we exclude this supercluster, our observed Q_z is in better agreement with that obtained from the 2dFGRS by other authors, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of these higher-order correlation functions to large-scale structures in the Universe. This analysis highlights that the SDSS datasets used here are not ``fair samples'' of the Universe for the estimation of higher-order clustering statistics and larger volumes are required. We study the shape-dependence of Q_z(s,q,theta) as one expects this measurement to depend on scale if the large scale structure in the Universe has grown via gravitational instability from Gaussian initial conditions. On small scales (s <= 6h^-1 Mpc), we see some evidence for shape-dependence in Q_z, but at present our measurements are consistent with a constant within the errors (Q_z ~ 0.75 +/- 0.05). On scales >10h^-1 Mpc, we see considerable shape-dependence in Q_z.
  • We study the luminosity and color dependence of the galaxy 2-point correlation function in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, starting from a sample of 200,000 galaxies over 2500 deg^2. We concentrate on the projected correlation function w(r_p), which is directly related to the real space \xi(r). The amplitude of w(r_p) grows continuously with luminosity, rising more steeply above the characteristic luminosity L_*. Redder galaxies exhibit a higher amplitude and steeper correlation function at all luminosities. The correlation amplitude of blue galaxies increases continuously with luminosity, but the luminosity dependence for red galaxies is less regular, with bright red galaxies more strongly clustered at large scales and faint red galaxies more strongly clustered at small scales. We interpret these results using halo occupation distribution (HOD) models assuming concordance cosmological parameters. For most samples, an HOD model with two adjustable parameters fits the w(r_p) data better than a power-law, explaining inflections at r_p ~ 1-3 Mpc/h as the transition between the 1-halo and 2-halo regimes of \xi(r). The implied minimum mass for a halo hosting a central galaxy above a luminosity threshold L grows as M_min ~ L at low luminosities and more steeply above L_*. The mass at which an average halo has one satellite galaxy brighter than L is M_1 ~ 23 M_min(L). These results imply a conditional luminosity function (at fixed halo mass) in which central galaxies lie far above a Schechter function extrapolation of the satellite population. HOD models nicely explain the joint luminosity-color dependence of w(r_p) in terms of the color fractions of central and satellite populations as a function of halo mass. The inferred HOD properties are in good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions.
  • We present the large-scale correlation function measured from a spectroscopic sample of 46,748 luminous red galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The survey region covers 0.72 h^{-3} Gpc^3 over 3816 square degrees and 0.16<z<0.47, making it the best sample yet for the study of large-scale structure. We find a well-detected peak in the correlation function at 100h^{-1} Mpc separation that is an excellent match to the predicted shape and location of the imprint of the recombination-epoch acoustic oscillations on the low-redshift clustering of matter. This detection demonstrates the linear growth of structure by gravitational instability between z=1000 and the present and confirms a firm prediction of the standard cosmological theory. The acoustic peak provides a standard ruler by which we can measure the ratio of the distances to z=0.35 and z=1089 to 4% fractional accuracy and the absolute distance to z=0.35 to 5% accuracy. From the overall shape of the correlation function, we measure the matter density Omega_mh^2 to 8% and find agreement with the value from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Independent of the constraints provided by the CMB acoustic scale, we find Omega_m = 0.273 +- 0.025 + 0.123 (1+w_0) + 0.137 Omega_K. Including the CMB acoustic scale, we find that the spatial curvature is Omega_K=-0.010+-0.009 if the dark energy is a cosmological constant. More generally, our results provide a measurement of cosmological distance, and hence an argument for dark energy, based on a geometric method with the same simple physics as the microwave background anisotropies. The standard cosmological model convincingly passes these new and robust tests of its fundamental properties.
  • We present galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements over scales 0.025 to 10 Mpc/h in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a flux-limited sample of 127,001 lens galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts and mean luminosity <L> = L_* and 9,020,388 source galaxies with photometric redshifts, we invert the lensing signal to obtain the galaxy-mass correlation function xi_{gm}. We find xi_{gm} is consistent with a power-law, xi_{gm} = (r/r_0)^{-gamma}, with best-fit parameters gamma = 1.79 +/- 0.06 and r_0 = (5.4+/-0.7)(0.27/Omega_m)^{1/gamma} Mpc/h. At fixed separation, the ratio xi_{gg}/xi_{gm} = b/r where b is the bias and r is the correlation coefficient. Comparing to the galaxy auto-correlation function for a similarly selected sample of SDSS galaxies, we find that b/r is approximately scale independent over scales 0.2-6.7 Mpc/h, with mean <b/r> = (1.3+/-0.2)(Omega_m/0.27). We also find no scale dependence in b/r for a volume limited sample of luminous galaxies (-23.0 < M_r < -21.5). The mean b/r for this sample is <b/r>_{Vlim} = (2.0+/-0.7)(Omega_m/0.27). We split the lens galaxy sample into subsets based on luminosity, color, spectral type, and velocity dispersion, and see clear trends of the lensing signal with each of these parameters. The amplitude and logarithmic slope of xi_{gm} increases with galaxy luminosity. For high luminosities (L ~5 L_*), xi_{gm} deviates significantly from a power law. These trends with luminosity also appear in the subsample of red galaxies, which are more strongly clustered than blue galaxies.
  • We measure cosmological parameters using the three-dimensional power spectrum P(k) from over 200,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) in combination with WMAP and other data. Our results are consistent with a ``vanilla'' flat adiabatic Lambda-CDM model without tilt (n=1), running tilt, tensor modes or massive neutrinos. Adding SDSS information more than halves the WMAP-only error bars on some parameters, tightening 1 sigma constraints on the Hubble parameter from h~0.74+0.18-0.07 to h~0.70+0.04-0.03, on the matter density from Omega_m~0.25+/-0.10 to Omega_m~0.30+/-0.04 (1 sigma) and on neutrino masses from <11 eV to <0.6 eV (95%). SDSS helps even more when dropping prior assumptions about curvature, neutrinos, tensor modes and the equation of state. Our results are in substantial agreement with the joint analysis of WMAP and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, which is an impressive consistency check with independent redshift survey data and analysis techniques. In this paper, we place particular emphasis on clarifying the physical origin of the constraints, i.e., what we do and do not know when using different data sets and prior assumptions. For instance, dropping the assumption that space is perfectly flat, the WMAP-only constraint on the measured age of the Universe tightens from t0~16.3+2.3-1.8 Gyr to t0~14.1+1.0-0.9 Gyr by adding SDSS and SN Ia data. Including tensors, running tilt, neutrino mass and equation of state in the list of free parameters, many constraints are still quite weak, but future cosmological measurements from SDSS and other sources should allow these to be substantially tightened.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will observe around 10^6 spectra from targets distributed over an area of about 10,000 square degrees, using a multi-object fiber spectrograph which can simultaneously observe 640 objects in a circular field-of-view (referred to as a ``tile'') 1.49 degrees in radius. No two fibers can be placed closer than 55'' during the same observation; multiple targets closer than this distance are said to ``collide.'' We present here a method of allocating fibers to desired targets given a set of tile centers which includes the effects of collisions and which is nearly optimally efficient and uniform. Because of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution (which form the bulk of the SDSS targets), a naive covering the sky with equally-spaced tiles does not yield uniform sampling. Thus, we present a heuristic for perturbing the centers of the tiles from the equally-spaced distribution which provides more uniform completeness. For the SDSS sample, we can attain a sampling rate greater than 92% for all targets, and greater than 99% for the set of targets which do not collide with each other, with an efficiency greater than 90% (defined as the fraction of available fibers assigned to targets).
  • We compare the peculiar velocities derived from the I-band Tully-Fisher (TF) relation for 989 field spiral galaxies in the SFI catalogue with the predicted velocity field derived from the IRAS PSCz galaxy redshift survey. We assume linear gravitational instability theory and apply the maximum likelihood technique, VELMOD, to SFI galaxies within cz<6000 km/s. The resulting calibration of the TF relation is consistent with a previous, independent calibration for a similar sample of spirals residing in clusters. Our analysis provides an accurate estimate of the quantity beta. Using the forward TF relation and smoothing the predicted velocity field with a Gaussian filter of radius 300 km/s, we obtain beta = 0.42 +/- 0.04 (1 sigma uncertainty). This value, as well as other parameters in the fit, are robust to varying the smoothing radius to 500 km/s and splitting the sample into spherical shells in redshift space. The one exception is the small-scale velocity dispersion, sigma_v, which varies from 200 km/s within cz= 4000 km/s 500 km/s at larger distance. For beta = 0.42, the residuals between the TF data and the PSCz gravity field are uncorrelated, indicating that the model provides a good fit to the data. More generally, a chi^2 statistic indicates that the PSCz model velocity field provides an acceptable (3 sigma) fit to the data for 0.3 < beta < 0.5.
  • The density and velocity fields as extracted from the Abell/ACO clusters are compared to the corresponding fields recovered by the POTENT method from the Mark~III peculiar velocities of galaxies. In order to minimize non-linear effects and to deal with ill-sampled regions we smooth both fields using a Gaussian window with radii ranging between $12 - 20\hmpc$. The density and velocity fields within $70\hmpc$ exhibit similarities, qualitatively consistent with gravitational instability theory and a linear biasing relation between clusters and mass. The random and systematic errors are evaluated with the help of mock catalogs. Quantitative comparisons within a volume containing $\sim\!12$ independent samples yield $\betac\equiv\Omega^{0.6}/b_c=0.22\pm0.08$, where $b_c$ is the cluster biasing parameter at $15\hmpc$. If $b_c \sim 4.5$, as indicated by the cluster correlation function, our result is consistent with $\Omega \sim 1$.
  • We compare the predicted Abell/ACO cluster density and velocity fields, using linear theory, with that based on the MarkIII catalog and the POTENT machinery within 7000 km/sec. Both density & velocity fields are in good qualitative agreement indicating that apart from a linear biasing factor the optical Abell/ACO clusters do trace the underlying mass distribution quite well.