• We present results from LOFAR and GMRT observations of the galaxy cluster MACS$\,$J0717.5$+$3745. The cluster is undergoing a violent merger involving at least four sub-clusters, and it is known to host a radio halo. LOFAR observations reveal new sources of radio emission in the Intra-Cluster Medium: (i) a radio bridge that connects the cluster to a head-tail radio galaxy located along a filament of galaxies falling into the main cluster, (ii) a 1.9 Mpc radio arc, that is located North West of the main mass component, (iii) radio emission along the X-ray bar, that traces the gas in the X-rays South West of the cluster centre. We use deep GMRT observations at 608 MHz to constrain the spectral indices of these new radio sources, and of the emission that was already studied in the literature at higher frequency. We find that the spectrum of the radio halo and of the relic at LOFAR frequency follows the same power law as observed at higher frequencies. The radio bridge, the radio arc, and the radio bar all have steep spectra, which can be used to constrain the particle acceleration mechanisms. We argue that the radio bridge could be caused by the re-acceleration of electrons by shock waves that are injected along the filament during the cluster mass assembly. Despite the sensitivity reached by our observations, the emission from the radio halo does not trace the emission of the gas revealed by X-ray observations. We argue that this could be due to the difference in the ratio of kinetic over thermal energy of the intra-cluster gas, suggested by X-ray observations.
  • Hitomi made the first direct measurements of galaxy cluster gas motions in the Perseus cluster, which implied that its core is fairly "quiescent", with velocities less than $\sim$200 km s$^{-1}$, despite the presence of an active galactic nucleus and sloshing cold fronts. Building on previous work, we use synthetic Hitomi/SXS observations of the hot plasma of a simulated cluster with sloshing gas motions and varying viscosity to analyze its velocity structure in a similar fashion. We find that sloshing motions can produce line shifts and widths similar to those measured by Hitomi. We find these measurements are unaffected by the value of the gas viscosity, since its effects are only manifested clearly on angular scales smaller than the SXS $\sim$1' PSF. The PSF biases the line shift of regions near the core as much as $\sim 40-50$ km s$^{-1}$, so it is crucial to model this effect carefully. We also infer that if sloshing motions dominate the observed velocity gradient, Perseus must be observed from a line of sight which is somewhat inclined from the plane of these motions, but one that still allows the spiral pattern to be visible. Finally, we find that assuming isotropy of motions can underestimate the total velocity and kinetic energy of the core in our simulation by as much as $\sim$60%. However, the total kinetic energy in our simulated cluster core is still less than 10% of the thermal energy in the core, in agreement with the Hitomi observations.
  • We present the statistical analysis of X-ray surface brightness and gas density fluctuations in cool cores of ten, nearby and bright galaxy clusters that have deep Chandra observations and show observational indications of radio-mechanical AGN feedback. Within the central parts of cool cores the total variance of fluctuations is dominated by isobaric and/or isothermal fluctuations on spatial scales ~ 10-60 kpc, which are likely associated with slow gas motions and bubbles of relativistic plasma. Adiabatic fluctuations associated with weak shocks constitute less than 10 per cent of the total variance in all clusters. The typical amplitude of density fluctuations is small, ~ 10 per cent or less on scales of ~ 10-15 kpc. Subdominant contribution of adiabatic fluctuations and small amplitude of density fluctuations support a model of gentle AGN feedback as opposed to periodically explosive scenarios which are implemented in some numerical simulations. Measured one-component velocities of gas motions are typically below 100-150 km/s on scales < 50 kpc, and can be up to ~ 300 km/s on ~ 100 kpc scales. The non-thermal energy is < 12 per cent of the thermal energy. Regardless of the source that drives these motions the dissipation of the energy in such motions provides heat that is sufficient to balance radiative cooling on average, albeit the uncertainties are large. Presented results here support previous conclusions based on the analysis of the Virgo and Perseus Clusters, and agree with the Hitomi measurements. With next generation observatories like Athena and Lynx, these techniques will be yet more powerful.
  • X-ray spectra from cores of galaxy clusters can be strongly distorted by resonant scattering of line photons, affecting metal abundance and gas velocity measurements. We introduce simulated spectral models that take into account the resonant scattering effect, radial variations of thermodynamic properties of the hot gas, projection effects and small-scale isotropic gas motions. The key feature of the models is that all these effects are treated self-consistently for the whole spectrum, rather than for individual lines. The model spectra are publicly available and can be used for direct comparison with observed projected spectra. Comparison with the existing XMM-Newton and Chandra data of the Perseus Cluster shows that even though there is no strong evidence for the resonant scattering in Perseus, the low energy resolution of the X-ray CCDs is not sufficient to robustly distinguish spectral distortions due to the resonant scattering, different metal abundance profiles and different levels of gas turbulence. Future Astro-H data will resolve most of the problems we are facing with CCDs. With the help of our models, the resonant scattering analysis can be done self-consistently using the whole spectral information, constraining the level of gas turbulence already with a 100 ks observation with Astro-H.
  • We present the results of a deep (280 ks) Chandra observation of the Ophiuchus cluster, the second-brightest galaxy cluster in the X-ray sky. The cluster hosts a truncated cool core, with a temperature increasing from kT~1 keV in the core to kT~9 keV at r~30 kpc. Beyond r~30 kpc the intra-cluster medium (ICM) appears remarkably isothermal. The core is dynamically disturbed with multiple sloshing induced cold fronts, with indications for both Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The sloshing is the result of the strongly perturbed gravitational potential in the cluster core, with the central brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) being displaced southward from the global center of mass. The residual image reveals a likely subcluster south of the core at the projected distance of r~280 kpc. The cluster also harbors a likely radio phoenix, a source revived by adiabatic compression by gas motions in the ICM. Even though the Ophiuchus cluster is strongly dynamically active, the amplitude of density fluctuations outside of the cooling core is low, indicating velocities smaller than ~100 km/s. The density fluctuations might be damped by thermal conduction in the hot and remarkably isothermal ICM, resulting in our underestimate of gas velocities. We find a surprising, sharp surface brightness discontinuity, that is curved away from the core, at r~120 kpc to the southeast of the cluster center. We conclude that this feature is most likely due to gas dynamics associated with a merger and not a result of an extraordinary active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst. The cooling core lacks any observable X-ray cavities and the AGN only displays weak, point-like radio emission, lacking lobes or jets, indicating that currently it may be largely dormant. The lack of strong AGN activity may be due to the bulk of the cooling taking place offset from the central supermassive black hole.
  • Astro-H will be able for the first time to map gas velocities and detect turbulence in galaxy clusters. One of the best targets for turbulence studies is the Coma cluster, due to its proximity, absence of a cool core, and lack of a central active galactic nucleus. To determine what constraints Astro-H will be able to place on the Coma velocity field, we construct simulated maps of the projected gas velocity and compute the second-order structure function, an analog of the velocity power spectrum. We vary the injection scale, dissipation scale, slope, and normalization of the turbulent power spectrum, and apply measurement errors and finite sampling to the velocity field. We find that even with sparse coverage of the cluster, Astro-H will be able to measure the Mach number and the injection scale of the turbulent power spectrum--the quantities determining the energy flux down the turbulent cascade and the diffusion rate for everything that is advected by the gas (metals, cosmic rays, etc.). Astro-H will not be sensitive to the dissipation scale or the slope of the power spectrum in its inertial range, unless they are outside physically motivated intervals. We give the expected confidence intervals for the injection scale and the normalization of the power spectrum for a number of possible pointing configurations, combining the structure function and velocity dispersion data. Importantly, we also determine that measurement errors on the line shift will bias the velocity structure function upward, and show how to correct this bias.
  • Cores of relaxed galaxy clusters are often disturbed by AGN. Their Chandra observations revealed a wealth of structures induced by shocks, subsonic gas motions, bubbles of relativistic plasma, etc. In this paper, we determine the nature and energy content of gas fluctuations in the Perseus core by probing statistical properties of emissivity fluctuations imprinted in the soft- and hard-band X-ray images. About 80 per cent of the total variance of perturbations on ~ 8-70 kpc scales in the inner region have an isobaric nature, i.e., are consistent with slow displacements of the gas in pressure equilibrium with ambient medium. Observed variance translates to the ratio of non-thermal to thermal energy of ~13 per cent. In the region dominated by weak "ripples", about half of the total variance is also associated with isobaric perturbations on scales ~ a few tens of kpc. If these isobaric perturbations are induced by buoyantly rising bubbles, then these results suggest that most of the AGN-injected energy should first go into bubbles rather than into shocks. Using simulations of a shock propagating through the Perseus atmosphere, we found that models reproducing the observed features of a central shock have more than 50 per cent of the AGN-injected energy associated with the bubble enthalpy and only about 20 per cent is carried away with the shock. Such energy partition is consistent with the AGN-feedback model, mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma, and supports the importance of turbulence in the balance between gas heating and radiative cooling.
  • We present the results of a very deep (500 ks) Chandra observation, along with tailored numerical simulations, of the nearest, best resolved cluster cold front in the sky, which lies 90 kpc (19 arcmin) to the north-west of M 87. The northern part of the front appears the sharpest, with a width smaller than 2.5 kpc (1.5 Coulomb mean free paths; at 99 per cent confidence). Everywhere along the front, the temperature discontinuity is narrower than 4-8 kpc and the metallicity gradient is narrower than 6 kpc, indicating that diffusion, conduction and mixing are suppressed across the interface. Such transport processes can be naturally suppressed by magnetic fields aligned with the cold front. Interestingly, comparison to magnetohydrodynamic simulations indicates that in order to maintain the observed sharp density and temperature discontinuities, conduction must also be suppressed along the magnetic field lines. However, the northwestern part of the cold front is observed to have a non-zero width. While other explanations are possible, the broadening is consistent with the presence of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities (KHI) on length-scales of a few kpc. Based on comparison with simulations, the presence of KHI would imply that the effective viscosity of the intracluster medium is suppressed by more than an order of magnitude with respect to the isotropic Spitzer-like temperature dependent viscosity. Underneath the cold front, we observe quasi-linear features that are ~10 per cent brighter than the surrounding gas and are separated by ~15 kpc from each other in projection. Comparison to tailored numerical simulations suggests that the observed phenomena may be due to the amplification of magnetic fields by gas sloshing in wide layers below the cold front, where the magnetic pressure reaches ~5-10 per cent of the thermal pressure, reducing the gas density between the bright features.
  • We present the first measurements of the abundances of $\alpha$-elements (Mg, Si, and S) extending out to beyond the virial radius of a cluster of galaxies. Our results, based on Suzaku Key Project observations of the Virgo Cluster, show that the chemical composition of the intra-cluster medium is consistent with being constant on large scales, with a flat distribution of the Si/Fe, S/Fe, and Mg/Fe ratios as a function of radius and azimuth out to 1.4 Mpc (1.3 $r_{200}$). Chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium due solely to core collapse supernovae (SNcc) is excluded with very high significance; instead, the measured metal abundance ratios are generally consistent with the Solar value. The uniform metal abundance ratios observed today are likely the result of an early phase of enrichment and mixing, with both SNcc and type Ia supernovae (SNIa) contributing to the metal budget during the period of peak star formation activity at redshifts of 2-3. We estimate the ratio between the number of SNIa and the total number of supernovae enriching the intergalactic medium to be between 12-37%, broadly consistent with the metal abundance patterns in our own Galaxy or with the SNIa contribution estimated for the cluster cores.
  • X-ray images of galaxy clusters and gas-rich elliptical galaxies show a wealth of small-scale features which reflect fluctuations in density and/or temperature of the intra-cluster medium. In this paper we study these fluctuations in M87/Virgo, to establish whether sound waves/shocks, bubbles or uplifted cold gas dominate the structure. We exploit the strong dependence of the emissivity on density and temperature in different energy bands to distinguish between these processes. Using simulations we demonstrate that our analysis recovers the leading type of fluctuation even in the presence of projection effects and temperature gradients. We confirm the isobaric nature of cool filaments of gas entrained by buoyantly rising bubbles, extending to 7' to the east and south-west, and the adiabatic nature of the weak shocks at 40" and 3' from the center. For features of 5--10 kpc, we show that the central 4'x 4' region is dominated by cool structures in pressure equilibrium with the ambient hotter gas while up to 30 percent of the variance in this region can be ascribed to adiabatic fluctuations. The remaining part of the central 14'x14' region, excluding the arms and shocks described above, is dominated by apparently isothermal fluctuations (bubbles) with a possible admixture (at the level of about 30 percent) of adiabatic (sound waves) and by isobaric structures. Larger features, of about 30 kpc, show a stronger contribution from isobaric fluctuations. The results broadly agree with an AGN feedback model mediated by bubbles of relativistic plasma.
  • X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analyzed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 8 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10-30 kpc within radii of 30-160 kpc from the cluster center and from 9 to 7 per cent on scales of ~20-30 kpc in an outer, 60-220 kpc annulus. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km/s on ~20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km/s on smaller scales ~7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the power spectrum of the density fluctuations is lower than 7-8 per cent for radii ~30-220 kpc from the center, leading to a density bias of less than 3-4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density-velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in these quantities.
  • The hot, X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales significantly shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM has remained open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep Chandra X-ray observatory data and a new data-analysis method that enables us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate due to the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius - it might therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in atmospheres of X-ray gas-rich systems.
  • Exploring the ICM power spectrum can help us to probe the physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its relation with the thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (density, entropy, or pressure) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For low 3D Mach number M~0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M>0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute, passing the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, associated with isotropic (or slightly radial) turbulence. Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting towards isotropic velocities. Remarkably, regardless of the regime, the variance of density perturbations is comparable to the 1D Mach number. This linear relation allows to easily convert between gas motions and ICM perturbations, which can be exploited by Chandra, XMM data and by the forthcoming Astro-H. At intermediate and small scales (10-100 kpc), the turbulent velocities develop a Kolmogorov cascade. The thermodynamic perturbations act as effective tracers of the velocity field, broadly consistent with the Kolmogorov-Obukhov-Corrsin advection theory. Thermal conduction acts to damp the gas fluctuations, washing out the filamentary structures and steepening the spectrum, while leaving unaltered the velocity cascade. The ratio of the velocity and density spectrum thus inverts the downtrend shown by the non-diffusive models, allowing to probe the presence of significant conductivity in the ICM.
  • We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the ICM using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: $(\delta\rho_k/\rho)^2 = \eta_1^2 (V_{1,k}/c_s)^2$, where $\delta\rho_k/\rho$ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wave number $k$, $V_{1,k}^2=V_k^2/3$ is the mean square component of the velocity field, $c_s$ is the sound speed, and $\eta_1$ is a dimensionless constant of order unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find $\eta_1\approx 1 \pm 0.3$. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proportional because the former are a passive scalar advected by the latter. This opens an interesting possibility to use gas density power spectra as a proxy for the velocity power spectra in relaxed clusters, across a wide range of scales.
  • We present the results from extensive, new observations of the Perseus Cluster of galaxies, obtained as a Suzaku Key Project. The 85 pointings analyzed span eight azimuthal directions out to 2 degrees = 2.6 Mpc, to and beyond the virial radius r_200 ~ 1.8 Mpc, offering the most detailed X-ray observation of the intracluster medium (ICM) at large radii in any cluster to date. The azimuthally averaged density profile for r>0.4r_200 is relatively flat, with a best-fit power-law index of 1.69+/-0.13 significantly smaller than expected from numerical simulations. The entropy profile in the outskirts lies systematically below the power-law behavior expected from large-scale structure formation models which include only the heating associated with gravitational collapse. The pressure profile beyond ~0.6r_200 shows an excess with respect to the best-fit model describing the SZ measurements for a sample of clusters observed with Planck. The inconsistency between the expected and measured density, entropy, and pressure profiles can be explained primarily by an overestimation of the density due to inhomogeneous gas distribution in the outskirts; there is no evidence for a bias in the temperature measurements within the virial radius. We find significant differences in thermodynamic properties of the ICM at large radii along the different arms. Along the cluster minor axis, we find a flattening of the entropy profiles outside ~0.6r_200, while along the major axis, the entropy rises all the way to the outskirts. Correspondingly, the inferred gas clumping factor is typically larger along the minor than along the major axis.
  • Mechanical feedback via Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) jets in the centres of galaxy groups and clusters is a crucial ingredient in current models of galaxy formation and cluster evolution. Jet feedback is believed to regulate gas cooling and thus star formation in the most massive galaxies, but a robust physical understanding of this feedback mode is currently lacking. The large collecting area, excellent spectral resolution and high spatial resolution of Athena+ will provide the breakthrough diagnostic ability necessary to develop this understanding, via: (1) the first kinematic measurements on relevant spatial scales of the hot gas in galaxy, group and cluster haloes as it absorbs the impact of AGN jets, and (2) vastly improved ability to map thermodynamic conditions on scales well-matched to the jets, lobes and gas disturbances produced by them. Athena+ will therefore determine for the first time how jet energy is dissipated and distributed in group and cluster gas, and how a feedback loop operates in group/cluster cores to regulate gas cooling and AGN fuelling. Athena+ will also establish firmly the cumulative impact of powerful radio galaxies on the evolution of baryons from the epoch of group/cluster formation to the present day.
  • X-ray observations of galaxy clusters provide emission measure weighted spectra, arising from a range of density and temperature fluctuations in the intra-cluster medium (ICM). This is fitted to a single temperature plasma emission model to provide an estimate of the gas density and temperature, which are sensitive to the gas inhomogeneities. Therefore, X-ray observations yield a potentially biased estimate of the thermal gas pressure, P_X. At the same time Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) observations directly measure the integrated gas pressure, P_SZ. If the X-ray pressure profiles are strongly biased with respect to the SZ, then one has the possibility to probe the gas inhomogeneities, even at scales unresolved by the current generation of telescopes. At the same time, a weak bias has implications for the interchangeable use of mass proxies like Y_SZ and Y_X as cosmological probes. In this paper we investigate the dependence of the bias, defined as b_P(r)=P_X(r)/P_SZ(r)-1, on the characteristics of fluctuations in the ICM taking into account the correlation between temperature and density fluctuations. We made a simple prediction of the irreducible bias in idealised X-ray vs SZ observations using multi-temperature plasma emission model. We also provide a simple fitting form to estimate the bias given the distribution of fluctuations. Analysing a sample of 16 clusters extracted from hydrodynamical simulations, we find that the median value of bias is within +/-3% within R_500, it decreases to -5% at R_500<r<1.5R_500 and then rises back to ~0% at r >~ 2R_500. The scatter of b_P(r) between individual relaxed clusters is small -- at the level of <0.03 within R_500, but turns significantly larger (0.25) and highly skewed at r>~ 1.5R_500. For any relaxed cluster we find |b_P(r)| < 15% within R_500, across different implementations of input physics in the simulations. [abridged]
  • We present a new method to identify and characterize the structure of the intracluster medium (ICM) in simulated galaxy clusters. The method uses the median of gas properties, such as density and pressure, which we show to be very robust to the presence of gas inhomogeneities. In particular, we show that the radial profiles of median gas properties are smooth and do not exhibit fluctuations at locations of massive clumps in contrast to mean and mode properties. It is shown that distribution of gas properties in a given radial shell can be well described by a log-normal PDF and a tail. The former corresponds to a nearly hydrostatic bulk component, accounting for ~99% of the volume, while the tail corresponds to high density inhomogeneities. We show that this results in a simple and robust separation of the diffuse and clumpy components of the ICM. The FWHM of the density distribution grows with radius and varies from ~0.15 dex in cluster centre to ~0.5 dex at 2r_500 in relaxed clusters. The small scatter in the width between relaxed clusters suggests that the degree of inhomogeneity is a robust characteristic of the ICM. It broadly agrees with the amplitude of density perturbations in the Coma cluster. We discuss the origin of ICM density variations in spherical shells and show that less than 20% of the width can be attributed to the triaxiality of the cluster gravitational potential. As a link to X-ray observations of real clusters we evaluated the ICM clumping factor with and without high density inhomogeneities. We argue that these two cases represent upper and lower limits on the departure of the observed X-ray emissivity from the median value. We find that the typical value of the clumping factor in the bulk component of relaxed clusters varies from ~1.1-1.2 at r_500 up to ~1.3-1.4 at r_200, in broad agreement with recent observations.
  • X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core ($650 \times 650$ kpc) region of the Coma cluster observed with XMM-Newton and Chandra are analyzed using a 2D power spectrum approach. The resulting 2D spectra are converted to 3D power spectra of gas density fluctuations. Our independent analyses of the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations are in excellent agreement and provide the most sensitive measurements of surface brightness and density fluctuations for a hot cluster. We find that the characteristic amplitude of the volume filling density fluctuations relative to the smooth underlying density distribution varies from 7-10% on scales of $\sim$500 kpc down to $\sim$5% at scales $\sim$ 30 kpc. On smaller spatial scales, projection effects smear the density fluctuations by a large factor, precluding strong limits on the fluctuations in 3D. On the largest scales probed (hundreds of kpc), the dominant contributions to the observed fluctuations most likely arise from perturbations of the gravitational potential by the two most massive galaxies in Coma, NGC4874 and NGC4889, and the low entropy gas brought to the cluster by an infalling group. Other plausible sources of X-ray surface brightness fluctuations are discussed, including turbulence, metal abundance variations, and unresolved sources. Despite a variety of possible origins for density fluctuations, the gas in the Coma cluster core is remarkably homogeneous on scales from $\sim$ 500 to $\sim$30 kpc.
  • The interstellar and intra-cluster medium in giant elliptical galaxies and clusters of galaxies is often assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium. Numerical simulations, however, show that about 5-30% of the pressure in a cluster is provided by turbulence induced by, for example, the central AGN and merger activity. We aim to put constraints on the turbulent velocities and turbulent pressure in the ICM of the giant elliptical galaxies NGC 5044 and NGC 5813 using XMM-Newton RGS observations. The magnitude of the turbulence is estimated using the Fe XVII lines at 15.01 A, 17.05 A, and 17.10 A in the RGS spectra. At low turbulent velocities, the gas becomes optically thick in the 15.01 A line due to resonant scattering, while the 17 A lines remain optically thin. By comparing the (I(17.05)+I(17.10))/I(15.01) line ratio from RGS with simulated line ratios for different Mach numbers, the level of turbulence is constrained. The measurement is limited by systematic uncertainties in the atomic data, which are at the 20-30% level. We find that the line ratio in NGC 5813 is significantly higher than in NGC 5044. This difference can be explained by a higher level of turbulence in NGC 5044. The high turbulent velocities and the fraction of the turbulent pressure support of >40% in NGC 5044, assuming isotropic turbulence, confirm that it is a highly disturbed system, probably due to an off-axis merger. The turbulent pressure support in NGC 5813 is more modest at 15-45%. The (I(17.05)+I(17.10))/I(15.01) line ratio in an optically thin plasma, calculated using AtomDB v2.0.1, is 2 sigma above the ratio measured in NGC 5044, which cannot be explained by resonant scattering. This shows that the discrepancies between theoretical, laboratory, and astrophysical data on Fe XVII lines need to be reduced to improve the accuracy of the determination of turbulent velocities using resonant scattering.
  • The determination of characteristic amplitudes and anisotropy of hot gas motions in galaxy clusters from observations of the brightest resonance lines is discussed. Gas motions affect (i) the spectral line shape through the Doppler effect and (ii) the radial surface brightness profiles in lines during resonant scattering. Radiative transfer calculations have been performed by the Monte Carlo method in the FeXXV resonance line at 6.7 eV for the Perseus cluster (Abell426). It was shown that (a) radial motions reduce the scattering efficiency much more dramatically than purely tangential motions; (b) large-scale gas motions weakly affect the scattering efficiency. The uncertainty in measuring the characteristics of gas motions using resonant scattering has been estimated for existing and future observations of clusters.
  • We discuss various possibilities to constrain ICM turbulence in galaxy clusters using bright X-ray lines. Numerical simulations are used to find the most appropriate description of the 3D velocity field power spectrum (PDS) and to calibrate the relation of observables to this PDS. The impact of the velocity field on the surface brightness distribution and on the spectral shape of strong X-ray lines, modified by the resonant scattering (RS), is evaluated via radiative transfer calculations. We investigate the sensitivity of RS not only to amplitudes of motions, but also to anisotropy and spatial scales. We in particular show that the amplitude of radial motions is most important for RS, while tangential motions only weakly affect the scattering.
  • While very often a hot intergalactic medium (IGM) is optically thin to continuum radiation, the optical depth in resonant lines can be of order unity or larger. Resonant scattering in the brightest X-ray emission lines can cause distortions in the surface brightness distribution, spurious variations in the abundance of heavy elements, changes in line spectral shapes and even polarization of line emission. The magnitude of these effects not only depends on the density, temperature and ionization state of the gas, but is also sensitive to the characteristics of the gas velocity field. This opens a possibility to use resonant scattering as a convenient and powerful tool to study IGM properties. We discuss the application of these effects to galaxy clusters.
  • The dense cores of X-ray emitting gaseous halos of large elliptical galaxies with temperatures below about 0.8 keV show two prominent Fe XVII emission features, which provide a sensitive diagnostic tool to measure the effects of resonant scattering. We present here high-resolution spectra of five bright nearby elliptical galaxies, obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometers (RGS) on the XMM-Newton satellite. The spectra for the cores of four of the galaxies show the Fe XVII line at 15.01 Angstrom being suppressed by resonant scattering. The data for NGC 4636 in particular allow the effects of resonant scattering to be studied in detail and to prove that the 15.01 Angstrom line is suppressed only in the dense core and not in the surrounding regions. Using deprojected density and temperature profiles for this galaxy obtained with the Chandra satellite, we model the radial intensity profiles of the strongest resonance lines, accounting for the effects of resonant scattering, for different values of the characteristic turbulent velocity. Comparing the model to the data, we find that the isotropic turbulent velocities on spatial scales smaller than about 1 kpc are less than 100 km/s and the turbulent pressure support in the galaxy core is smaller than 5% of the thermal pressure at the 90% confidence level, and less than 20% at 95% confidence. Neglecting the effects of resonant scattering in spectral fitting of the inner 2 kpc core of NGC 4636 will lead to underestimates of the chemical abundances of Fe and O by ~10-20%.