• We are investigating the formation and evolution of dust around the hydrogen-deficient supergiants known as R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars. We aim to determine the connection between the probable merger past of these stars and their current dust-production activities. We carried out high-angular resolution interferometric observations of three RCB stars, namely RY Sgr, V CrA, and V854 Cen with the mid-IR interferometer, MIDI on the VLTI, using two telescope pairs. The baselines ranged from 30 to 60 m, allowing us to probe the dusty environment at very small spatial scales (~ 50 mas or 400 stellar radii). The observations of the RCB star dust environments were interpreted using both geometrical models and one-dimensional radiative transfer codes. From our analysis we find that asymmetric circumstellar material is apparent in RY Sgr, may also exist in V CrA, and is possible for V854 Cen. Overall, we find that our observations are consistent with dust forming in clumps ejected randomly around the RCB star so that over time they create a spherically symmetric distribution of dust. However, we conclude that the determination of whether there is a preferred plane of dust ejection must wait until a time series of observations are obtained.
  • Aims.Analysis of the innermost regions of the carbon-rich star IRC+10216 and of the outer layers of its circumstellar envelope have been performed in order to constrain its mass-loss history. Methods: .We analyzed the high dynamic range of near-infrared adaptive optics and the deep V-band images of the circumstellar envelope of IRC+10216 using high angular resolution, collected with the VLT/NACO and FORS1 instruments. Results: .From the near-infrared observations, we present maps of the sub-arcsecond structures, or clumps, in the innermost regions. The morphology of these clumps is found to strongly vary from J- to L-band. Their relative motion appears to be more complex than proposed in earlier works: they can be weakly accelerated, have a constant velocity, or even be motionless with respect to one another. From V-band imaging, we present a high spatial resolution map of the shell distribution in the outer layers of IRC+10216. Shells are resolved well up to a distance of about 90'' to the core of the nebula and most of them appear to be composed of thinner elongated shells. Finally, by combining the NACO and FORS1 images, a global view is present to show both the extended layers and the bipolar core of the nebula together with the real size of the inner clumps. Conclusions: .This study confirms the rather complex nature of the IRC+10216 circumstellar environment. In particular, the coexistence at different spatial scales of structures with very different morphologies (clumps, bipolarity, and almost spherical external layers) is very puzzling. This confirms that the formation of AGB winds is far more complex than usually assumed in current models.
  • R Coronae Borealis variable stars are suspected to sporadically eject optically thick dust clouds causing, when one of them lies on the line-of-sight, a huge brightness decline in visible light. Mid-infrared interferometric observations of RYSgr allowed us to explore the circumstellar regions very close to the central star (~20-40 mas) in order to look for the signature of any heterogeneities. Using the VLTI/MIDI instrument, five dispersed visibility curves were recorded with different projected baselines oriented towards two roughly perpendicular directions. The large spatial frequencies visibility curves exhibit a sinusoidal shape whereas, at shorter spatial frequencies visibility curves follow a Gaussian decrease. These observations are well interpreted with a geometrical model consisting in a central star surrounded by an extended circumstellar envelope in which one bright cloud is embedded. Within this simple geometrical scheme, the inner 110AU dusty environment of RYSgr is dominated at the time of observations by a single dusty cloud which, at 10mic represents ~10% of the total flux of the whole system. The cloud is located at about 100stellar radii from the centre toward the East-North-East direction (or the symmetric direction with respect to centre) within a circumstellar envelope which FWHM is about 120stellar radii. This first detection of a cloud so close to the central star, supports the classical scenario of the RCrB brightness variations in the optical spectral domain.