• The ubiquity of filamentary structure at various scales through out the Galaxy has triggered a renewed interest in their formation, evolution, and role in star formation. The largest filaments can reach up to Galactic scale as part of the spiral arm structure. However, such large scale filaments are hard to identify systematically due to limitations in identifying methodology (i.e., as extinction features). We present a new approach to directly search for the largest, coldest, and densest filaments in the Galaxy, making use of sensitive Herschel Hi-GAL data complemented by spectral line cubes. We present a sample of the 9 most prominent Herschel filaments, including 6 identified from a pilot search field plus 3 from outside the field. These filaments measure 37-99 pc long and 0.6-3.0 pc wide with masses (0.5-8.3)$\times10^4 \, M_\odot$, and beam-averaged ($28"$, or 0.4-0.7 pc) peak H$_2$ column densities of (1.7-9.3)$\times 10^{22} \, \rm{cm^{-2}}$. The bulk of the filaments are relatively cold (17-21 K), while some local clumps have a dust temperature up to 25-47 K. All the filaments are located within <~60 pc from the Galactic mid-plane. Comparing the filaments to a recent spiral arm model incorporating the latest parallax measurements, we find that 7/9 of them reside within arms, but most are close to arm edges. These filaments are comparable in length to the Galactic scale height and therefore are not simply part of a grander turbulent cascade.
  • GRB 111209A is the longest ever recorded burst. This burst was detected by Swift and Konus-Wind, and we obtained TOO time from XMM-Newton as well as prompt data from TAROT. We made a common reduction using data from these instruments together with other ones. This allows for the first time a precise study at high signal-to-noise ratio of the prompt to afterglow transition. We show that several mechanisms are responsible of this phase. In its prompt phase, we show that its duration is longer than 20 000 seconds. This, combined with the fact that the burst fluence is among the top 5% of what is observed for other events, makes this event extremely energetic. We discuss the possible progenitors that could explain the extreme duration properties of this burst as well as its spectral properties. We present evidences that this burst belong to a new, previously unidentified, class of GRBs. The most probable progenitor of this new class is a low metalicity blue super-giant star. We show that selection effects could prevent the detection of other bursts at larger redshift and conclude that this kind of event is intrinsically rare in the local Universe. The afterglow presents similar features to other normal long GRBs and a late rebrightening in the optical wavelengths, as observed in other long GRBs. A broad band SED from radio to X-rays at late times does not show significant deviations from the expected standard fireball afterglow synchrotron emission.
  • We present new Herschel-SPIRE imaging spectroscopy (194-671 microns) of the bright starburst galaxy M82. Covering the CO ladder from J=4-3 to J=13-12, spectra were obtained at multiple positions for a fully sampled ~ 3 x 3 arcminute map, including a longer exposure at the central position. We present measurements of 12CO, 13CO, [CI], [NII], HCN, and HCO+ in emission, along with OH+, H2O+ and HF in absorption and H2O in both emission and absorption, with discussion. We use a radiative transfer code and Bayesian likelihood analysis to model the temperature, density, column density, and filling factor of multiple components of molecular gas traced by 12CO and 13CO, adding further evidence to the high-J lines tracing a much warmer (~ 500 K), less massive component than the low-J lines. The addition of 13CO (and [CI]) is new and indicates that [CI] may be tracing different gas than 12CO. No temperature/density gradients can be inferred from the map, indicating that the single-pointing spectrum is descriptive of the bulk properties of the galaxy. At such a high temperature, cooling is dominated by molecular hydrogen. Photon-dominated region (PDR) models require higher densities than those indicated by our Bayesian likelihood analysis in order to explain the high-J CO line ratios, though cosmic-ray enhanced PDR models can do a better job reproducing the emission at lower densities. Shocks and turbulent heating are likely required to explain the bright high-J emission.
  • We study the stellar population far into the halo of one of the two brightest galaxies in the Coma cluster, NGC 4889, based on deep medium resolution spectroscopy with FOCAS at the Subaru 8.2m telescope. We fit single stellar population models to the measured line-strength (Lick) indices (Hbeta, Mgb, [MgFe]' and <Fe>). Combining with literature data, we construct radial profiles of metallicity, [alpha/Fe] element abundance ratio and age for NGC 4889, from the center out to ~60 kpc (~4Re). We find evidence for different chemical and star formation histories for stars inside and outside 1.2Re = 18 kpc radius. The inner regions are characterized by a steep [Z/H] gradient and high [alpha/Fe] at ~2.5 times solar value. In the halo, between 18 and 60 kpc, the [Z/H] is near-solar with a shallow gradient, while [alpha/Fe] shows a strong negative gradient, reaching solar values at ~60 kpc. We interpret these data in terms of different formation histories for both components. The data for the inner galaxy are consistent with a rapid, quasi-monolithic, dissipative merger origin at early redshifts, followed by one or at most a few dry mergers. Those for the halo argue for later accretion of stars from old systems with more extended star formation histories. The half-light radius of the inner component alone is estimated as ~6 kpc, suggesting a significantly smaller size of this galaxy in the past. This may be the local stellar population signature of the size evolution found for early-type galaxies from high-redshift observations.
  • Our knowledge of the optical spectra of Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) is limited by their intrinsic faintness. Among the fourteen optically identified INSs, medium resolution spectra have been obtained only for a handful of objects. No spectrum has been published yet for the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45), the third brightest (V=23.6) INS with an optical counterpart. Optical multi-band photometry underlines a flat continuum.In this work we present the first optical spectroscopy observations of the Vela pulsar, performed in the 4000-11000 A spectral range.Our observations have been performed at the ESO VLT using the FORS2 instrument. The spectrum of the Vela pulsar is characterized by a flat power-law (alpha = -0.04 +/- 0.04), which compares well with the values obtained from broad-band photometry. This confirms, once more, that the optical emission of Vela is entirely of magnetospheric origin. The comparison between the optical spectral indeces of rotation-powered INSs does not show evidence for a spectral evolution suggesting that, as in the X-rays, the INS aging does not affect the spectral properties of the magnetospheric emission. At the same time, the optical spectral indeces are found to be nearly always flatter then the X-rays ones, clearly suggesting a general spectral turnover at lower energies.
  • (Abridged) We present a detailed study of the host galaxy of GRB 011121 (at z = 0.36) based on high-resolution imaging in 5 broad-band, optical and near-infrared filters with HST and VLT/ISAAC. The surface brightness profile of this galaxy is best fitted by a Sersic law with index ~ 2 - 2.5 and a rather large effective radius (~ 7.5 kpc). Both the morphological analysis and the F450W - F702W colour image suggest that the host galaxy of GRB 011121 is either a disk-system with a rather small bulge, or one hosting a central, dust-enshrouded starburst. Hence, we modeled the integrated spectral energy distribution of this galaxy by combining stellar population and radiative transfer models, assuming properties representative of nearby starburst or normal star-forming, Sbc-like galaxies. A range of plausible fitting solutions indicates that the host galaxy of GRB 011121 has a stellar mass of 3.1 - 6.9 x10^9 Msun, stellar populations with a maximum age ranging from 0.4 to 2 Gyr, and a metallicity ranging from 1 to 29 per cent of the solar value. Starburst models suggest this galaxy to be nearly as opaque as local starbursts (with an A_V = 0.27 - 0.76 mag). Alternatively, normal star-forming Sbc-like models suggest a high central opacity whereas A_V = 0.12$ -- 0.57 mag along the line of sight. For this subluminous galaxy (with L_B/Lstar_B = 0.26), we determine a model-dependent SFR of 2.4 - 9.4 Msun/yr. The SFR per unit luminosity (9.2 - 36.1 Msun/yr/(L_B/Lstar_B)) is high compared to those of most GRB host galaxies, but consistent with those of most of the hosts at similar low redshift. Our results suggest that the host galaxy of GRB 011121 is a rather large disk-system in a relatively early phase of its star formation history.
  • Galaxy hierarchical formation theories, numerical simulations, the discovery of the Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy (SagDEG) in 1994 and more recent investigations suggest that the dark halo of the Milky Way can have a rich phenomenology containing non thermalized substructures. In the present preliminary study, we investigate the case of the SagDEG (the best known satellite galaxy in the Milky Way crossing the solar neighbourhood) analyzing the consequences of its dark matter stream contribution to the galactic halo on the basis of the DAMA/NaI annual modulation data. The present analysis is restricted to some WIMP candidates and to some of the astrophysical, nuclear and particle Physics scenarios. Other candidates such as e.g. the light bosonic ones, we discussed elsewhere, and other non thermalized substructures are not yet addressed here.
  • In this paper we review the general properties of X-ray afterglows. We discuss in particular on the powerful diagnostics provided by X-ray afterglows in constraining the environment and fireball in normal GRB, and the implications on the origin of dark GRB and XRF. We also discuss on the observed properties of the transition from the prompt to the afterglow phase, and present a case study for a late X-ray outburst interpreted as the onset of the afterglow stage.
  • We present a mission designed for the study of transient phenomena in the high energy sky, through a wide field X-ray/hard X-ray monitor, and fast (< 1 min) follow up observations with Narrow Field Instrumentation. This is based on an X-ray telescope with an area of 1000 cm2, equipped with high-resolution spectroscopy microcalorimeters and X-ray polarimeter. The performances of the mission on the physics of GRB and their use as cosmological probes are presented and discussed.
  • We have obtained intermediate-resolution VLT spectroscopy of 75 globular cluster candidates around the Sa galaxy M104 (NGC4594). Fifty-seven candidates out to ~ 40 kpc in the halo of the galaxy were confirmed to be bona-fide globular clusters, 27 of which are new. A first analysis of the velocities provides only marginal evidence for rotation of the cluster system. From Hbeta line strengths, almost all of the clusters in our sample have ages that are consistent, within the errors, with Milky Way globular clusters. Only a few clusters may be 1-2 Gyr old, and bulge and halo clusters appear coeval. The absorption line indices follow the correlations established for the Milky Way clusters. Metallicities are derived based upon new empirical calibrations with Galactic globular clusters taking into account the non-linear behavior of some indices (e.g., Mg2). Our sample of globular clusters in NGC4594 spans a metallicity range of -2.13 < [Fe/H] < +0.26 dex, and the median metallicity of the system is [Fe/H] = -0.85. Thus, our data provide evidence that some of the clusters have super-solar metallicity. Overall, the abundance distribution of the cluster system is consistent with a bimodal distribution with peaks at [Fe/H] ~- 1.7 and -0.7. However, the radial change in the metallicity distribution of clusters may not be straightforwardly explained by a varying mixture of two sub-populations of red and blue clusters.
  • We present preliminary results of a wide field study of the globular cluster system of NGC4594, the Sombrero galaxy. The galaxy was observed in B, V, and R using the Wide Field Imager on the ESO 2.2m telescope. Using color and shape criteria to select a sample of highly probable globular cluster candidates, we measured the radial density profile of clusters out to 40' (100 Kpc) in the galaxy halo. The colors are consistent with the bimodal color distribution observed in previous studies. The red cluster candidates show a clear central concentration relative to the blue clusters. The population of red clusters does not appear significantly flattened, thus indicating that they are associated to the galaxy bulge rather than to the disk.