• Quantum memory capable of storage and retrieval of flying photons on demand is crucial in developing quantum information technologies. In particular, to build efficient quantum computers and long-distance quantum communications, a broadband and room-temperature quantum memory associated with enabled quantum networks is of practical significance. Here, we present the first hybrid quantum memory enabled network by demonstrating two types of quantum memory building blocks and their interconnecting: an atomic-ensemble-based memory capable of generating and storing single atomic excitations which can then be converted to single photons, and an all-optical loop memory for mapping incoming photons in and out on demand, at room-temperature and with a broad acceptance bandwidth. Cascading these two types of quantum memories, we observe a well-preserved herald-single quantum cross-correlation, reaching a value of 22, and a violation of the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality up to 549 standard deviations. Such a network allows atomic excitations to be generated, stored, and converted to broadband photons, which are then transferred to the next node, stored, and faithfully retrieved, all at high speed and in a programmable fashion. The simultaneously demonstrated two type of quantum memories constitute a complete set for constructing a hybrid quantum network, representing a substantial step towards scalable quantum information processing.
  • We propose and demonstrate a modular architecture for reconfigurable on-chip linear-optical circuits. Each module contains 10 independent phase-controlled Mach-Zehnder interferometers; several such modules can be connected to each other to build large reconfigurable interferometers. With this architecture, large interferometers are easier to build and characterize than with traditional, bespoke, monolithic designs. We demonstrate our approach by fabricating three modules in the form of UV-written silica-on-silicon chips. We characterize these chips, connect them to each other, and implement a wide range of linear optical transformations. We envisage that this architecture will enable many future experiments in quantum optics.
  • We study the impact of experimental imperfections on a recently proposed protocol for performing quantum simulations of vibronic spectroscopy. Specifically, we propose a method for quantifying the impact of these imperfections, optimizing an experiment to account for them, and benchmarking the results against a classical simulation method. We illustrate our findings using a proof of principle experimental simulation of part of the vibronic spectrum of tropolone. Our findings will inform the design of future experiments aiming to simulate the spectra of large molecules beyond the reach of current classical computers.
  • We report a single-stage bi-directional interface capable of linking Sr$^+$ trapped ion qubits in a long-distance quantum network. Our interface converts photons between the Sr$^+$ emission wavelength at 422 nm and the telecoms C-band to enable low-loss transmission over optical fiber. We have achieved both up- and down-conversion at the single photon level with efficiencies of 9.4 $\%$ and 1.1 $\%$ respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the noise introduced during the conversion process is sufficiently low to implement high-fidelity interconnects suitable for quantum networking.
  • The heat engine, a machine that extracts useful work from thermal sources, is one of the basic theoretical constructs and fundamental applications of classical thermodynamics. The classical description of a heat engine does not include coherence in its microscopic degrees of freedom. By contrast, a quantum heat engine might possess coherence between its internal states. Although the Carnot efficiency cannot be surpassed, and coherence can be performance degrading in certain conditions, it was recently predicted that even when using only thermal resources, internal coherence can enable a quantum heat engine to produce more power than any classical heat engine using the same resources. Such a power boost therefore constitutes a quantum thermodynamic signature. It has also been shown that the presence of coherence results in the thermodynamic equivalence of different quantum heat engine types, an effect with no classical counterpart. Microscopic heat machines have been recently implemented with trapped ions, and proposals for heat machines using superconducting circuits and optomechanics have been made. When operated with standard thermal baths, however, the machines implemented so far have not demonstrated any inherently quantum feature in their thermodynamic quantities. Here we implement two types of quantum heat engines by use of an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, and experimentally demonstrate both the coherence power boost and the equivalence of different heat-engine types. This constitutes the first observation of quantum thermodynamic signatures in heat machines.
  • We study different notions of quantum correlations in multipartite systems of distinguishable and indistinguishable particles. Based on the definition of quantum coherence for a single particle, we consider two possible extensions of this concept to the many-particle scenario and determine the influence of the exchange symmetry. Moreover, we characterize the relation of multiparticle coherence to the entanglement of the compound quantum system. To support our general treatment with examples, we consider the quantum correlations of a collection of qudits. The impact of local and global quantum superpositions on the different forms of quantum correlations is discussed. For differently correlated states in the bipartite and multipartite scenarios, we provide a comprehensive characterization of the various forms and origins of quantum correlations.
  • In this work, we demonstrate a new way to perform classical multiparty computing amongst parties with limited computational resources. Our method harnesses quantum resources to increase the computational power of the individual parties. We show how a set of clients restricted to linear classical processing are able to jointly compute a non-linear multivariable function that lies beyond their individual capabilities. The clients are only allowed to perform classical XOR gates and single-qubit gates on quantum states. We also examine the type of security that can be achieved in this limited setting. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation using photonic qubits, that allows four clients to compute a specific example of a multiparty function, the pairwise AND.
  • We demonstrate how boson sampling with photons of partial distinguishability can be expressed in terms of interference of fewer photons. We use this observation to propose a classical algorithm to simulate the output of a boson sampler fed with photons of partial distinguishability. We find conditions for which this algorithm is efficient, which gives a lower limit on the required indistinguishability to demonstrate a quantum advantage. Under these conditions, adding more photons only polynomially increases the computational cost to simulate a boson sampling experiment.
  • It has recently been shown that optical parametric oscillator (OPO) Ising machines, consisting of coupled optical pulses circulating in a cavity with parametric gain, can be used to probabilistically find low-energy states of Ising spin systems. In this work, we study optical Ising machines that operate under simplified Gaussian dynamics. We show that these dynamics are sufficient for reaching probabilities of success comparable to previous work. Based on this result, we propose modified optical Ising machines with simpler designs that do not use parametric gain yet achieve similar performance, thus suggesting a route to building much larger systems.
  • A quantum theory of multiphase estimation is crucial for quantum-enhanced sensing and imaging and may link quantum metrology to more complex quantum computation and communication protocols. In this letter we tackle one of the key difficulties of multiphase estimation: obtaining a measurement which saturates the fundamental sensitivity bounds. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for projective measurements acting on pure states to saturate the maximal theoretical bound on precision given by the quantum Fisher information matrix. We apply our theory to the specific example of interferometric phase estimation using photon number measurements, a convenient choice in the laboratory. Our results thus introduce concepts and methods relevant to the future theoretical and experimental development of multiparameter estimation.
  • We numerically investigate the implementation of Haar-random unitarity transformations and Fourier transformations in photonic devices consisting of beam splitters and phase shifters, which are used for integrated photonics implementations of boson sampling. The distribution of reflectivities required to implement an arbitrary unitary transformation is skewed towards low values, and this skew becomes stronger the larger the number of modes. A realistic implementation using Mach-Zehnder interferometers is incapable of doing this perfectly and thus has limited fidelity. We show that numerical optimisation and adding extra beam splitters to the network can help to restore fidelity.
  • Universal multiport interferometers, which can be programmed to implement any linear transformation between multiple channels, are emerging as a powerful tool for both classical and quantum photonics. These interferometers are typically composed of a regular mesh of beam splitters and phase shifters, allowing for straightforward fabrication using integrated photonic architectures and ready scalability. The current, standard design for universal multiport interferometers is based on work by Reck et al (Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 58, 1994). We demonstrate a new design for universal multiport interferometers based on an alternative arrangement of beam splitters and phase shifters, which outperforms that by Reck et al. Our design occupies half the physical footprint of the Reck design and is significantly more robust to optical losses.
  • Synthesised light sources need reliable diagnostics for effective application to sub-femtosecond control and probing. However, commonly employed self-referencing techniques for pulsed-field characterisation fail in the presence of wide spectral gaps, while direct sampling methods are limited to high intensities. Here, we introduce a new approach labelled SPectral-gap Immune Characterisation of Electric Fields (SPICE), which overcomes these barriers by means of multi-spectral shearing interferometry, using an unknown reference and a reconstruction algorithm that makes use of this redundant information to simultaneously reconstruct the reference and test pulse with high precision and accuracy. We envisage that this technique will help foster new applications for broadband sources.
  • Interference lies at the heart of the behavior of classical and quantum light. It is thus crucial to understand the boundaries between which interference patterns can be explained by a classical electromagnetic description of light and which, on the other hand, can only be understood with a proper quantum mechanical approach. While the case of two-mode interference has received a lot of attention, the multimode case has not yet been fully explored. Here we study a general scenario of intensity interferometry: we derive a bound on the average correlations between pairs of output intensities for the classical wavelike model of light, and we show how it can be violated in a quantum framework. As a consequence, this violation acts as a nonclassicality witness, able to detect the presence of sources with sub-Poissonian photon-number statistics. We also develop a criterion that can certify the impossibility of dividing a given interferometer into two independent subblocks.
  • Quantum interference of two independent particles in pure quantum states is fully described by the particles' distinguishability: the closer the particles are to being identical, the higher the degree of quantum interference. When more than two particles are involved, the situation becomes more complex and interference capability extends beyond pairwise distinguishability, taking on a surprisingly rich character. Here, we study many-particle interference using three photons. We show that the distinguishability between pairs of photons is not sufficient to fully describe the photons' behaviour in a scattering process, but that a collective phase, the triad phase, plays a role. We are able to explore the full parameter space of three-photon interference by generating heralded single photons and interfering them in a fibre tritter. Using multiple degrees of freedom - temporal delays and polarisation - we isolate three-photon interference from two-photon interference. Our experiment disproves the view that pairwise two-photon distinguishability uniquely determines the degree of non-classical many-particle interference.
  • We present an apparatus that converts every pulse of a pulsed light source to a pulse train in which the intensities of the different pulses are samples of the spatial or temporal frequency spectrum of the original pulse. In this way, the spectrum of the incident light can be measured by following the temporal response of a single detector. The apparatus is based on multiple round-trips inside a 2f- cavity-like mirror arrangement in which the spectrum is spread on the back focal plane, where after each round-trip a small section of the spectrum is allowed to escape. The apparatus is fibre-free, offers easy wavelength range tunability, and a prototype built achieves over 10% average efficiency in the near infra red. We demonstrate the application of the prototype for the efficient measurement of the joint spectrum of a non-degenerate bi-photon source in which one of the photons is in the near infra red.
  • Interference between independent single photons is perhaps the most fundamental interaction in quantum optics. It has become increasingly important as a tool for optical quantum information science, as one of the rudimentary quantum operations, together with photon detection, for generating entanglement between non-interacting particles. Despite this, demonstrations of large-scale photonic networks involving more than two independent sources of quantum light have been limited due to the difficulty in constructing large arrays of high-quality single photon sources. Here, we solve the key challenge, reporting a novel array of more than eighteen near-identical, low-loss, high-purity, heralded single photon sources achieved using spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) on a silica chip. We verify source quality through a series of heralded Hong-Ou-Mandel experiments, and further report the experimental three-photon extension of the entire Hong-Ou-Mandel interference curves, which map out the interference landscape between three independent single photon sources for the first time.
  • Multi-photon propagation in connected structures - a quantum walk - offers the potential for simulating complex physical systems and provides a route to universal quantum computation. Increasing the complexity of quantum photonic networks where the walk occurs is essential for many applications. Here, we implement a quantum walk of indistinguishable photon pairs in a multimode fiber supporting 380 modes. Using wavefront shaping, we control the propagation of the two-photon state through the fiber in which all modes are coupled. Excitation of arbitrary output modes of the system is realized by controlling classical and quantum interferences. This experiment demonstrates a highly multimode platform for multi-photon interference experiments and provides a powerful method to program a general high-dimensional multiport optical circuit. This work paves the way for the next generation of photonic devices for quantum simulation, computing and communication.
  • Alkali-filled hollow-core fibres are a promising medium for investigating light-matter interactions, especially at the single-photon level, due to the tight confinement of light and high optical depths achievable by light-induced atomic desorption. However, until now these large optical depths could only be generated for seconds at most once per day, severely limiting the practicality of the technology. Here we report the generation of highest observed transient ($>10^5$ for up to a minute) and highest observed persistent ($>2000$ for hours) optical depths of alkali vapours in a light-guiding geometry to date, using a caesium-filled Kagom\'e-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. Our results pave the way to light-matter interaction experiments in confined geometries requiring long operation times and large atomic number densities, such as generation of single-photon-level nonlinearities and development of single photon quantum memories.
  • We report an experimental realisation of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the single-photon level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of a new equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics.
  • Quantum properties of optical modes are typically assessed by observing their photon statistics or the distribution of their quadratures. Both particle- and wave-like behaviours deliver important information, and each may be used as a resource in quantum-enhanced technologies. Weak-field homodyne detection provides a scheme which combines the wave- and particle-like descriptions. Here we show that it is possible to observe a wave-like property such as the optical coherence across Fock basis states in the detection statistics derived from discrete photon counting. We experimentally demonstrate these correlations using two weak-field homodyne detectors on each mode of two classes of two-mode entangled states. Furthermore, we theoretically describe the response of weak-field homodyne detection on a two-mode squeezed state in the context of generalised Bell inequalities. Our work demonstrates the potential of this technique as a tool for hybrid continuous/discrete-variable protocols on a phenomenon that explicitly combines both approaches.
  • Weak values and measurements have been proposed as means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology, namely, (Q1) Does post-selection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyse these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.
  • We report a comprehensive approach to analysing continuous-output photon detectors. We employ principal component analysis to maximise the information extracted, followed by a novel noise-tolerant parameterised approach to the tomography of PNRDs. We further propose a measure for rigorously quantifying a detector's photon-number-resolving capability. Our approach applies to all detectors with continuous-output signals. We illustrate our methods by applying them to experimental data obtained from a transition-edge sensor (TES) detector.
  • Quantum mechanics establishes the ultimate limit to the scaling of the precision on any parameter, by iden- tifying optimal probe states and measurements. While this paradigm is, at least in principle, adequate for the metrology of quantum channels involving the estimation of phase and loss parameters, we show that estimat- ing the loss parameters associated with a quantum channel and a realistic quantum detector are fundamentally different. While Fock states are provably optimal for the former, we identify a crossover in the nature of the optimal probe state for estimating detector imperfections as a function of the loss parameter. We provide explicit results for on-off and homodyne detectors, the most widely used detectors in quantum photonics technologies.
  • A long-standing question is whether it is possible to delegate computational tasks securely. Recently, both a classical and a quantum solution to this problem were found. Here, we study the interplay of classical and quantum approaches and show how coherence can be used as a tool for secure delegated classical computation. We show that a client with limited computational capacity - restricted to an XOR gate - can perform universal classical computation by manipulating information carriers that may occupy superpositions of two states. Using single photonic qubits or coherent light, we experimentally implement secure delegated classical computations between an independent client and a server. The server has access to the light sources and measurement devices, whereas the client may use only a restricted set of passive optical devices to manipulate the light beams. Thus, our work highlights how minimal quantum and classical resources can be combined and exploited for classical computing.