• Precision cosmology requires accurate galaxy redshifts, but next generation optical surveys will observe unprecedented numbers of resolved galaxies, placing strain on the amount of spectroscopic follow-up required. We show how useful information can be gained on the redshift distributions of optical galaxy samples from spatial cross-correlations with intensity maps of unresolved HI (21cm) spectral line emission. We construct a redshift distribution estimator, which we test using simulations. We utilise the S3-SAX catalogue which includes HI emission information for each galaxy, which we use to construct HI intensity maps. We also make use of simulated LSST and Euclid-like photometry enabling us to apply the HI clustering calibration to realistic simulated photometric redshifts. While taking into account important limitations to HI intensity mapping such as lost k-modes from foreground cleaning and poor angular resolution due to large receiver beams, we show that excellent constraints on redshift distributions can be provided for an optical photometric sample.
  • We introduce a new Bayesian HI spectral line fitting technique capable of obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for millions of galaxies in radio surveys with the Square Kilometere Array (SKA). This technique is especially well-suited to the low signal-to-noise regime that the redshifted 21-cm HI emission line is expected to be observed in, especially with SKA Phase 1, allowing for robust source detection. After selecting a set of continuum objects relevant to large, cosmological-scale surveys with the first phase of the SKA dish array (SKA1-MID), we simulate data corresponding to their HI line emission as observed by the same telescope. We then use the MultiNest nested sampling code to find the best-fitting parametrised line profile, providing us with a full joint posterior probability distribution for the galaxy properties, including redshift. This provides high quality redshifts, with redshift errors $\Delta z / z <10^{-5}$, from radio data alone for some 1.8 million galaxies in a representative 5000 square degree survey with the SKA1-MID instrument with up-to-date sensitivity profiles. Interestingly, we find that the SNR definition commonly used in forecast papers does not correlate well with the actual detectability of an HI line using our method. We further detail how our method could be improved with per-object priors and how it may be also used to give robust constraints on other observables such as the HI mass function. We also make our line fitting code publicly available for application to other data sets.
  • We consider methods with which to answer the question "is any observed galaxy cluster too unusual for Lambda-CDM?" After emphasising that many previous attempts to answer this question will overestimate the confidence level at which Lambda-CDM can be ruled out, we outline a consistent approach to these rare clusters, which allows the question to be answered. We define three statistical measures, each of which are sensitive to changes in cluster populations arising from different modifications to the cosmological model. We also use these properties to define the 'equivalent mass at redshift zero' for a cluster --- the mass of an equally unusual cluster today. This quantity is independent of the observational survey in which the cluster was found, which makes it an ideal proxy for ranking the relative unusualness of clusters detected by different surveys. These methods are then used on a comprehensive sample of observed galaxy clusters and we confirm that all are less than 2-sigma deviations from the Lambda-CDM expectation. Whereas we have only applied our method to galaxy clusters, it is applicable to any isolated, collapsed, halo. As motivation for future surveys, we also calculate where in the mass redshift plane the rarest halo is most likely to be found, giving information as to which objects might be the most fruitful in the search for new physics.
  • We investigate the correlations in galaxy shapes between optical and radio wavelengths using archival observations of the COSMOS field. Cross-correlation studies between different wavebands will become increasingly important for precision cosmology as future large surveys may be dominated by systematic rather than statistical errors. In the case of weak lensing, galaxy shapes must be measured to extraordinary accuracy (shear systematics of $< 0.01\%$) in order to achieve good constraints on dark energy parameters. By using shape information from overlapping surveys in optical and radio bands, robustness to systematics may be significantly improved without loss of constraining power. Here we use HST-ACS optical data, VLA radio data, and extensive simulations to investigate both our ability to make precision measurements of source shapes from realistic radio data, and to constrain the intrinsic astrophysical scatter between the shapes of galaxies as measured in the optical and radio wavebands. By producing a new image from the VLA-COSMOS L-band radio visibility data that is well suited to galaxy shape measurements, we are able to extract precise measurements of galaxy position angles. Comparing to corresponding measurements from the HST optical image, we set a lower limit on the intrinsic astrophysical scatter in position angles, between the optical and radio bands, of $\sigma_\alpha > 0.212\pi$ radians (or $38.2^{\circ}$) at a $95\%$ confidence level.
  • In this third paper of a series on radio weak lensing for cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array, we scrutinise synergies between cosmic shear measurements in the radio and optical/near-IR bands for mitigating systematic effects. We focus on three main classes of systematics: (i) experimental systematic errors in the observed shear; (ii) signal contamination by intrinsic alignments; and (iii) systematic effects due to an incorrect modelling of non-linear scales. First, we show that a comprehensive, multi-wavelength analysis provides a self-calibration method for experimental systematic effects, only implying <50% increment on the errors on cosmological parameters. We also illustrate how the cross-correlation between radio and optical/near-IR surveys alone is able to remove residual systematics with variance as large as 0.00001, i.e. the same order of magnitude of the cosmological signal. This also opens the possibility of using such a cross-correlation as a means to detect unknown experimental systematics. Secondly, we demonstrate that, thanks to polarisation information, radio weak lensing surveys will be able to mitigate contamination by intrinsic alignments, in a way similar but fully complementary to available self-calibration methods based on position-shear correlations. Lastly, we illustrate how radio weak lensing experiments, reaching higher redshifts than those accessible to optical surveys, will probe dark energy and the growth of cosmic structures in regimes less contaminated by non-linearities in the matter perturbations. For instance, the higher-redshift bins of radio catalogues peak at z~0.8-1, whereas their optical/near-IR counterparts are limited to z<0.5-0.7. This translates into having a cosmological signal 2 to 5 times less contaminated by non-linear perturbations.
  • We construct forecasts for cosmological parameter constraints from weak gravitational lensing surveys involving the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Considering matter content, dark energy and modified gravity parameters, we show that the first phase of the SKA (SKA1) can be competitive with other Stage III experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and that the full SKA (SKA2) can potentially form tighter constraints than Stage IV optical weak lensing experiments, such as those that will be conducted with LSST, WFIRST-AFTA or Euclid-like facilities. Using weak lensing alone, going from SKA1 to SKA2 represents improvements by factors of $\sim10$ in matter, $\sim10$ in dark energy and $\sim5$ in modified gravity parameters. We also show, for the first time, the powerful result that comparably tight constraints (within $\sim5\%$) for both Stage III and Stage IV experiments, can be gained from cross-correlating shear maps between the optical and radio wavebands, a process which can also eliminate a number of potential sources of systematic errors which can otherwise limit the utility of weak lensing cosmology.
  • We construct a pipeline for simulating weak lensing cosmology surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), taking as inputs telescope sensitivity curves; correlated source flux, size and redshift distributions; a simple ionospheric model; source redshift and ellipticity measurement errors. We then use this simulation pipeline to optimise a 2-year weak lensing survey performed with the first deployment of the SKA (SKA1). Our assessments are based on the total signal-to-noise of the recovered shear power spectra, a metric that we find to correlate very well with a standard dark energy figure of merit. We first consider the choice of frequency band, trading off increases in number counts at lower frequencies against poorer resolution; our analysis strongly prefers the higher frequency Band 2 (950-1760 MHz) channel of the SKA-MID telescope to the lower frequency Band 1 (350-1050 MHz). Best results would be obtained by allowing the centre of Band 2 to shift towards lower frequency, around 1.1 GHz. We then move on to consider survey size, finding that an area of 5,000 square degrees is optimal for most SKA1 instrumental configurations. Finally, we forecast the performance of a weak lensing survey with the second deployment of the SKA. The increased survey size (3$\pi$\,steradian) and sensitivity improves both the signal-to-noise and the dark energy metrics by two orders of magnitude.
  • This document was submitted as supporting material to an Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). This ECP requests gridded visibilities as an extra imaging data product from the SKA, in order to enable bespoke analysis techniques to measure source morphologies to the accuracy necessary for precision cosmology with radio weak lensing. We also discuss the properties of an SKA weak lensing data set and potential overlaps with other cosmology science goals.
  • Weak gravitational lensing measurements are traditionally made at optical wavelengths where many highly resolved galaxy images are readily available. However, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) holds great promise for this type of measurement at radio wavelengths owing to its greatly increased sensitivity and resolution over typical radio surveys. The key to successful weak lensing experiments is in measuring the shapes of detected sources to high accuracy. In this document we describe a simulation pipeline designed to simulate radio images of the quality required for weak lensing, and will be typical of SKA observations. We provide as input, images with realistic galaxy shapes which are then simulated to produce images as they would have been observed with a given radio interferometer. We exploit this pipeline to investigate various stages of a weak lensing experiment in order to better understand the effects that may impact shape measurement. We first show how the proposed SKA1-Mid array configurations perform when we compare the (known) input and output ellipticities. We then investigate how making small changes to these array configurations impact on this input-outut ellipticity comparison. We also demonstrate how alternative configurations for SKA1-Mid that are smaller in extent, and with a faster survey speeds produce similar performance to those originally proposed. We then show how a notional SKA configuration performs in the same shape measurement challenge. Finally, we describe ongoing efforts to utilise our simulation pipeline to address questions relating to how applicable current (mostly originating from optical data) shape measurement techniques are to future radio surveys. As an alternative to such image plane techniques, we lastly discuss a shape measurement technique based on the shapelets formalism that reconstructs the source shapes directly from the visibility data.
  • Motivated by recent suggestions that a number of observed galaxy clusters have masses which are too high for their given redshift to occur naturally in a standard model cosmology, we use Extreme Value Statistics to construct confidence regions in the mass-redshift plane for the most extreme objects expected in the universe. We show how such a diagram not only provides a way of potentially ruling out the concordance cosmology, but also allows us to differentiate between alternative models of enhanced structure formation. We compare our theoretical prediction with observations, placing currently observed high and low redshift clusters on a mass-redshift diagram and find -- provided we consider the full sky to avoid a posteriori selection effects -- that none are in significant tension with concordance cosmology.
  • Motivated by observations that suggest the presence of extremely massive clusters at uncomfortably high redshifts for the standard cosmological model to explain, we develop a theoretical framework for the study of the most massive haloes, e.g. the most massive cluster found in a given volume, based on Extreme Value Statistics (EVS). We proceed from the exact distribution of the extreme values drawn from a known underlying distribution, rather than relying on asymptotic theory (which is independent of the underlying form), arguing that the former is much more likely to furnish robust statistical results. We illustrate this argument with a discussion of the use of extreme value statistics as a probe of primordial non-Gaussianity.