• The Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593 was monitored spectroscopically with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of a reverberation mapping campaign that also included Swift, Kepler and ground-based photometric monitoring. During 2016 July 12 - August 6, we obtained 26 spectra across a nearly continuous wavelength range of ~1150 - 10,000A. These were combined with Swift data to produce a UV/optical "lag spectrum", which shows the interband lag relative to the Swift UVW2 band as a function of wavelength. The broad shape of the lag spectrum appears to follow the $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$ relation seen previously in photometric interband lag measurements of other active galactic nuclei (AGN). This shape is consistent with the standard thin disk model but the magnitude of the lags implies a disk that is a factor of ~3 larger than predicted, again consistent with what has been previously seen in other AGN. In all cases these large disk sizes, which are also implied by independent gravitational microlensing of higher-mass AGN, cannot be simply reconciled with the standard model. However the most striking feature in this higher resolution lag spectrum is a clear excess around the 3646A Balmer jump. This strongly suggests that diffuse emission from gas in the much larger broad-line region (BLR) must also contribute significantly to the interband lags. While the relative contributions of the disk and BLR cannot be uniquely determined in these initial measurements, it is clear that both will need to be considered in comprehensively modeling and understanding AGN lag spectra.
  • We present new observations of the GOODS-N field obtained at 5.5 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The central region of the field was imaged to a median r.m.s. of 3 microJy/beam with a resolution of 0.5 arcsec. From a 14-arcmin diameter region we extracted a sample of 94 radio sources with signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5. Near-IR identifications are available for about 88 percent of the radio sources. We used different multi-band diagnostics to separate active galactic nuclei (AGN), both radiatively efficient and inefficient, from star-forming galaxies. From our analysis, we find that about 80 percent of our radio-selected sample is AGN-dominated, with the fraction raising to 92 percent when considering only the radio sources with redshift >1.5. This large fraction of AGN-dominated radio sources at very low flux densities (the median flux density at 5.5 GHz is 42 microJy), where star-forming galaxies are expected to dominate, is somewhat surprising and at odds with other results. Our interpretation is that both the frequency and angular resolution of our radio observations strongly select against radio sources whose brightness distribution is diffuse on scale of several kpc. Indeed, we find that the median angular sizes of the AGN-dominated sources is around 0.2-0.3 arcsec against 0.8 arcsec for star-forming galaxies. This highlights the key role that high frequency radio observations can play in pinpointing AGN-driven radio emission at microJy levels. This work is part of the eMERGE legacy project.
  • We have compiled a new multiwavelength spectral energy distribution (SED) for the closest obscured low-ionization emission-line region active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 4736, also known as M94. The SED comprises mainly high-resolution (mostly sub-arcsecond, or, at the distance to M94, <23 pc from the nucleus) observations from the literature, archival data, as well as previously unpublished sub-millimetre data from the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, in conjunction with new electronic MultiElement Radio Interferometric Network (e-MERLIN) L-band (1.5 GHz) observations. Thanks to the e-MERLIN resolution and sensitivity, we resolve for the first time a double structure composed of two radio sources separated by ~1 arcsec, previously observed only at higher frequency. We explore this data set, which further includes non-simultaneous data from the Very Large Array, the Gemini telescope, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray observatory, in terms of an outflow-dominated model. We compare our results with previous trends found for other AGN using the same model (NGC 4051, M81*, M87 and Sgr A*), as well as hard- and quiescent-state X-ray binaries. We find that the nuclear broad-band spectrum of M94 is consistent with a relativistic outflow of low inclination. The findings in this work add to the growing body of evidence that the physics of weakly accreting black holes scales with mass in a rather straightforward fashion.
  • The origin of the low luminosity radio emission in radio-quiet AGN, is unknown. The detection of a positive correlation between the radio and X-ray emission would imply a jet-like origin, similar to that seen in `hard state' X-ray binary systems. In our previous work, we found no believable radio variability in the well known X-ray bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051, despite large amplitude X-ray variability. In this study we have carefully re-analysed radio and X-ray observations using the same methods as our previous work, we again find no evidence for core radio variability. In direct contrast to our findings, another study claim significant radio variability and a distinctive anti-correlation between radio and X-ray data for the same source. The other study report only integral flux values and do not consider the effect of the changing array on the synthesised beam. In both our studies of NGC 4051 we have taken great care to account for the effect that the changing beam size has on the measured radio flux and as a result we are confident that our method gives more accurate values for the intrinsic core radio flux. However, the lack of radio variability we find is hard to reconcile because radio images of NGC 4051 do show jet-like structure. We suggest that the radio structures observed are likely the result of a previous period of higher radio activity and that the current level of radio emission from a compact nuclear jet is low.
  • The origin of short timescale (weeks/months) variability of AGN, whether due to intrinsic disc variations or reprocessing of X-ray emission by a surrounding accretion disc, has been a puzzle for many years. However recently a number of observational programmes, particularly of NGC5548 with Swift, have shown that the UV/optical variations lag behind the X-ray variations in a manner strongly supportive of X-ray reprocessing. Somewhat surprisingly the implied size of the accretion disc is ~3x greater than expected from a standard, smooth, Shakura-Sunyaev thin disc model. Although the difference may be explained by a clumpy accretion disc, it is not clear whether the difference will occur in all AGN or whether it may change as, eg, a function of black hole mass, accretion rate or disc temperature. Measurements of interband lags for most AGN require long timescale monitoring, which is hard to arrange. However for low mass (<1 million solar mass) AGN, the combination of XMM-Newton EPIC (X-rays) with the optical monitor in fast readout mode allows an X-ray/UV-optical lag to be measured within a single long observation. Here we summarise previous related observations and report on XMM-Newton observations of NGC4395 (mass ~100x lower and accretion rate ~20x lower than for NGC5548). We find that the UVW1 lags the X-rays by ~470s. Simultaneous observations at 6 different ground based observatories also allowed the g-band lag (~800s) to be measured. These observations are in agreement with X-ray reprocessing but initial analysis suggests that, for NGC4395, they do not differ markedly from the predictions of the standard thin disc model.
  • We analyze the light curves of 413 radio sources at submillimeter wavelengths using data from the Submillimeter Array calibrator database. The database includes more than 20,000 observations at 1.3 and 0.8 mm that span 13 years. We model the light curves as a damped random walk and determine a characteristic time scale $\tau$ at which the variability amplitude saturates. For the vast majority of sources, primarily blazars and BL Lac objects, we find only lower limits on $\tau$. For two nearby low luminosity active galactic nuclei, M81 and M87, however, we measure $\tau=1.6^{+3.0}_{-0.9}$ days and $\tau=45^{+61}_{-24}$ days, respectively ($2\sigma$ errors). Including the previously measured $\tau=0.33\pm 0.16$ days for Sgr A*, we show an approximately linear correlation between $\tau$ and black hole mass for these nearby LLAGN. Other LLAGN with spectra that peak in the submm are expected to follow this correlation. These characteristic time scales are comparable to the minimum time scale for emission processes close to an event horizon, and suggest that the underlying physics may be independent of black hole mass, accretion rate, and jet luminosity.
  • Dark Matter (DM) is an elusive form of matter which has been postulated to explain astronomical observations through its gravitational effects on stars and galaxies, gravitational lensing of light around these, and through its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This indirect evidence implies that DM accounts for as much as 84.5% of all matter in our Universe, yet it has so far evaded all attempts at direct detection, leaving such confirmation and the consequent discovery of its nature as one of the biggest challenges in modern physics. Here we present a novel form of low-mass DM $\chi$ that would have been missed by all experiments so far. While its large interaction strength might at first seem unlikely, neither constraints from particle physics nor cosmological/astronomical observations are sufficient to rule out this type of DM, and it motivates our proposal for direct detection by optomechanics technology which should soon be within reach, namely, through the precise position measurement of a levitated mesoscopic particle which will be perturbed by elastic collisions with $\chi$ particles. We show that a recently proposed nanoparticle matter-wave interferometer, originally conceived for tests of the quantum superposition principle, is sensitive to these collisions, too.
  • The Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) is a telescope specifically designed for high sensitivity measurements of low-surface-brightness features at cm-wavelength and has unique, important capabilities. It consists of two interferometer arrays operating over 13.5-18 GHz that image structures on scales of 0.5-10 arcmin with very low systematics. The Small Array (AMI-SA; ten 3.7-m antennas) couples very well to Sunyaev-Zel'dovich features from galaxy clusters and to many Galactic features. The Large Array (AMI-LA; eight 13-m antennas) has a collecting area ten times that of the AMI-SA and longer baselines, crucially allowing the removal of the effects of confusing radio point sources from regions of low surface-brightness, extended emission. Moreover AMI provides fast, deep object surveying and allows monitoring of large numbers of objects. In this White Paper we review the new science - both Galactic and extragalactic - already achieved with AMI and outline the prospects for much more.
  • We present intensive quasi-simultaneous X-ray and radio monitoring of the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051, over a 16 month period in 2000-2001. Observations were made with the Rossi Timing X-ray Explorer (RXTE) and the Very Large Array (VLA) at 8.4 and 4.8 GHz. In the X-ray band NGC 4051 behaves much like a Galactic black hole binary (GBH) system in a `soft-state'. In such systems, there has so far been no firm evidence for an active, radio-emitting jet like those found in `hard state' GBHs. VLBI observations of NGC 4051 show three co-linear compact components. This structure resembles the core and outer hot spots seen in powerful, jet-dominated, extragalactic radio sources and suggests the existence of a weak jet. Radio monitoring of the core of NGC 4051 is complicated by the presence of surrounding extended emission and by the changing array configurations of the VLA. Only in the A configuration is the core reasonably resolved. We have carefully removed the contaminations of the core by extended emission in the various arrays. The resulting lightcurve shows no sign of large amplitude variability (i.e. factor 50 %) over the 16 month period. Within the most sensitive configuration (A array) we see marginal evidence for radio core variability of ~25% (~0.12 mJy at 8.4GHz) on a 2-week timescale, correlated with X-ray variations. Even if the radio variations in NGC 4051 are real, the percentage variability is much less than in the X-ray band. Within the B configuration observations, where sensitivity is reduced, there is no sign of correlated X-ray/radio variability. The lack of radio variability in NGC 4051, which we commonly see in `hard state' GBHs, may be explained by orientation effects. Another possibility is that the radio emission arises from the X-ray corona, although the linear structure of the compact radio components here is hard to explain.
  • In this paper we discuss the recent advances in the quantitative comparison of accretion, and the accretion:jet coupling, in accreting black holes in both X-ray binaries (where M ~ 10Msun) and Active Galactic Nuclei (10^5Msun < M < 10^9Msun). These similarities include the radiative efficiency and jet power as a function of accretion rate, which are themselves probably the origin of the `fundamental plane of black hole activity'. A second `fundamental plane' which connects mass, accretion rate and timing properties provides us with a further physical diagnostic. Patterns of radio loudness (i.e. jet production) as a function of luminosity and accretion state are shown to be similar for X-ray binaries and AGN. Finally we discuss how neutron stars are a useful control sample, and what the future may hold for this field.
  • The X-ray emission from quasars such as 3C273 is generally agreed to arise from Compton scattering of low energy seed photons by relativistic electrons in a relativistic jet oriented close to the line of sight. However there are a number of possible models for the origin of the seed photons. In Paper I (McHardy et al 1999) we showed that the X-ray and IR variability from 3C273 was highly correlated in 1997, with the IR flux leading the X-rays by ~0.75 +/- 0.25 days. The strong correlation, and lag, supports the Synchrotron Self-Compton (SSC) model, where the seed photons are synchroton photons from the jet itself. The previous correlation was based on one moderately well sampled flare and another poorly sampled flare, so the possibility of chance correlated variability exists. Here we report on further X-ray and IR observations of 3C273 which confirm the behaviour seen in Paper I. During a 2 week period of observations we see a flare of amplitude ~25%, lasting for ~5 days, showing a high correlation between IR and X-ray variations, with the X-rays lagging by ~1.45+/- 0.15 days. These observations were not scheduled at any special time, implying that the same mechanism - almost certainly SSC - dominates the X-ray emission on most occasions and that the structure of the emission region is similar in most small flares.
  • From a combination of high quality X-ray observations from the NASA Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), and infrared observations from the UK Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) we show that the medium energy X-ray (3-20 keV) and near infrared fluxes in the quasar 3C273 are highly correlated. It is widely believed that the X-ray emission in quasars like 3C273 arises from Compton scattering of low energy seed photons and our observations provide the first reliable detection of correlated variations in 3C273 between the X-ray band and any lower energy band. For a realistic electron distribution we demonstrate that it is probable that each decade of the seed photon distribution from the mm to IR waveband contributes roughly equally to the medium energy X-ray flux. However the expected mm variations are too small to be detected above the noise, probably explaining the lack of success of previous searches for a correlation between X-ray and mm variations. In addition we show that the infrared leads the X-rays by 0.75+/-0.25 days. These observations rule out the `External Compton' emission process for the production of the X-rays.