• A number of recent applications of jet substructure, in particular searches for light new particles, require substructure observables that are decorrelated with the jet mass. In this paper we introduce the Convolved SubStructure (CSS) approach, which uses a theoretical understanding of the observable to decorrelate the complete shape of its distribution. This decorrelation is performed by convolution with a shape function whose parameters and mass dependence are derived analytically. We consider in detail the case of the $D_2$ observable and perform an illustrative case study using a search for a light hadronically decaying $Z'$. We find that the CSS approach completely decorrelates the $D_2$ observable over a wide range of masses. Our approach highlights the importance of improving the theoretical understanding of jet substructure observables to exploit increasingly subtle features for performance.
  • We derive and analytically solve renormalization group (RG) equations of gauge invariant non-local Wilson line operators which resum logarithms for event shape observables $\tau$ at subleading power in the $\tau\ll 1$ expansion. These equations involve a class of universal jet and soft functions arising through operator mixing, which we call $\theta$-jet and $\theta$-soft functions. An illustrative example involving these operators is introduced which captures the generic features of subleading power resummation, allowing us to derive the structure of the RG to all orders in $\alpha_s$, and provide field theory definitions of all ingredients. As a simple application, we use this to obtain an analytic leading logarithmic result for the subleading power resummed thrust spectrum for $H\to gg$ in pure glue QCD. This resummation determines the nature of the double logarithmic series at subleading power, which we find is still governed by the cusp anomalous dimension. We check our result by performing an analytic calculation up to ${\cal O}(\alpha_s^3)$. Consistency of the subleading power RG relates subleading power anomalous dimensions, constrains the form of the $\theta$-soft and $\theta$-jet functions, and implies an exponentiation of higher order loop corrections in the subleading power collinear limit. Our results provide a path for carrying out systematic resummation at subleading power for collider observables.
  • We derive an operator based factorization theorem for the energy-energy correlation (EEC) observable in the back-to-back region, allowing the cross section to be written as a convolution of hard, jet and soft functions. We prove the equivalence of the soft functions for the EEC and color singlet transverse-momentum resummation to all-loop order, and give their analytic result to three-loops. Large logarithms appearing in the perturbative expansion of the EEC can be resummed to all orders using renormalization group evolution. We give analytic results for all required anomalous dimensions to three-loop order, providing the first example of a transverse-momentum (recoil) sensitive $e^+e^-$ event shape whose anomalous dimensions are known at this order. The EEC can now be computed to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading logarithm matched to next-to-next-to-leading order, making it a prime candidate for precision QCD studies and extractions of the strong coupling constant. We anticipate that our factorization theorem will also be crucial for understanding non-perturbative power corrections for the EEC, and their relationship to those appearing in other observables.
  • We construct an effective field theory (EFT) description of the hard photon spectrum for heavy WIMP annihilation. This facilitates precision predictions relevant for line searches, and allows the incorporation of non-trivial energy resolution effects. Our framework combines techniques from non-relativistic EFTs and soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), as well as its multi-scale extensions that have been recently introduced for studying jet substructure. We find a number of interesting features, including the simultaneous presence of SCET$_{\text{I}}$ and SCET$_{\text{II}}$ modes, as well as collinear-soft modes at the electroweak scale. We derive a factorization formula that enables both the resummation of the leading large Sudakov double logarithms that appear in the perturbative spectrum, and the inclusion of Sommerfeld enhancement effects. Consistency of this factorization is demonstrated to leading logarithmic order through explicit calculation. Our final result contains both the exclusive and the inclusive limits, thereby providing a unifying description of these two previously-considered approximations. We estimate the impact on experimental sensitivity, focusing for concreteness on an SU(2)$_{W}$ triplet fermion dark matter - the pure wino - where the strongest constraints are due to a search for gamma-ray lines from the Galactic Center. We find numerically significant corrections compared to previous results, thereby highlighting the importance of accounting for the photon spectrum when interpreting data from current and future indirect detection experiments.
  • $N$-jettiness subtractions provide a general approach for performing fully-differential next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) calculations. Since they are based on the physical resolution variable $N$-jettiness, $\mathcal{T}_N$, subleading power corrections in $\tau=\mathcal{T}_N/Q$, with $Q$ a hard interaction scale, can also be systematically computed. We study the structure of power corrections for $0$-jettiness, $\mathcal{T}_0$, for the $gg\to H$ process. Using the soft-collinear effective theory we analytically compute the leading power corrections $\alpha_s \tau \ln\tau$ and $\alpha_s^2 \tau \ln^3\tau$ (finding partial agreement with a previous result in the literature), and perform a detailed numerical study of the power corrections in the $gg$, $gq$, and $q\bar q$ channels. This includes a numerical extraction of the $\alpha_s\tau$ and $\alpha_s^2 \tau \ln^2\tau$ corrections, and a study of the dependence on the $\mathcal{T}_0$ definition. Including such power suppressed logarithms significantly reduces the size of missing power corrections, and hence improves the numerical efficiency of the subtraction method. Having a more detailed understanding of the power corrections for both $q\bar q$ and $gg$ initiated processes also provides insight into their universality, and hence their behavior in more complicated processes where they have not yet been analytically calculated.
  • Observables which distinguish boosted topologies from QCD jets are playing an increasingly important role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These observables are often used in conjunction with jet grooming algorithms, which reduce contamination from both theoretical and experimental sources. In this paper we derive factorization formulae for groomed multi-prong substructure observables, focusing in particular on the groomed $D_2$ observable, which is used to identify boosted hadronic decays of electroweak bosons at the LHC. Our factorization formulae allow systematically improvable calculations of the perturbative $D_2$ distribution and the resummation of logarithmically enhanced terms in all regions of phase space using renormalization group evolution. They include a novel factorization for the production of a soft subjet in the presence of a grooming algorithm, in which clustering effects enter directly into the hard matching. We use these factorization formulae to draw robust conclusions of experimental relevance regarding the universality of the $D_2$ distribution in both $e^+e^-$ and $pp$ collisions. In particular, we show that the only process dependence is carried by the relative quark vs. gluon jet fraction in the sample, no non-global logarithms from event-wide correlations are present in the distribution, hadronization corrections are controlled by the perturbative mass of the jet, and all global color correlations are completely removed by grooming, making groomed $D_2$ a theoretically clean QCD observable even in the LHC environment. We compute all ingredients to one-loop accuracy, and present numerical results at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy for $e^+e^-$ collisions, comparing with parton shower Monte Carlo simulations. Results for $pp$ collisions, as relevant for phenomenology at the LHC, are presented in a companion paper.
  • We derive, in the framework of soft-collinear effective field theory (SCET), a Lagrangian describing the $t$-channel exchange of Glauber quarks in the Regge limit. The Glauber quarks are not dynamical, but are incorporated through non-local fermionic potential operators. These operators are power suppressed in $|t|/s$ relative to those describing Glauber gluon exchange, but give the first non-vanishing contributions in the Regge limit to processes such as $q\bar q \to gg$ and $q\bar q \to \gamma \gamma$. They therefore represent an interesting subset of power corrections to study. The structure of the operators, which describe certain soft and collinear emissions to all orders through Wilson lines, is derived from the symmetries of the effective theory combined with constraints from power and mass dimension counting, as well as through explicit matching calculations. Lightcone singularities in the fermionic potentials are regulated using a rapidity regulator, whose corresponding renormalization group evolution gives rise to the Reggeization of the quark at the amplitude level and the BFKL equation at the cross section level. We verify this at one-loop, deriving the Regge trajectory of the quark in the $3$ color channel, as well as the leading logarithmic BFKL equation. Results in the $\bar 6$ and $15$ color channels are obtained by the simultaneous exchange of a Glauber quark and a Glauber gluon. SCET with quark and gluon Glauber operators therefore provides a framework to systematically study the structure of QCD amplitudes in the Regge limit, and derive constraints on higher order amplitudes.
  • Jet substructure has emerged to play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where it has provided numerous innovative new ways to search for new physics and to probe the Standard Model in extreme regions of phase space. In this article we provide a comprehensive review of state of the art theoretical and machine learning developments in jet substructure. This article is meant both as a pedagogical introduction, covering the key physical principles underlying the calculation of jet substructure observables, the development of new observables, and cutting edge machine learning techniques for jet substructure, as well as a comprehensive reference for experts. We hope that it will prove a useful introduction to the exciting and rapidly developing field of jet substructure at the LHC.
  • Jet substructure is playing a central role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) probing the Standard Model in extreme regions of phase space and providing innovative ways to search for new physics. Analytic calculations of experimentally successful observables are a primary catalyst driving developments in jet substructure, allowing for a deeper understanding of observables and for the exploitation of increasingly subtle features of jets. In this paper we present a field theoretic framework enabling systematically improvable calculations of groomed multi-prong substructure observables, which builds on recent developments in multi-scale effective theories. We use this framework to compute for the first time the full spectrum for groomed tagging observables at the LHC, carefully treating both perturbative and non-perturbative contributions in all regions. Our analysis enables a precision understanding which we hope will improve the reach and sophistication of jet substructure techniques at the LHC.
  • The Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) is a powerful framework for studying factorization of amplitudes and cross sections in QCD. While factorization at leading power has been well studied, much less is known at subleading powers in the $\lambda\ll 1$ expansion. In SCET subleading soft and collinear corrections to a hard scattering process are described by power suppressed operators, which must be fixed case by case, and by well established power suppressed Lagrangians, which correct the leading power dynamics of soft and collinear radiation. Here we present a complete basis of power suppressed operators for $gg \to H$, classifying all operators which contribute to the cross section at $\mathcal{O}(\lambda^2)$, and showing how helicity selection rules significantly simplify the construction of the operator basis. We perform matching calculations to determine the tree level Wilson coefficients of our operators. These results are useful for studies of power corrections in both resummed and fixed order perturbation theory, and for understanding the factorization properties of gauge theory amplitudes and cross sections at subleading power. As one example, our basis of operators can be used to analytically compute power corrections for $N$-jettiness subtractions for $gg$ induced color singlet production at the LHC.
  • The $N$-jettiness observable $\mathcal{T}_N$ provides a way of describing the leading singular behavior of the $N$-jet cross section in the $\tau =\mathcal{T}_N/Q \to 0$ limit, where $Q$ is a hard interaction scale. We consider subleading power corrections in the $\tau \ll 1$ expansion, and employ soft-collinear effective theory to obtain analytic results for the dominant $\alpha_s \tau \ln\tau$ and $\alpha_s^2 \tau\ln^3\tau$ subleading terms for thrust in $e^+e^-$ collisions and $0$-jettiness for $q\bar q$-initiated Drell-Yan-like processes at hadron colliders. These results can be used to significantly improve the numerical accuracy and stability of the $N$-jettiness subtraction technique for performing fixed-order calculations at NLO and NNLO. They reduce the size of missing power corrections in the subtractions by an order of magnitude. We also point out that the precise definition of $N$-jettiness has an important impact on the size of the power corrections and thus the numerical accuracy of the subtractions. The sometimes employed definition of $N$-jettiness in the hadronic center-of-mass frame suffers from power corrections that grow exponentially with rapidity, causing the power expansion to deteriorate away from central rapidity. This degradation does not occur for the original $N$-jettiness definition, which explicitly accounts for the boost of the Born process relative to the frame of the hadronic collision, and has a well-behaved power expansion throughout the entire phase space. Integrated over rapidity, using this $N$-jettiness definition in the subtractions yields another order of magnitude improvement compared to employing the hadronic-frame definition.
  • Factorization theorems underly our ability to make predictions for many processes involving the strong interaction. Although typically formulated at leading power, the study of factorization at subleading power is of interest both for improving the precision of calculations, as well as for understanding the all orders structure of QCD. We use the SCET helicity operator formalism to construct a complete power suppressed basis of hard scattering operators for $e^+e^-\to$ dijets, $e^- p\to e^-$ jet, and constrained Drell-Yan, including the first two subleading orders in the amplitude level power expansion. We analyze the form of the hard, jet, and soft function contributions to the power suppressed cross section for $e^+e^-\to$ dijet event shapes, and give results for the lowest order matching to the contributing operators. These results will be useful for studies of power corrections both in fixed order and resummed perturbation theory.
  • Jet substructure observables, designed to identify specific features within jets, play an essential role at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), both for searching for signals beyond the Standard Model and for testing QCD in extreme phase space regions. In this paper, we systematically study the structure of infrared and collinear safe substructure observables, defining a generalization of the energy correlation functions to probe $n$-particle correlations within a jet. These generalized correlators provide a flexible basis for constructing new substructure observables optimized for specific purposes. Focusing on three major targets of the jet substructure community---boosted top tagging, boosted $W/Z/H$ tagging, and quark/gluon discrimination---we use power-counting techniques to identify three new series of powerful discriminants: $M_i$, $N_i$, and $U_i$. The $M_i$ series is designed for use on groomed jets, providing a novel example of observables with improved discrimination power after the removal of soft radiation. The $N_i$ series behave parametrically like the $N$-subjettiness ratio observables, but are defined without respect to subjet axes, exhibiting improved behavior in the unresolved limit. Finally, the $U_i$ series improves quark/gluon discrimination by using higher-point correlators to simultaneously probe multiple emissions within a jet. Taken together, these observables broaden the scope for jet substructure studies at the LHC.
  • On-shell helicity methods provide powerful tools for determining scattering amplitudes, which have a one-to-one correspondence with leading power helicity operators in the Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) away from singular regions of phase space. We show that helicity based operators are also useful for enumerating power suppressed SCET operators, which encode subleading amplitude information about singular limits. In particular, we present a complete set of scalar helicity building blocks that are valid for constructing operators at any order in the SCET power expansion. We also describe an interesting angular momentum selection rule that restricts how these building blocks can be assembled.
  • If a new high-mass resonance is discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, model-independent techniques to identify the production mechanism will be crucial to understand its nature and effective couplings to Standard Model particles. We present a powerful and model-independent method to infer the initial state in the production of any high-mass color-singlet system by using a tight veto on accompanying hadronic jets to divide the data into two mutually exclusive event samples (jet bins). For a resonance of several hundred GeV, the jet binning cut needed to discriminate quark and gluon initial states is in the experimentally accessible range of several tens of GeV. It also yields comparable cross sections for both bins, making this method viable already with the small event samples available shortly after a discovery. Theoretically, the method is made feasible by utilizing an effective field theory setup to compute the jet cut dependence precisely and model independently and to systematically control all sources of theoretical uncertainties in the jet binning, as well as their correlations. We use a 750 GeV scalar resonance as an example to demonstrate the viability of our method.
  • Non-global logarithms (NGLs) are the leading manifestation of correlations between distinct phase space regions in QCD and gauge theories and have proven a challenge to understand using traditional resummation techniques. Recently, the dressed gluon expansion was introduced that enables an expansion of the NGL series in terms of a "dressed gluon" building block, defined by an all-orders factorization theorem. Here, we clarify the nature of the dressed gluon expansion, and prove that it has an infinite radius of convergence as a solution to the leading logarithmic and large-$N_c$ master equation for NGLs, the Banfi-Marchesini-Smye (BMS) equation. The dressed gluon expansion therefore provides an expansion of the NGL series that can be truncated at any order, with reliable uncertainty estimates. In contrast, manifest in the results of the fixed-order expansion of the BMS equation up to 12-loops is a breakdown of convergence at a finite value of $\alpha_s$log. We explain this finite radius of convergence using the dressed gluon expansion, showing how the dynamics of the buffer region, a region of phase space near the boundary of the jet that was identified in early studies of NGLs, leads to large contributions to the fixed order expansion. We also use the dressed gluon expansion to discuss the convergence of the next-to-leading NGL series, and the role of collinear logarithms that appear at this order. Finally, we show how an understanding of the analytic behavior obtained from the dressed gluon expansion allows us to improve the fixed order NGL series using conformal transformations to extend the domain of analyticity. This allows us to calculate the NGL distribution for all values of $\alpha_s$log from the coefficients of the fixed order expansion.
  • Distinguishing hadronically decaying boosted top quarks from massive QCD jets is an important challenge at the Large Hadron Collider. In this paper we use the power counting method to study jet substructure observables designed for top tagging, and gain insight into their performance. We introduce a powerful new family of discriminants formed from the energy correlation functions which outperform the widely used N-subjettiness. These observables take a highly non-trivial form, demonstrating the importance of a systematic approach to their construction.
  • Helicity amplitudes are the fundamental ingredients of many QCD calculations for multi-leg processes. We describe how these can seamlessly be combined with resummation in Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), by constructing a helicity operator basis for which the Wilson coefficients are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. This basis is crossing symmetric and has simple transformation properties under discrete symmetries.
  • Observables which discriminate boosted topologies from massive QCD jets are of great importance for the success of the jet substructure program at the Large Hadron Collider. Such observables, while both widely and successfully used, have been studied almost exclusively with Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we present the first all-orders factorization theorem for a two-prong discriminant based on a jet shape variable, $D_2$, valid for both signal and background jets. Our factorization theorem simultaneously describes the production of both collinear and soft subjets, and we introduce a novel zero-bin procedure to correctly describe the transition region between these limits. By proving an all orders factorization theorem, we enable a systematically improvable description, and allow for precision comparisons between data, Monte Carlo, and first principles QCD calculations for jet substructure observables. Using our factorization theorem, we present numerical results for the discrimination of a boosted $Z$ boson from massive QCD background jets. We compare our results with Monte Carlo predictions which allows for a detailed understanding of the extent to which these generators accurately describe the formation of two-prong QCD jets, and informs their usage in substructure analyses. Our calculation also provides considerable insight into the discrimination power and calculability of jet substructure observables in general.
  • In this thesis I study applications of effective field theories to understand aspects of QCD jets and their substructure at the Large Hadron Collider. In particular, I introduce an observable, $D_2$, which can be used for distinguishing boosted $W/Z/H$ bosons from the QCD background using information about the radiation pattern within the jet, and perform a precision calculation of this observable. To simplify calculations in the soft collinear effective theory, I also develop a helicity operator basis, which facilitates matching calculations to fixed order computations performed using spinor-helicity techniques, and demonstrate its utility by computing an observable relevant for studying the properties of the newly discovered Higgs boson.
  • Many state-of-the-art QCD calculations for multileg processes use helicity amplitudes as their fundamental ingredients. We construct a simple and easy-to-use helicity operator basis in soft-collinear effective theory (SCET), for which the hard Wilson coefficients from matching QCD onto SCET are directly given in terms of color-ordered helicity amplitudes. Using this basis allows one to seamlessly combine fixed-order helicity amplitudes at any order they are known with a resummation of higher-order logarithmic corrections. In particular, the virtual loop amplitudes can be employed in factorization theorems to make predictions for exclusive jet cross sections without the use of numerical subtraction schemes to handle real-virtual infrared cancellations. We also discuss matching onto SCET in renormalization schemes with helicities in $4$- and $d$-dimensions. To demonstrate that our helicity operator basis is easy to use, we provide an explicit construction of the operator basis, as well as results for the hard matching coefficients, for $pp\to H + 0,1,2$ jets, $pp\to W/Z/\gamma + 0,1,2$ jets, and $pp\to 2,3$ jets. These operator bases are completely crossing symmetric, so the results can easily be applied to processes with $e^+e^-$ and $e^-p$ collisions.
  • Jet substructure observables play a central role at the Large Hadron Collider for identifying the boosted hadronic decay products of electroweak scale resonances. The complete description of these observables requires understanding both the limit in which hard substructure is resolved, as well as the limit of a jet with a single hard core. In this paper we study in detail the perturbative structure of two prominent jet substructure observables, $N$-subjettiness and the energy correlation functions, as measured on background QCD jets. In particular, we focus on the distinction between the limits in which two-prong structure is resolved or unresolved. Depending on the choice of subjet axes, we demonstrate that at fixed order, $N$-subjettiness can manifest myriad behaviors in the unresolved region: smooth tails, end-point singularities, or singularities in the physical region. The energy correlation functions, by contrast, only have non-singular perturbative tails extending to the end point. We discuss the effect of hadronization on the various observables with Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate that the modeling of these effects with non-perturbative shape functions is highly dependent on the $N$-subjettiness axes definitions. Our study illustrates those regions of phase space that must be controlled for high-precision jet substructure calculations, and emphasizes how such calculations can be facilitated by designing substructure observables with simple singular structures.
  • Despite their importance for precision QCD calculations, correlations between in- and out-of-jet regions of phase space have never directly been observed. These so-called non-global effects are present generically whenever a collider physics measurement is not explicitly dependent on radiation throughout the entire phase space. In this paper, we introduce a novel procedure based on mutual information, which allows us to isolate these non-global correlations between measurements made in different regions of phase space. We study this procedure both analytically and in Monte Carlo simulations in the context of observables measured on hadronic final states produced in $e^+e^-$ collisions, though it is more widely applicable. The procedure exploits the sensitivity of soft radiation at large angles to non-global correlations, and we calculate these correlations through next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The bulk of these non-global correlations are found to be described in Monte Carlo simulation. They increase by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects, which we show can be incorporated in our calculation through the use of a model shape function. This procedure illuminates the source of non-global correlations and has connections more broadly to fundamental quantities in quantum field theory.
  • An outstanding problem in QCD and jet physics is the factorization and resummation of logarithms that arise due to phase space constraints, so-called non-global logarithms (NGLs). In this paper, we show that NGLs can be factorized and resummed down to an unresolved infrared scale by making sufficiently many measurements on a jet or other restricted phase space region. Resummation is accomplished by renormalization group evolution of the objects in the factorization theorem and anomalous dimensions can be calculated to any perturbative accuracy and with any number of colors. To connect with the NGLs of more inclusive measurements, we present a novel perturbative expansion which is controlled by the volume of the allowed phase space for unresolved emissions. Arbitrary accuracy can be obtained by making more and more measurements so to resolve lower and lower scales. We find that even a minimal number of measurements produces agreement with Monte Carlo methods for leading-logarithmic resummation of NGLs at the sub-percent level over the full dynamical range relevant for the Large Hadron Collider. We also discuss other applications of our factorization theorem to soft jet dynamics and how to extend to higher-order accuracy.
  • Optimized jet substructure observables for identifying boosted topologies will play an essential role in maximizing the physics reach of the Large Hadron Collider. Ideally, the design of discriminating variables would be informed by analytic calculations in perturbative QCD. Unfortunately, explicit calculations are often not feasible due to the complexity of the observables used for discrimination, and so many validation studies rely heavily, and solely, on Monte Carlo. In this paper we show how methods based on the parametric power counting of the dynamics of QCD, familiar from effective theory analyses, can be used to design, understand, and make robust predictions for the behavior of jet substructure variables. As a concrete example, we apply power counting for discriminating boosted Z bosons from massive QCD jets using observables formed from the n-point energy correlation functions. We show that power counting alone gives a definite prediction for the observable that optimally separates the background-rich from the signal-rich regions of phase space. Power counting can also be used to understand effects of phase space cuts and the effect of contamination from pile-up, which we discuss. As these arguments rely only on the parametric scaling of QCD, the predictions from power counting must be reproduced by any Monte Carlo, which we verify using Pythia8 and Herwig++. We also use the example of quark versus gluon discrimination to demonstrate the limits of the power counting technique.