• The aim of this study is to accurately calculate the rotational period of CS\,Vir by using {\sl STEREO} observations and investigate a possible period variation of the star with the help of all accessible data. The {\sl STEREO} data that cover five-year time interval between 2007 and 2011 are analyzed by means of the Lomb-Scargle and Phase Dispersion Minimization methods. In order to obtain a reliable rotation period and its error value, computational algorithms such as the Levenberg-Marquardt and Monte-Carlo simulation algorithms are applied to the data sets. Thus, the rotation period of CS\,Vir is improved to be 9.29572(12) days by using the five-year of combined data set. Also, the light elements are calculated as $HJD_\mathrm{max} = 2\,454\,715.975(11) + 9_{\cdot}^\mathrm{d}29572(12) \times E + 9_{\cdot}^\mathrm{d}78(1.13) \times 10^{-8} \times E^2$ by means of the extremum times derived from the {\sl STEREO} light curves and archives. Moreover, with this study, a period variation is revealed for the first time, and it is found that the period has lengthened by 0.66(8) s y$^{-1}$, equivalent to 66 seconds per century. Additionally, a time-scale for a possible spin-down is calculated around $\tau_\mathrm{SD} \sim 10^6$ yr. The differential rotation and magnetic braking are thought to be responsible of the mentioned rotational deceleration. It is deduced that the spin-down time-scale of the star is nearly three orders of magnitude shorter than its main-sequence lifetime ($\tau_\mathrm{MS} \sim 10^9$ yr). It is, in return, suggested that the process of increase in the period might be reversible.
  • In this paper, the period evolution of the rotating chemically peculiar star V473\,Tau (A0Si, V = 7.26 mag) is investigated. Even though the star has been observed for more than fifty years, for the first time four consecutive years of space-based data covering between 2007 and 2010 is presented. The data is from the {\sl STEREO} satellite, and is combined with the archival results. The analysis shows that the rotation period of V473\,Tau is $1.406829(10)$ days, and has slightly decreased with the variation rate of -0.11(3)~s~yr$^{-1}$ over time. Also, the acceleration timescale of the star is found to be around $-1.11(63) \times 10^6$~yr, shorter than its main sequence lifetime ($9.26(1.25) \times 10^8$~yr). This indicates that the process of decrease in period might be reversible. On this basis, it can be suggested that V473\,Tau has a possible magnetic breaking and a differential rotation, which cause a variation in the movement of inertia, and hence the observed period change.
  • 13\,Tau is a rarely studied bright B9V type star ({\sl V} = 5.68 mag), which shows a weak and double-peaked H{$\alpha$} emission profile in its spectra. In this study, we presented high-precision photometric data of 13\,Tau taken by the {\sl STEREO} satellite between 2007 and 2011, and compared the results to the spectroscopic findings to shed light on the Be phenomenon in the star. From the frequency analysis of the five-year data, we detected that 13\,Tau has exhibited a mono-periodic light variation ($f$ = 1.80487(1) cd$^{-1}$; A $\sim$ 2.76(8) mmag). The analysis revealed that frequency and amplitude values of the seasonal light curves varied from one year to another. From the spectroscopic data, we figured out that the equivalent widths of the H{$\alpha$} lines also showed variability, which seemed connected to the changes seen in both frequency and amplitude.
  • HD 90386 is a rarely studied bright A2V type Delta Scuti star (V = 6.66 mag). It displays short-term light curve variations which are originated due to either a beating phenomenon or a non-periodic variation. In this paper, we presented high-precision photometric data of HD 90386 taken by the STEREO satellite between 2007 and 2011 to shed light on its internal structure and evolution stage. From the frequency analysis of the four-year data, we detected that HD 90386 had at least six different frequencies between 1 and 15 c~d$^{-1}$. The most dominant frequencies were found at around 10.25258 c~d$^{-1}$ (A $\sim$ 1.92 mmag) and 12.40076 c~d$^{-1}$ (A $\sim$ 0.61 mmag). Based on the ratio between these frequencies, the star was considered as an overtone pulsator. The variation in pulsation period over 35 years was calculated to be dP/Pdt = 5.39(2) x 10$^{-3}$ yr$^{-1}$. Other variabilities at around 1.0 c~d$^{-1}$ in the amplitude spectrum of HD90386 were also discussed. In order to explain these variabilities, possible rotational effects and Gamma Dor type variations were focused. Consequently, depending on the rotation velocity of HD 90386, we speculated that these changes might be related to Gamma Dor type high-order g-modes shifted to the higher frequencies and that HD 90386 might be a hybrid star.
  • We assess the multi-wavelength observable properties of the bow shock around a runaway early type star using a combination of hydrodynamical modelling, radiative transfer calculations and synthetic imaging. Instabilities associated with the forward shock produce dense knots of material which are warm, ionised and contain dust. These knots of material are responsible for the majority of emission at far infra-red, H alpha and radio wavelengths. The large scale bow shock morphology is very similar and differences are primarily due to variations in the assumed spatial resolution. However infra-red intensity slices (at 22 microns and 12 microns) show that the effects of a temperature gradient can be resolved at a realistic spatial resolution for an object at a distance of 1 kpc.
  • We report a time-series analysis of the O4 I(n)fp star zeta Pup, based on optical photometry obtained with the SMEI instrument on the Coriolis satellite, 2003--2006. A single astrophysical signal is found, with P = (1.780938 \pm 0.000093) d and a mean semi-amplitude of (6.9 \pm 0.3) mmag. There is no evidence for persistent coherent signals with semi-amplitudes in excess of ca. 2~mmag on any of the timescales previously reported in the literature. In particular, there is no evidence for a signature of the proposed rotation period, ca. 5.1~days; zeta Pup is therefore probably not an oblique magnetic rotator. The 1.8-day signal varies in amplitude by a factor ca. 2 on timescales of 10--100d (and probably by more on longer timescales), and exhibits modest excursions in phase, but there is no evidence for systematic changes in period over the 1000-d span of our observations. Rotational modulation and stellar-wind variability appear to be unlikely candidates for the underlying mechanism; we suggest that the physical origin of the signal may be pulsation associated with low-l oscillatory convection modes.
  • Runaway, massive stars are not among the most numerous. However, the bow shocks built by their supersonic movement in the interstellar medium have been detected in the infrared range in many cases. Most recently, the stellar bow shocks have been proposed as particle acceleration sites, as radio data analysis at high angular resolution have shown. We present results of different manifestations of the stellar bowshock phenomenon, revealed from modern IR databases.
  • We present radio observations of the magnetic chemically peculiar Bp star HR Lup (HD 133880) at 647 and 277 MHz with the GMRT. At both frequencies the source is not detected but we are able to determine upper limits to the emission. The 647 MHz limits are particularly useful, with a 5\sigma\ value of 0.45 mJy. Also, no large enhancements of the emission were seen. The non-detections, along with previously published higher frequency detections, provide evidence that an optically thick gyrosynchrotron model is the correct mechanism for the radio emission of HR Lup.
  • In this paper we present follow-up optical observations of Ultra Steep Spectrum sources that were found by matching 150 MHz GMRT sources with either the 74 MHz VLSS or the 1400 MHz NVSS. These sources are possibly high-redshift radio galaxies but optical identification is required for clarification. The follow-up observations were conducted with the Liverpool Telescope; in all cases no sources are detected down to an R magnitude of ~23. By applying models and using the K-z relation we are able to suggest that these sources are possibly at high redshift. We discuss how 2m class telescopes can help with the identification of HzRGs from large-scale, low-frequency surveys.
  • Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819 -- one of four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation and the frequency of maximum oscillation power. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster-membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about two orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.
  • Before the age of modern photographic and CCD observations alpha Cassiopeiae was labelled as a variable star, though this variability has not been seen with modern instrumentation. We present an analysis of 3 years of high precision space-based photometric measurements of the suspected variable star alpha Cassiopeiae, obtained by the broad band Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) instrument on board the Coriolis satellite. Over the 3 years of observations the star appears to not show any significant variability. Also, data from the Hipparcos epoch photometry annex shows no significant variability.
  • We present results of a 150 MHz survey of a field centered on Epsilon Eridani, undertaken with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The survey covers an area with a diameter of 2 deg, has a spatial resolution of 30" and a noise level of 3.1 mJy at the pointing centre. These observations provide a deeper and higher resolution view of the 150 MHz radio sky than the 7C survey (although the 7C survey covers a much larger area). A total of 113 sources were detected, most are point-like, but 20 are extended. We present an analysis of these sources, in conjunction with the NVSS (at 1.4 GHz) and VLSS (at 74 MHz). This process allowed us to identify 5 Ultra Steep Spectrum (USS) radio sources that are candidate high redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). In addition, we have derived the dN/dS distribution for these observations and compare our results with other low frequency radio surveys.
  • We present results from new low frequency observations of two extrasolar planetary systems (Epsilon Eridani and HD128311) taken at 150 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We do not detect either system, but are able to place tight upper limits on their low frequency radio emission.
  • We present a new analysis of the expected magnetospheric radio emission from extrasolar giant planets for a distance limited sample of the nearest known extrasolar planets. Using recent results on the correlation between stellar X-ray flux and mass-loss rates from nearby stars, we estimate the expected mass-loss rates of the host stars of extrasolar planets that lie within 20pc of the Earth. We find that some of the host stars have mass-loss rates that are more than 100 times that of the Sun, and given the expected dependence of the planetary magnetospheric radio flux on stellar wind properties this has a very substantial effect. Using these results and extrapolations of the likely magnetic properties of the extrasolar planets we infer their likely radio properties. We compile a list of the most promising radio targets, and conclude that the planets orbiting Tau Bootes, Gliese 86, Upsilon Andromeda and HD1237 (as well as HD179949) are the most promising candidates, with expected flux levels that should be detectable in the near future with upcoming telescope arrays. The expected emission peak from these candidate radio emitting planets is typically \~40-50 MHz. We also discuss a range of observational considerations for detecting extrasolar giant planets.
  • We present Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray data of NGC5253, a local starbursting dwarf elliptical galaxy, in the early stages of a starburst episode. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission, in the form of what appear to be multiple superbubbles, and smaller bubbles probably associated with individual star clusters. Chandra detects 17 sources within the optical extent of NGC5253 down to a completeness level corresponding to a luminosity of 1.5E37 erg/s.The slope of the point source X-ray luminosity function is -0.54, similar to that of other nearby dwarf starburst galaxies. Several different types of source are detected within the galaxy, including X-ray binaries and the emission associated with star-clusters. Comparison of the diffuse X-ray emission with the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in their extent. The best spectral fit to the diffuse emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas components of ~0.24keV and ~0.75keV.The derived parameters of the diffuse X-ray emitting gas are as follows: a total mass of \~1.4E6 f^{1/2} Msun, where f is the volume filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas, and a total thermal energy content for the hot X-ray emitting gas of \~3.4E54 f^{1/2} erg. The pressure in the diffuse gas is P/k ~ 1E6f^{-1/2}K/cm3. We find that these values are broadly commensurate with the mass and energy injection from the starburst population. Analysis of the kinematics of the starburst region suggest that the stellar ejecta contained within it can escape the gravitational potential well of the galaxy, and pollute the surrounding IGM.
  • We present results from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of NGC 4214, a nearby dwarf starburst galaxy containing several young regions of very active star-formation. Starburst regions are known to be associated with diffuse X-ray emission, and in this case the X-ray emission from the galaxy shows an interesting morphological structure within the galaxy, clearly associated with the central regions of active star-formation. Of the two main regions of star-formation in this galaxy, X-ray emission associated with the older is identified whereas little is detected from the younger, providing an insight into the evolutionary process of the formation of superbubbles around young stellar clusters. The spectra of the diffuse emission from the galaxy can be fitted with a two temperature component thermal model with kT=0.14keV and 0.52keV, and analysis of this emission suggests that NGC 4214 will suffer a blow-out in the future. The point source population of the galaxy has an X-ray luminosity function with a slope of -0.76. This result, together with those for other dwarf starburst galaxies (NGC 4449 and NGC 5253), was added to a sample of luminosity functions for spiral and starburst galaxies. The slope of the luminosity function of dwarf starbursts is seen to be similar to that of their larger counterparts and clearly flatter than those seen in spirals. Further comparisons between the luminosity functions of starbursts and spiral galaxies are also made.
  • We present CHANDRA X-ray data of the nearby Magellanic Irregular dwarf starburst galaxy NGC4449. Contributions to the X-ray emission come from discrete point sources and extended diffuse emission. The extended emission has a complex morphology with an extent of 2.4x1.6kpc down to a flux density of 1.3E-13 erg/s/cm2/arcmin2. The best spectral fit to this emission is obtained with an absorbed, two temperature model giving temperatures for the two gas components of 0.28keV and 0.86keV, a total mass content of ~10^7 Msun compared with a galactic mass of several 10^{10} Msun and a total thermal energy content of ~2.5E55erg, with an average energy injection rate for the galaxy of a few 1E41 erg/s. Comparison of the morphology of the diffuse X-ray emission with that of the observed Halpha emission shows similarities in the two emissions. An expanding super-bubble is suggested by the presence of diffuse X-ray emission within what appears to be a cavity in the Halpha emission. The kinematics of this bubble suggest an expansion velocity of ~220km/s and a mass injection rate of 0.14Msun/yr, but the presence of NGC4449's huge HI halo (r~40kpc) may prevent the ejection, into the IGM, of the metal-enriched material and energy it contains. The arcsecond-resolution of CHANDRA has detected 24 X-ray point sources down to a completeness level corresponding to a flux of ~2E-14 erg/s/cm2, within the optical extent of NGC4449 and analysis of their spectra has shown them to be from at least 3 different classes of object. As well as the known SNR in this galaxy, it also harbours several X-ray binaries and super-soft sources. The point source X-ray luminosity function, for the higher luminosity sources, has a slope of ~-0.51, comparable to those of other starburst galaxies.
  • We present results from a series of hydrodynamic simulations investigating ram pressure stripping of galactic haloes as the host galaxy falls radially into a cluster. We perform a parameter study comprising of variations in initial gas content, gas injection rate (via stellar mass loss processes), galaxy mass and amplitude of infall. From the simulation results we track variations in both physical quantities (e.g. gas mass) and directly observable quantities (e.g. X-ray luminosities). The luminosity of the galaxy's X-ray halo is found to compare favourably with the observationally determined correlation with optical blue band luminosity (L_X:L_B) relation. Factors affecting the X-ray luminosity are explored and it is found that the gas injection rate is a dominant factor in determining the integrated luminosity. Observational properties of the material stripped from the galaxy, which forms an X-ray wake, are investigated and it is found that wakes are most visible around galaxies with a substantial initial gas content, during their first passage though the cluster. We define a statistical skewness measure which may be used to determine the direction of motion of a galaxy using X-ray observations. Structures formed in these simulations are similar to the cold fronts seen in observation of cluster mergers where a sharp increase in surface brightness is accompanied by a transition to a cooler region.
  • Results of a study of the theoretically predicted and observed X-ray properties of local massive star clusters are presented, with a focus on understanding the mass and energy flow from these clusters into the ISM via a cluster wind. A simple theoretical model, based on the work of Chevalier & Clegg (1985), is used to predict the theoretical cluster properties, and these are compared to those obtained from recent Chandra observations. The model includes the effect of lower energy transfer efficiency and mass-loading. In spite of limited statistics, some general trends are indicated; the observed temperature of the diffuse X-ray emission is lower than that predicted from the stellar mass and energy input rates, but the predicted scaling of X-ray luminosity with cluster parameters is seen. The implications of these results are discussed.
  • We present results from XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer observations of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. These high resolution spectra represent the best X-ray spectra to date of a starburst galaxy. A complex array of lines from species over a wide range of temperatures is seen, the most prominent being due to Lyman-alpha emission from abundant low Z elements such as N, O, Ne, Mg and Si. Emission lines from Helium-like charge states of the same elements are also seen in emission, as are strong lines from the entire Fe-L series. Further, the OVII line complex is resolved and is seen to be consistent with gas in collisional ionization equilibrium. Spectral fitting indicates emission from a large mass of gas with a differential emission measure over a range of temperatures (from 0.2 keV to 1.6 keV, peaking at 0.7 keV), and evidence for super-solar abundances of several elements is indicated. Spatial analysis of the data indicates that low energy emission is more extended to the south and east of the nucleus than to the north and west. Higher energy emission is far more centrally concentrated.
  • We present new radio continuum observations of two dwarf starburst galaxies, NGC3125 and NGC5408, with observations at 4.80GHz (6cm) and 8.64GHz (3cm), taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Both galaxies show a complex radio morphology with several emission regions, mostly coincident with massive young star clusters. The radio spectral indices of these regions are negative (with alpha ~ -0.5 - -0.7), indicating that the radio emission is dominated by synchrotron emission associated with supernova activity from the starburst. One emission region in NGC5408 has a flatter index (alpha ~ -0.1) indicative of optically thin free-free emission, which could indicate it is a younger cluster. Consequently, in these galaxies we do not see regions with the characteristic positive spectral index indicative of optically obscured star-formation regions, as seen in other dwarf starbursts such as Hen 2-10.
  • The dynamical signatures of the interaction between galaxies in clusters and the intracluster medium (ICM) can potentially yield significant information about the structure and dynamical history of clusters. To develop our understanding of this phenomenon we present results from numerical modelling of the galaxy/ICM interaction, as the galaxy moves through the cluster. The simulations have been performed for a broad range, of ICM temperatures (kT = 1,4 and 8 keV), representative of poor clusters or groups through to rich clusters. There are several dynamical features that can be identified in these simulations; for supersonic galaxy motion, a leading bow-shock is present, and also a weak gravitationally focussed wake or tail behind the galaxy (analogous to Bondi-Hoyle accretion). For galaxies with higher mass-replenishment rates and a denser interstellar medium (ISM), the dominant feature is a dense ram-pressure stripped tail. In line with other simulations, we find that the ICM/galaxy ISM interaction can result in complex time- dependent dynamics, with ram-pressure stripping occurring in an episodic manner. In order to facilitate this comparison between the observational consequences of dynamical studies and X-ray observations we have calculated synthetic X-ray flux and hardness maps from these simulations. These calculations predict that the ram-pressure stripped tail will usually be the most visible feature, though in nearby galaxies the bow-shock preceding the galaxy should also be apparent in deeper X-ray observations. We briefly discuss these results and compare with X-ray observations of galaxies where there is evidence of such interactions.
  • We investigate the X-ray emission from the central regions of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. Previous observations had shown a bright central X-ray point source, with suggestions as to its nature including a low-luminosity AGN or an X-ray binary. A new analysis of ROSAT HRI observations find 4 X-ray point sources in the central kpc of M82 and we identify radio counterparts for the two brightest X-ray sources. The counterparts are probably young radio supernovae (SN) and are amongst the most luminous and youthful SN in M82. Therefore, we suggest that we are seeing X-ray emission from young supernovae in M82, and in particular the brightest X-ray source is associated with the radio source 41.95+57.5. We discuss the implications of these observations for the evolution of X-ray luminous SN.
  • We present a multiwavelength analysis of the prominent active galaxy NGC1365, in particular looking at the radio and X-ray properties of the central regions of the galaxy. We analyse ROSAT observations of NGC1365, and discuss recent ASCA results. In addition to a number of point sources in the vicinity of NGC1365, we find a region of X-ray emission extending along the central bar of the galaxy, combined with an emission peak near the centre of the galaxy. This X-ray emission is centred on the optical/radio nucleus, but is spatially extended. The X-ray spectrum can be well fitted by a thermal plasma model, with kT=0.6-0.8keV and a low local absorbing column. The thermal spectrum is suggestive of starburst emission rather than emission from a central black-hole. The ATCA radio observations show a number of hotspots, located in a ring around a weak radio nucleus. Synchrotron emission from electrons accelerated by supernovae and supernova remnants (SNRs) is the likely origin of these hotspots. The radio nucleus has a steep spectrum, indicative perhaps of an AGN or SNRs. The evidence for a jet emanating from the nucleus is at best marginal. The extent of the radio ring is comparable to the extended central X-ray source.
  • Wind-blown bubbles, from those around massive O and Wolf-Rayet stars, to superbubbles around OB associations and galactic winds in starburst galaxies, have a dominant role in determining the structure of the Interstellar Medium. X-ray observations of these bubbles are particularly important as most of their volume is taken up with hot gas, 1E5 < T (K) < 1E8. However, it is difficult to compare X-ray observations, usually analysed in terms of single or two temperature spectral model fits, with theoretical models, as real bubbles do not have such simple temperature distributions. In this introduction to a series of papers detailing the observable X-ray properties of wind-blown bubbles, we describe our method with which we aim to solve this problem, analysing a simulation of a wind-blown bubble around a massive star. We model a wind of constant mass and energy injection rate, blowing into a uniform ISM, from which we calculate X-ray spectra as would be seen by the ROSAT PSPC. We compare the properties of the bubble as would be inferred from the ROSAT data with the true properties of the bubble in the simulation. We find standard spectral models yield inferred properties that deviate significantly from the true properties, even though the spectral fits are statistically acceptable, and give no indication that they do not represent to true spectral distribution. Our results suggest that in any case where the true source spectrum does not come from a simple single or two temperature distribution the "observed" X-ray properties cannot naively be used to infer the true properties.