• We characterize a transition from normal to ballistic diffusion in a bouncing ball dynamics. The system is composed of a particle, or an ensemble of non-interacting particles, experiencing elastic collisions with a heavy and periodically moving wall under the influence of a constant gravitational field. The dynamics lead to a mixed phase space where chaotic orbits have a free path to move along the velocity axis, presenting a normal diffusion behavior. Depending on the control parameter, one can observe the presence of featured resonances, known as accelerator modes, that lead to a ballistic growth of velocity. Through statistical and numerical analysis of the velocity of the particle, we are able to characterize a transition between the two regimes, where transport properties were used to characterize the scenario of the ballistic regime. Also, in an analysis of the probability of an orbit to reach an accelerator mode as a function of the velocity, we observe a competition between the normal and ballistic transport in the mid range velocity.
  • The changeover from normal to super diffusion in time dependent billiards is explained analytically. The unlimited energy growth for an ensemble of bouncing particles in time dependent billiards is obtained by means of a two dimensional mapping of the first and second moments of the velocity distribution function. We prove that for low initial velocities the mean velocity of the ensemble grows with exponent ~1/2 of the number of collisions with the border, therefore exhibiting normal diffusion. Eventually, this regime changes to a faster growth characterized by an exponent ~1 corresponding to super diffusion. For larger initial velocities, the temporary symmetry in the diffusion of velocities explains an initial plateau of the average velocity.
  • Brain plasticity, also known as neuroplasticity, is a fundamental mechanism of neuronal adaptation in response to changes in the environment or due to brain injury. In this review, we show our results about the effects of synaptic plasticity on neuronal networks composed by Hodgkin-Huxley neurons. We show that the final topology of the evolved network depends crucially on the ratio between the strengths of the inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Excitation of the same order of inhibition revels an evolved network that presents the rich-club phenomenon, well known to exist in the brain. For initial networks with considerably larger inhibitory strengths, we observe the emergence of a complex evolved topology, where neurons sparsely connected to other neurons, also a typical topology of the brain. The presence of noise enhances the strength of both types of synapses, but if the initial network has synapses of both natures with similar strengths. Finally, we show how the synchronous behaviour of the evolved network will reflect its evolved topology.
  • We study the capacity of Hodgkin-Huxley neuron in a network to change temporarily or permanently their connections and behavior, the so called spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), as a function of their synchronous behavior. We consider STDP of excitatory and inhibitory synapses driven by Hebbian rules. We show that the final state of networks evolved by a STDP depend on the initial network configuration. Specifically, an initial all-to-all topology envolves to a complex topology. Moreover, external perturbations can induce co-existence of clusters, those whose neurons are synchronous and those whose neurons are desynchronous. This work reveals that STDP based on Hebbian rules leads to a change in the direction of the synapses between high and low frequency neurons, and therefore, Hebbian learning can be explained in terms of preferential attachment between these two diverse communities of neurons, those with low-frequency spiking neurons, and those with higher-frequency spiking neurons.
  • A perturbative method called beatification is presented for a class of two-dimensional fluid and plasma theories. The Hamiltonian systems considered, namely the Euler, Vlasov-Poisson, Hasegawa-Mima, and modified Hasegawa-Mima equations, are naturally described in terms of noncanonical variables. The beatification procedure amounts to finding the correct transformation that removes the explicit variable dependence from a noncanonical Poisson bracket and replaces it with a fixed dependence on a chosen state in phase space. As such, beatification is a major step toward casting the Hamiltonian system in its canonical form, thus enabling or facilitating the use of analytical and numerical techniques that require or favor a representation in terms of canonical, or beatified, Hamiltonian variables.
  • Nonlinear dynamical systems may be exposed to tipping points, critical thresholds at which small changes in the external inputs or in the systems parameters abruptly shift the system to an alternative state with a contrasting dynamical behavior. While tipping in a fold bifurcation of an equilibrium is well understood, much less is known about tipping of oscillations (limit cycles) though this dynamics are the typical response of many natural systems to a periodic external forcing, like e.g. seasonal forcing in ecology and climate sciences. We provide a detailed analysis of tipping phenomena in periodically forced systems and show that, when limit cycles are considered, a transient structure, so-called channel, plays a fundamental role in the transition. Specifically, we demonstrate that trajectories crossing such channel conserve, for a characteristic time, the twisting behavior of the stable limit cycle destroyed in the fold bifurcation of cycles. As a consequence, this channel acts like a ghost of the limit cycle destroyed in the critical transition and instead of the expected abrupt transition we find a smooth one. This smoothness is also the reason that it is difficult to precisely determine the transition point employing the usual indicators of tipping points, like critical slowing down and flickering.
  • We have studied effects of perturbations on the cat cerebral cortex. According to the literature, this cortex structure can be described by a clustered network. This way, we construct a clustered network with the same number of areas as in the cat matrix, where each area is described as a sub-network with small-world property. We focus on the suppression of neuronal phase synchronisation considering different kinds of perturbations. Among the various controlling interventions, we choose three methods: delayed feedback control, external time-periodic driving, and activation of selected neurons. We simulate these interventions to provide a procedure to suppress undesired and pathological abnormal rhythms that can be associated with many forms of synchronisation. In our simulations, we have verified that the efficiency of synchronisation suppression by delayed feedback control is higher than external time-periodic driving and activation of selected neurons for the cat cerebral cortex with the same coupling strengths.
  • A method for extracting finite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems from a class of 2+1 Hamiltonian mean field theories is presented. These theories possess noncanonical Poisson brackets, which normally resist Hamiltonian truncation, but a process of beatification by coordinate transformation near a reference state is described in order to perturbatively overcome this difficulty. Two examples of four-wave truncation of Euler's equation for scalar vortex dynamics are given and compared: one a direct non-Hamiltonian truncation of the equations of motion, the other obtained by beatifying the Poisson bracket and then truncating.
  • A competition between decay and growth of energy in a time-dependent stadium billiard is discussed giving emphasis in the decay of energy mechanism. A critical resonance velocity is identified for causing of separation between ensembles of high and low energy and a statistical investigation is made using ensembles of initial conditions both above and below the resonance velocity. For high initial velocity, Fermi acceleration is inherent in the system. However for low initial velocity, the resonance allies with stickiness hold the particles in a regular or quasi-regular regime near the fixed points, preventing them from exhibiting Fermi acceleration. Also, a transport analysis along the velocity axis is discussed to quantify the competition of growth and decay of energy and making use distributions of histograms of frequency, and we set that the causes of the decay of energy are due to the capture of the orbits by the resonant fixed points.
  • In this paper, we investigated the neural spikes synchronisation in a neural network with synaptic plasticity and external perturbation. In the simulations the neural dynamics is described by the Hodgkin Huxley model considering chemical synapses (excitatory) among neurons. According to neural spikes synchronisation is expected that a perturbation produce non synchronised regimes. However, in the literature there are works showing that the combination of synaptic plasticity and external perturbation may generate synchronised regime. This article describes the effect of the synaptic plasticity on the synchronisation, where we consider a perturbation with a uniform distribution. This study is relevant to researches of neural disorders control.
  • This paper analyses the Hamiltonian model of drift waves which describes the chaotic transport of particles in the plasma confinement. With one drift wave the system is integrable and it presents stable orbits. When one wave is added the system may or may not be integrable depending on the phase of each wave velocity. If the two waves have the same phase velocity, the system is integrable. When the phase velocities between the two waves are different, the system shows chaotic behaviour. In this model we add a small dissipation. In the presence of a weak dissipation, for different initial conditions, we observe transient orbits which converge to periodic attractors.
  • The dynamics of a bouncing ball model under the influence of dissipation is investigated by using a two dimensional nonlinear mapping. When high dissipation is considered, the dynamics evolves to different attractors. The evolution of the basins of the attracting fixed points is characterized, as we vary the control parameters. Crises between the attractors and their boundaries are observed. We found that the multiple attractors are intertwined, and when the boundary crisis between their stable and unstable manifolds occur, it creates a successive mechanism of destruction for all attractors originated by the sinks. Also, an impact physical crises is setup, and it may be useful as a mechanism to reduce the number of attractors in the system.
  • The equilibrium magnetic field inside axisymmetric plasmas with inversions on the toroidal current density is studied. Structurally stable non-nested magnetic surfaces are considered. For any inversion in the internal current density the magnetic families define several positive current channels about a central negative one. A general expression relating the positive and negative currents is derived in terms of a topological anisotropy parameter. Next, an analytical local solution for the poloidal magnetic flux is derived and shown compatible with current hollow magnetic pitch measurements shown in the literature. Finally, the analytical solution exhibits non-nested magnetic families with positive anisotropy, indicating that the current inside the positive channels have at least twice the magnitude of the central one.
  • We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak (K. W. Gentle and Huang He, Plasma Sci. and Technology, 10, 284 (2008)), a toroidal plasma device with one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. For negative biased plasma discharges, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias the plasma has a reversed shear flow and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.
  • In MHD symmetric systems the equilibrium physical quantities are dependent on two variables only. In this cases it is possible to find a magnetic surface function that has the same symmetry. Under the assumption that the metric determinant is also independent of a third, ignorable coordinate, a general MHD equilibrium equation in curvilinear coordinates is deduced. This equation is specially useful when non-orthogonal generalized coordinates are used.
  • In this work we study the ergodic magnetic limiters (EML) action on field lines from the point of view of a chaotic scattering process, considering the so-called exit basins, or sets of points in the chaotic region which originate field lines hitting the wall in some specified region. We divide the tokamak wall into three areas of equal poloidal angular length, corresponding to different exits for a chaotic field line. In order to obtain the exit basins we used a fine grid chosen inside a small rectangle which comprises a representative part of the chaotic region near the wall. Thus, exit basins were obtained for a tokamak wall with reversed magnetic shear. The nontwist mapping describes the perturbed magnetic field lines with two twin chains of magnetic islands and chaotic field lines in their vicinity. For a perturbing resonant magnetic field with a fixed helicity, the observed escape pattern changes with the perturbation intensity.