• We constrain the stellar population properties of a sample of 52 massive galaxies, with stellar mass $\log M_s/M_\odot>10.5$, over the redshift range 0.5<z<2 by use of observer-frame optical and near-infrared slitless spectra from Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 grisms. The deep exposures allow us to target individual spectra of massive galaxies to F160W=22.5AB. Our fitting approach uses a set of six base models adapted to the redshift and spectral resolution of each observation, and fits the weights of the base models via a MCMC method. The sample comprises a mixed distribution of quiescent (19) and star-forming galaxies (33). Using the cumulative distribution of stellar ages by mass, we define a "quenching timescale" that is found to correlate with stellar mass. The other population parameters, aside from metallicity, do not show such a strong correlation, although all display the characteristic segregation between quiescent and star-forming populations. Radial colour gradients within each galaxy are also explored, finding a wider scatter in the star-forming subsample, but no conclusive trend with respect to the population parameters. Environment is also studied, with at most a subtle effect towards older ages in high-density environments.
  • We improve the accuracy of photometric redshifts by including low-resolution spectral data from the G102 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope, which assists in redshift determination by further constraining the shape of the broadband Spectral Energy Disribution (SED) and identifying spectral features. The photometry used in the redshift fits includes near-IR photometry from FIGS+CANDELS, as well as optical data from ground-based surveys and HST ACS, and mid-IR data from Spitzer. We calculated the redshifts through the comparison of measured photometry with template galaxy models, using the EAZY photometric redshift code. For objects with F105W $< 26.5$ AB mag with a redshift range of $0 < z < 6$, we find a typical error of $\Delta z = 0.03 * (1+z)$ for the purely photometric redshifts; with the addition of FIGS spectra, these become $\Delta z = 0.02 * (1+z)$, an improvement of 50\%. Addition of grism data also reduces the outlier rate from 8\% to 7\% across all fields. With the more-accurate spectrophotometric redshifts (SPZs), we searched the FIGS fields for galaxy overdensities. We identified 24 overdensities across the 4 fields. The strongest overdensity, matching a spectroscopically identified cluster at $z=0.85$, has 28 potential member galaxies, of which 8 have previous spectroscopic confirmation, and features a corresponding X-ray signal. Another corresponding to a cluster at $z=1.84$ has 22 members, 18 of which are spectroscopically confirmed. Additionally, we find 4 overdensities that are detected at an equal or higher significance in at least one metric to the two confirmed clusters.
  • In this paper we investigate whether the stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies depends on their host environment. To this purpose, we have selected a sample of early-type galaxies from the SPIDER catalogue, characterized their environment through the group catalogue of Wang et al. and used their optical SDSS spectra to constrain the IMF slope, through the analysis of IMF-sensitive spectral indices. To reach a high enough signal-to-noise ratio, we have stacked spectra in velocity dispersion ($\sigma_0$) bins, on top of separating the sample by galaxy hierarchy and host halo mass, as proxies for galaxy environment. In order to constrain the IMF, we have compared observed line strengths to predictions of MIUSCAT/EMILES synthetic stellar population models, with varying age, metallicity, and "bimodal" (low-mass tapered) IMF slope ($\rm \Gamma_b$). Consistent with previous studies, we find that $\rm \Gamma_b$ increases with $\sigma_0$, becoming bottom-heavy (i.e. an excess of low-mass stars with respect to the Milky-Way-like IMF) at high $\sigma_0$. We find that this result is robust against the set of isochrones used in the stellar population models, as well as the way the effect of elemental abundance ratios is taken into account. We thus conclude that it is possible to use currently state-of-the-art stellar population models and intermediate resolution spectra to consistently probe IMF variations. For the first time, we show that there is no dependence of $\Gamma_b$ on environment or galaxy hierarchy, as measured within the $3"$ SDSS fibre, thus leaving the IMF as an intrinsic galaxy property, possibly set already at high redshift.
  • We present an analysis of the global stellar populations of galaxies in the SAMI Galaxy Survey. Our sample consists of 1319 galaxies spanning four orders of magnitude in stellar mass and includes all morphologies and environments. We derive luminosity-weighted, single stellar population equivalent stellar ages, metallicities and alpha enhancements from spectra integrated within one effective radius apertures. Variations in galaxy size explain the majority of the scatter in the age--mass and metallicity--mass relations. Stellar populations vary systematically in the plane of galaxy size and stellar mass, such that galaxies with high stellar surface mass density are older, more metal-rich and alpha-enhanced than less dense galaxies. Galaxies with high surface mass densities have a very narrow range of metallicities, however, at fixed mass, the spread in metallicity increases substantially with increasing galaxy size (decreasing density). We identify residual correlations with morphology and environment. At fixed mass and size, galaxies with late-type morphologies, small bulges and low Sersic n are younger than early-type, high n, high bulge-to-total galaxies. Age and metallicity both show small residual correlations with environment; at fixed mass and size, galaxies in denser environments or more massive halos are older and somewhat more metal rich than those in less dense environments. We connect these trends to evolutionary tracks within the size--mass plane.
  • The Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS) is a deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3/IR (Wide Field Camera 3 Infrared) slitless spectroscopic survey of four deep fields. Two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) area and two fields are located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) area. One of the southern fields selected is the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. Each of these four fields were observed using the WFC3/G102 grism (0.8$\mu m$-1.15$\mu m$ continuous coverage) with a total exposure time of 40 orbits (~ 100 kilo-seconds) per field. This reaches a 3 sigma continuum depth of ~26 AB magnitudes and probes emission lines to $\approx 10^{-17}\ erg\ s^{-1} \ cm^{-2}$. This paper details the four FIGS fields and the overall observational strategy of the project. A detailed description of the Simulation Based Extraction (SBE) method used to extract and combine over 10000 spectra of over 2000 distinct sources brighter than m_F105W=26.5 mag is provided. High fidelity simulations of the observations is shown to significantly improve the background subtraction process, the spectral contamination estimates, and the final flux calibration. This allows for the combination of multiple spectra to produce a final high quality, deep, 1D-spectra for each object in the survey.
  • Systematic variations of the IMF in early-type galaxies, and their connection with possible drivers such as velocity dispersion or metallicity, have been much debated in recent years. Strong lensing over galaxy scales combined with photometric and spectroscopic data provides a powerful method to constrain the stellar mass-to-light ratio and hence the functional form of the IMF. We combine photometric and spectroscopic constraints from the latest set of population synthesis models of Charlot & Bruzual, including a varying IMF, with a non-parametric analysis of the lens masses of 18 ETGs from the SLACS survey, with velocity dispersions in the range 200-300 km/s. We find that very bottom-heavy IMFs are excluded. However, the upper limit to the bimodal IMF slope ($\mu \lesssim 2.2$, accounting for a dark matter fraction of 20-30%, where $\mu=1.3$ corresponds to a Kroupa-like IMF) is compatible at the $1\sigma$ level with constraints imposed by gravity-sensitive line strengths. A two-segment power law parameterisation of the IMF (Salpeter-like for high masses) is more constrained ($\Gamma \lesssim 1.5$, where $\Gamma$ is the power index at low masses) but requires a dark matter contribution of $\gtrsim 25\%$ to reconcile the results with a Salpeter IMF. For a standard Milky Way-like IMF to be applicable, a significant dark matter contribution is required within $1R_e$. Our results reveal a large range of allowed IMF slopes, which, when interpreted as intrinsic scatter in the IMF properties of ETGs, could explain the recent results of Smith et al., who find Milky Way-like IMF normalisations in a few massive lensing ETGs.
  • Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disk decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or disks of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a "compact core" as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ~ 0.1, there are "abundant" compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ~ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red nuggets with elliptical galaxies, a comparable fraction of red nuggets might have ended up embedded in disks. This result generalises the inside-out formation scenario; present-day massive galaxies can begin as dense spheroidal cores (red nuggets), around which either a spheroidal halo or a disk are formed later.
  • We measure the projected density profile, shape and alignment of the stellar and dark matter mass distribution in 11 strong-lens galaxies. We find that the projected dark matter density profile - under the assumption of a Chabrier stellar initial mass function - shows significant variation from galaxy to galaxy. Those with an outermost image beyond $\sim 10$ kpc are very well fit by a projected NFW profile; those with images within 10 kpc appear to be more concentrated than NFW, as expected if their dark haloes contract due to baryonic cooling. We find that over several half-light radii, the dark matter haloes of these lenses are rounder than their stellar mass distributions. While the haloes are never more elliptical than $e_{dm} = 0.2$, their stars can extend to $e_* > 0.2$. Galaxies with high dark matter ellipticity and weak external shear show strong alignment between light and dark; those with strong shear ($\gamma \gtrsim 0.1$) can be highly misaligned. This is reassuring since isolated misaligned galaxies are expected to be unstable. Our results provide a new constraint on galaxy formation models. For a given cosmology, these must explain the origin of both very round dark matter haloes and misaligned strong-lens systems.
  • Variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF) have been invoked to explain the spectroscopic and dynamical properties of early-type galaxies. However, no observations have yet been able to disentangle the physical driver. We analyse here a sample of 24 early-type galaxies drawn from the CALIFA survey, deriving in a homogeneous way their stellar population and kinematic properties. We find that the local IMF is tightly related to the local metallicity, becoming more bottom-heavy towards metal-rich populations. Our result, combined with the galaxy mass-metallicity relation, naturally explains previous claims of a galaxy mass-IMF relation, derived from non-IFU spectra. If we assume that - within the star formation environment of early-type galaxies - metallicity is the main driver of IMF variations, a significant revision of the interpretation of galaxy evolution observables is necessary.
  • The hypothesis of a universal initial mass function (IMF) -- motivated by observations in nearby stellar systems -- has been recently challenged by the discovery of a systematic variation of the IMF with the central velocity dispersion, {\sigma}, of early-type galaxies (ETGs), towards an excess of low-mass stars in high-{\sigma} galaxies. This trend has been derived so far from integrated spectra, and remains unexplained at present. To test whether such trend depends on the local properties within a galaxy, we have obtained new, extremely deep, spectroscopic data, for three nearby ETGs, two galaxies with high {\sigma} (~300 km/s), and one lower mass system, with {\sigma} ~ 100 km/s. From the analysis of IMF-sensitive spectral features, we find that the IMF depends significantly on galactocentric distance in the massive ETGs, with the enhanced fraction of low-mass stars f mostly confined to their central regions. In contrast, the low-{\sigma} galaxy does not show any significant radial gradient in the IMF, well described by a shallower distribution, relative to the innermost regions of massive galaxies, at all radii. Such a result indicates that the IMF should be regarded as a local (rather than global) property, and suggests a significant difference between the formation process of the core and the outer regions of massive ETGs.
  • We analyse the stellar populations in the host galaxies of 53 X-ray selected optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGN) at 0.34<z<1.07 with ultra-deep (m=26.5) optical medium-band (R~50) photometry from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS). The spectral resolution of SHARDS allows us to consistently measure the strength of the 4000 AA break, Dn(4000), a reliable age indicator for stellar populations. We confirm that most X-ray selected moderate-luminosity AGN (L_X<10^44 erg/s) are hosted by massive galaxies (typically M*>10^10.5 M_sun) and that the observed fraction of galaxies hosting an AGN increases with the stellar mass. A careful selection of random control samples of inactive galaxies allows us to remove the stellar mass and redshift dependencies of the AGN fraction to explore trends with several stellar age indicators. We find no significant differences in the distribution of the rest-frame U-V colour for AGN hosts and inactive galaxies, in agreement with previous results. However, we find significantly shallower 4000 AA breaks in AGN hosts, indicative of younger stellar populations. With the help of a model-independent determination of the extinction, we obtain extinction-corrected U-V colours and light-weighted average stellar ages. We find that AGN hosts have younger stellar populations and higher extinction compared to inactive galaxies with the same stellar mass and at the same redshift. We find a highly significant excess of AGN hosts with Dn(4000)~1.4 and light weighted average stellar ages of 300-500 Myr, as well as a deficit of AGN in intrinsic red galaxies. We interpret failure in recognising these trends in previous studies as a consequence of the balancing effect in observed colours of the age-extinction degeneracy.
  • We analyse the Tully-Fisher relation at moderate redshift from the point of view of the underlying stellar populations, by comparing optical and NIR photometry with a phenomenological model that combines population synthesis with a simple prescription for chemical enrichment. The sample comprises 108 late-type galaxies extracted from the FORS Deep Field (FDF) and William Herschel Deep Field (WHDF) surveys at z<1 (median redshift z=0.45). A correlation is found between stellar mass and the parameters that describe the star formation history, with massive galaxies forming their populations early (zFOR~3), with star formation timescales, tau1~4Gyr; although with very efficient chemical enrichment timescales (tau2~1Gyr). In contrast, the stellar-to-dynamical mass ratio - which, in principle, would track the efficiency of feedback in the baryonic processes driving galaxy formation - does not appear to correlate with the model parameters. On the Tully-Fisher plane, no significant age segregation is found at fixed circular speed, whereas at fixed stellar-to-dynamical mass fraction, age splits the sample, with older galaxies having faster circular speeds at fixed Ms/Mdyn. Although our model does not introduce any prior constraint on dust reddening, we obtain a strong correlation between colour excess and stellar mass.
  • Recent evidence based independently on spectral line strengths and dynamical modelling point towards a non-universal stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF), probably implying an excess of low-mass stars in elliptical galaxies with a high velocity dispersion. Here we show that a time-independent bottom-heavy IMF is compatible neither with the observed metal-rich populations found in giant ellipticals nor with the number of stellar remnants observed within these systems. We suggest a two-stage formation scenario involving a time-dependent IMF to reconcile these observational constraints. In this model, an early strong star-bursting stage with a top-heavy IMF is followed by a more prolonged stage with a bottom-heavy IMF. Such model is physically motivated by the fact that a sustained high star formation will bring the interstellar medium to a state of pressure, temperature and turbulence that can drastically alter the fragmentation of the gaseous component into small clumps, promoting the formation of low-mass stars. This toy model is in good agreement with the different observational constrains on massive elliptical galaxies, such as age, metallicity, alpha-enhancement, M/L, or the mass fraction of the stellar component in low-mass stars.
  • We report on results from the analysis of a stellar mass-selected (log M*>9.0) sample of 1644 galaxies at 0.65<z<1.1 with ultra-deep (m<26.5) optical medium-band (R~50) photometry from the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS). The spectral resolution of SHARDS allows us to consistently measure the strength of the 4000 Angstrom spectral break [Dn(4000), an excellent age indicator for the stellar populations of quiescent galaxies] for all galaxies at z~0.9 down to log M*9. The Dn(4000) index cannot be resolved from broad-band photometry, and measurements from optical spectroscopic surveys are typically limited to galaxies at least x10 more massive. When combined with the rest-frame U-V colour, Dn(4000) provides a powerful diagnostic of the extinction affecting the stellar population that is relatively insensitive to degeneracies with age, metallicity or star formation history. We use this novel approach to estimate de-reddened colours and light-weighted stellar ages for individual sources. We explore the relationships linking stellar mass, (U-V), and Dn(4000) for the sources in the sample, and compare them to those found in local galaxies. The main results are: a) both Dn(4000) and (U-V) correlate with M*. The dispersion in Dn(4000) values at a given M* increases with M*, while the dispersion for (U-V) decreases due to the higher average extinction prevalent in massive star-forming galaxies. b) for massive galaxies, we find a smooth transition between the blue cloud and red sequence in the intrinsic U-V colour, in contrast with other recent results. c) at a fixed stellar age, we find a positive correlation between extinction and stellar mass. d) the fraction of sources with declining or halted star formation increases steeply with the stellar mass, from ~5% at log M*~9.0-9.5 to ~80% at log M*>11, in agreement with downsizing scenarios.
  • We present observations of a luminous galaxy at redshift z=6.573 --- the end of the reioinization epoch --- which has been spectroscopically confirmed twice. The first spectroscopic confirmation comes from slitless HST ACS grism spectra from the PEARS survey (Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically), which show a dramatic continuum break in the spectrum at restframe 1216 A wavelength. The second confirmation is done with Keck + DEIMOS. The continuum is not clearly detected with ground-based spectra, but high wavelength resolution enables the Lyman alpha emission line profile to be determined. We compare the line profile to composite line profiles at redshift z=4.5. The Lyman alpha line profile shows no signature of a damping wing attenuation, confirming that the intergalactic gas is ionized at redshift z=6.57. Spectra of Lyman breaks at yet higher redshifts will be possible using comparably deep observations with IR-sensitive grisms, even at redshifts where Lyman alpha is too attenuated by the neutral IGM to be detectable using traditional spectroscopy from the ground.
  • The validity of MOND and TeVeS models of modified gravity has been recently tested by using lensing techniques, with the conclusion that a non-trivial component in the form of dark matter is needed in order to match the observations. In this work those analyses are extended by comparing lensing to stellar masses for a sample of nine strong gravitational lenses that probe galactic scales. The sample is extracted from a recent work that presents the mass profile out to a few effective radii, therefore reaching into regions that are dominated by dark matter in the standard (general relativity) scenario. A range of interpolating functions are explored to test the validity of MOND/TeVeS in these systems. Out of the nine systems, there are five robust candidates with a significant excess (higher that 50%) of lensing mass with respect to stellar mass, irrespective of the stellar initial mass function. One of these lenses (Q0957) is located at the centre of a galactic cluster. This system might be accommodated in MOND/TeVeS via the addition of a hot component, like a 2 eV neutrino, that contribute over cluster scales. However, the other four robust candidates (LBQS1009, HE1104, B1600, HE2149) are located in field/group regions, so that a cold component (CDM) would be required even within the MOND/TeVeS framework. Our results therefore do not support recent claims that these alternative scenarios to CDM can survive astrophysical data.
  • (Abridged) We present the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources (SHARDS), an ESO/GTC Large Program carried out with GTC/OSIRIS. SHARDS is an ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric survey of the GOODS-N field (130 arcmin^2) at wavelengths 500 to 950 nm and using 24 contiguous medium-band filters (spectral resolution R 50). The data reach 26.5 mag (>3-sigma level) with sub-arcsec seeing in all bands. SHARDS main goal is obtaining accurate physical properties of interm- and high-z galaxies using well-sampled optical SEDs with sufficient spectral resolution to measure absorption and emission features. Among the different populations of high-z galaxies, SHARDS principal targets are massive quiescent galaxies at z>1. In this paper, we outline the observational strategy and include a detailed discussion of the special reduction and calibration procedures applied to the GTC/OSIRIS data. We present science demonstration results about the detection and study of emission-line galaxies (star-forming and AGN) at z=0-5. We also analyze the SEDs for a sample of 27 quiescent massive galaxies at 1.0<z<1.4. We discuss on the improvements introduced by the SHARDS dataset in the analysis of their SFH and stellar properties. We discuss the systematics arising from the use of different stellar population libraries. We find that the UV-to-MIR SEDs of the massive quiescent galaxies at z=1.0-1.5 are well described by an exponential decaying SFH with scale tau=100-200 Myr, age 1.5-2.0 Gyr, solar or slightly sub-solar metallicity, and moderate extinction, A(V)~0.5 mag. We also find that galaxies with masses above M* are typically older than lighter galaxies, as expected in a downsizing scenario of galaxy formation. This trend is, however, model dependent, i.e., it is significantly more evident in the results obtained with some stellar population synthesis libraries and almost absent in others.
  • (Abridged) We present here a detailed analysis of the star formation history (SFH) of FW4871, a massive galaxy at z=1.893+-0.002. We compare rest-frame optical and NUV slitless grism spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope with a large set of composite stellar populations to constrain the underlying star formation history. Even though the morphology features prominent tidal tails, indicative of a recent merger, there is no sign of on-going star formation within an aperture encircling one effective radius, which corresponds to a physical extent of 2.6 kpc. A model assuming truncation of an otherwise constant SFH gives a formation epoch zF~10, with a truncation after 2.7 Gyr, giving a mass-weighted age of 1.5 Gyr and a stellar mass of 0.8-3E11Msun, implying star formation rates of 30-110 Msun/yr. A more complex model including a recent burst of star formation places the age of the youngest component at 145 Myr, with a mass contribution lower than 20%, and a maximum amount of dust reddening of E(B-V)<0.4 mag (95% confidence levels). This low level of dust reddening is consistent with the low emission observed at 24 micron, corresponding to rest-frame 8 micron, where PAH emission should contribute significantly if a strong formation episode were present. The colour profile of FW4871 does not suggest a significant radial trend in the properties of the stellar populations out to 3Re. We suggest that the recent merger that formed FW4871 is responsible for the quenching of its star formation.
  • We study the star forming regions in the spiral galaxy NGC4321, taking advantage of the spatial resolution (2.5 arcsec FWHM) of the Swift/UVOT camera and the availability of three UV passbands in the region 1600-3000 A, in combination with optical and IR imaging from SDSS, KPNO/Ha and Spitzer/IRAC, to obtain a catalogue of 787 star forming regions out to three disc scale lengths. We determine the properties of the young stellar component and its relationship with the spiral arms. The Ha luminosities of the sources have a strong decreasing radial trend, suggesting more massive star forming regions in the central part of the galaxy. When segregated with respect to NUV-optical colour, blue sources have a significant excess of flux in the IR at 8 micron, revealing the contribution from PAHs, although the overall reddening of these sources stays below E(B-V)=0.2 mag. The distribution of distances to the spiral arms is compared for subsamples selected according to Ha luminosity, NUV-optical colour, or ages derived from a population synthesis model. An offset is expected between these subsamples as a function of radius if the pattern speed of the spiral arm were constant - as predicted by classic density wave theory. No significant offsets are found, favouring instead a mechanism where the pattern speed has a radial dependence.
  • Galaxies are found to obey scaling relations between a number of observables. These relations follow different trends at the low- and the high-mass ends. The processes driving the curvature of scaling relations remain uncertain. In this letter, we focus on the specific family of early-type galaxies, deriving the star formation histories of a complete sample of visually classified galaxies from SDSS-DR7 over the redshift range 0.01<z<0.025, covering a stellar mass interval from 10^9 to 3 x 10^11 Msun. Our sample features the characteristic "knee" in the surface brightness vs. mass distribution at Mstar~3 x 10^10 Msun. We find a clear difference between the age and metallicity distributions of the stellar populations above and beyond this knee, which suggests a sudden transition from a constant, highly efficient mode of star formation in high-mass galaxies, gradually decreasing towards the low-mass end of the sample. At fixed mass, our early-type sample is more efficient in building up the stellar content at early times in comparison to the general population of galaxies, with half of the stars already in place by redshift z~2 for all masses. The metallicity-age trend in low-mass galaxies is not compatible with infall of metal-poor gas, suggesting instead an outflow-driven relation.
  • We show the radial dependence of stellar baryon fraction curves derived for 21 lensing galaxies from the CfA-Arizona Space Telescope LEns Survey by means of stellar population synthesis and pixel-based mass reconstruction. The sample covers a stellar mass range of Ms~2x10^9-3x10^11 Msol (solar masses) which corresponds to a total mass range of ML~7x10^9-3x10^12 Msol on scales from 0.25 to 5 Re (effective radii). By examining the Ms-to-ML dependence on radial distance to the center of each galaxy we find pairs of lenses on small to intermediate mass scales which approach at large radii the same values for their enclosed total mass but exhibit very different stellar masses and stellar baryon fractions. This behaviour subsides for the most massive lenses. All baryon fraction profiles show that the dark matter halo overtakes the stellar content between 1.5 and 2.5 Re. We find evidence for a stellar baryon fraction steadily declining over the full mass range. We shed light on the Fundamental Plane puzzle by showing that the slope of the ML(<R)-to-Ms(<R) relation approaches the mass-to-light relation of recent Fundamental Plane studies at large radii. Less massive dark matter halos turn out to be influenced by the distribution of stellar matter on resolved scales below 10 kpc. The ongoing study of resolved baryon fraction profiles will make it possible to evaluate the validity of star formation models as well as adiabatic contraction prescriptions commonly used in simulations. [abridged]
  • We have explored the buildup of the local mass-size relation of elliptical galaxies using two visually classified samples. At low redshift we compiled a subsample of 2,656 elliptical galaxies from SDSS, whereas at higher redshift (up to z~1) we extracted a sample of 228 object from the HST/ACS images of the GOODS. All the galaxies in our study have spectroscopic data, allowing us to determine the age and mass of the stellar component. Using the fossil record information contained in the stellar populations of our local sample, we do not find any evidence for an age segregation at a given stellar mass depending on the size of the galaxies. At a fixed dynamical mass there is only a <9% size difference in the two extreme age quartiles of our sample. Consequently, the local evidence does not support a scenario whereby the present-day mass-size relation has been progressively established via a bottom-up sequence, where older galaxies occupy the lower part this relation, remaining in place since their formation. We find a trend in size that is insensitive to the age of the stellar populations, at least since z~1. This result supports the idea that the stellar mass-size relation is formed at z~1, with all galaxies populating a region which roughly corresponds to 1/2 of the present size distribution. The fact that the evolution in size is independent of stellar age, together with the absence of an increase in the scatter of the relationship with redshift does not support the puffing up mechanism. The observational evidence, however, can not reject at this stage the minor merging hypothesis. We have made an estimation of the number of minor merger events necessary to bring the high-z galaxies into the local relation compatible with the observed size evolution. Since z=0.8, if the merger mass ratio is 1:3 we estimate ~3+-1 minor mergers and if the ratio is 1:10 we obtain ~8+-2 events.
  • The low-mass end of the stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) is constrained by focusing on the baryon-dominated central regions of strong lensing galaxies. We study in this letter the Einstein Cross (Q2237+0305), a z=0.04 barred galaxy whose bulge acts as lens on a background quasar. The positions of the four quasar images constrain the surface mass density on the lens plane, whereas the surface brightness (H-band NICMOS/HST imaging) along with deep spectroscopy of the lens (VLT/FORS1) allow us to constrain the stellar mass content, for a range of IMFs. We find that a classical single power law (Salpeter IMF) predicts more stellar mass than the observed lensing estimates. This result is confirmed at the 99% confidence level, and is robust to systematic effects due to the choice of population synthesis models, the presence of dust, or the complex disk/bulge population mix. Our non-parametric methodology is more robust than kinematic estimates, as we do not need to make any assumptions about the dynamical state of the galaxy or its decomposition into bulge and disk. Over a range of low-mass power law slopes (with Salpeter being Gamma=+1.35) we find that at a 90% confidence level, slopes with Gamma>0 are ruled out.
  • The Galactic population of open clusters provides an insight into star formation in the Galaxy. The open cluster catalogue by Dias et al.(2002b) is a rich source of data, including kinematic information. This large sample made it possible to carry out a systematic analysis of 481 open cluster orbits, using parameters based on orbit eccentricity and separation from the Galactic plane. These two parameters may be indicative of origin, and we find them to be correlated. We also find them to be correlated with metallicity, another parameter suggested elsewhere to be a marker for origin in that high values of any of these two parameters generally indicates a low metallicity ([Fe/H] Solar$<-$0.2 dex). The resulting analysis points to four open clusters in the catalogue being of extra-Galactic origin by impact of high velocity cloud on the disk: Berkeley21, 32, 99, and Melotte66, with a possible further four due to this origin (NGC2158, 2420, 7789, IC1311). A further three may be due to Galactic globular cluster impact on the disk i.e of internal Galactic origin (NGC6791, 1817, and 7044).
  • We have investigated the radial g-r color gradients of early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR6 in the redshift range 0.00<z<0.06. The majority of massive early-type galaxies show a negative color gradient (red-cored) as generally expected for early-type galaxies. On the other hand, roughly 30 per cent of the galaxies in this sample show a positive color gradient (blue-cored). These "blue-cored" galaxies often show strong H beta absorption line strengths and/or emission line ratios that are indicative of the presence of young stellar populations. Combining the optical data with Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) UV photometry, we find that all blue-cored galaxies show UV-optical colors that can only be explained by young stellar populations. This implies that most of the residual star formation in early-type galaxies is centrally concentrated. Blue-cored galaxies are predominantly low velocity dispersion systems. A simple model shows that the observed positive color gradients (blue-cored) are visible only for a billion years after a star formation episode for the typical strength of recent star formation. The observed effective radius decreases and the mean surface brightness increases due to this centrally-concentrated star formation episode. As a result, the majority of blue-cored galaxies may lie on different regions in the Fundamental Plane from red-cored ellipticals. However, the position of the blue-cored galaxies on the Fundamental Plane cannot be solely attributed to recent star formation but require substantially lower velocity dispersion. We conclude that a low-level of residual star formation persists at the centers of most of low-mass early-type galaxies, whereas massive ones are mostly quiescent systems with metallicity-driven red cores.