• The recent discovery of a $\gamma$-ray counterpart to a gravitational wave (GW) event has put extremely stringent constraints on the speed of gravitational waves at the present epoch. In turn, these constraints place strong theoretical pressure on potential modifications of gravity, essentially allowing only the conformal sector to be active in the present Universe. In this paper, we show that direct detection of gravitational waves from optically identified sources can also measure or constrain the conformal sector of modified gravity models through the time variation of the Planck mass. As a first rough estimate, we find that the LISA satellite can measure the dimensionless time variation of the Planck mass (the so-called parameter $\alpha_M$) at redshift around 1.5 with an error of about 0.03 to 0.13, depending on the assumptions concerning future observations. Stronger constraints can be achieved once reliable distance indicators at $z>2$ are developed, or with GW detectors that extend the capabilities of LISA, like the proposed Big Bang Observer. We emphasize that, just like the constraints on the gravitational speed, the bound on $\alpha_M$ is independent of the cosmological model.
  • The detection of an electromagnetic counterpart (GRB 170817A) to the gravitational wave signal (GW170817) from the merger of two neutron stars opens a completely new arena for testing theories of gravity. We show that this measurement allows us to place stringent constraints on general scalar-tensor and vector-tensor theories, while allowing us to place an independent bound on the graviton mass in bimetric theories of gravity. These constraints severely reduce the viable range of cosmological models that have been proposed as alternatives to general relativistic cosmology.
  • We present the public version of hi_class (www.hiclass-code.net), an extension of the Boltzmann code CLASS to a broad ensemble of modifications to general relativity. In particular, hi_class can calculate predictions for models based on Horndeski's theory, which is the most general scalar-tensor theory described by second-order equations of motion and encompasses any perfect-fluid dark energy, quintessence, Brans-Dicke, $f(R)$ and covariant Galileon models. hi_class has been thoroughly tested and can be readily used to understand the impact of alternative theories of gravity on linear structure formation as well as for cosmological parameter extraction.
  • We use large-scale cosmological observations to place constraints on the dark-matter pressure, sound speed and viscosity, and infer a limit on the mass of warm-dark-matter particles. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the equation of state and sound speed of the dark matter at last scattering at the per mille level. Since the redshifting of collisionless particles universally implies that these quantities scale like $a^{-2}$ absent shell crossing, we infer that today $w_{\rm (DM)}< 10^{-10.0}$, $c_{\rm s,(DM)}^2 < 10^{-10.7}$ and $c_{\rm vis, (DM)}^{2} < 10^{-10.3}$ at the $99\%$ confidence level. This very general bound can be translated to model-dependent constraints on dark-matter models: for warm dark matter these constraints imply $m> 70$ eV, assuming it decoupled while relativistic around the same time as the neutrinos; for a cold relic, we show that $m>100$ eV. We separately constrain the properties of the DM fluid on linear scales at late times, and find upper bounds $c_{\rm s, (DM)}^2<10^{-5.9}$, $c_{\rm vis, (DM)}^{2} < 10^{-5.7}$, with no detection of non-dust properties for the DM.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We point out that the observed time delay between the detection of the signal at the Hanford and Livingston LIGO sites from the gravitational wave event GW150914 places an upper bound on the speed of propagation of gravitational waves, $c_{gw}\lesssim 1.7$ in the units of speed of light. Combined with the lower bound from the absence of gravitational Cherenkov losses by cosmic rays that rules out most of subluminal velocities, this gives a model-independent double-sided constraint $1\lesssim c_{gw}\lesssim 1.7$. We compare this result to model-specific constraints from pulsar timing and cosmology.
  • Despite its continued observational successes, there is a persistent (and growing) interest in extending cosmology beyond the standard model, $\Lambda$CDM. This is motivated by a range of apparently serious theoretical issues, involving such questions as the cosmological constant problem, the particle nature of dark matter, the validity of general relativity on large scales, the existence of anomalies in the CMB and on small scales, and the predictivity and testability of the inflationary paradigm. In this paper, we summarize the current status of $\Lambda$CDM as a physical theory, and review investigations into possible alternatives along a number of different lines, with a particular focus on highlighting the most promising directions. While the fundamental problems are proving reluctant to yield, the study of alternative cosmologies has led to considerable progress, with much more to come if hopes about forthcoming high-precision observations and new theoretical ideas are fulfilled.
  • We investigate the limits of applicability of the quasi-static approximation in cosmologies featuring general models of dark energy or modified gravity. We show that, at best, the quasi-static approximation breaks down outside of the sound horizon of the dark-energy, rather than the cosmological horizon as is frequently assumed. When the sound speed of dark energy is significantly below that of light, the quasi-static limit is only valid in a limited range of observable scales and this must be taken into account when computing effects on observations in such models. As an order of magnitude estimate, in the analysis of data from today's weak-lensing and peculiar-velocity surveys, dark energy can be modelled as quasi-static only if the sound speed is larger than order 1% of that of light. In upcoming surveys, such as Euclid, it should only be used when the sound speed exceeds around 10% of the speed of light. In the analysis of the cosmic microwave background, the quasi-static limit should never be used for the integrated Sachs-Wolf effect and for lensing only when the sound speed exceeds 10% of the speed of light.
  • The latest Planck results reconfirm the existence of a slight but chronic tension between the best-fit Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and low-redshift observables: power seems to be consistently lacking in the late universe across a range of observables (e.g.~weak lensing, cluster counts). We propose a two-parameter model for dark energy where the dark energy is sufficiently like dark matter at large scales to keep the CMB unchanged but where it does not cluster at small scales, preventing concordance collapse and erasing power. We thus exploit the generic scale-dependence of dark energy instead of the more usual time-dependence to address the tension in the data. The combination of CMB, distance and weak lensing data somewhat prefer our model to $\Lambda$CDM, at $\Delta\chi^2=2.4$. Moreover, this improved solution has $\sigma_8=0.79 \pm 0.02$, consistent with the value implied by cluster counts.
  • A perfect irrotational fluid with the equation of state of dust, Irrotational Dark Matter (IDM), is incapable of virializing and instead forms a cosmoskeleton of filaments with supermassive black holes at the joints. This stark difference from the standard cold dark matter (CDM) scenario arises because IDM must exhibit potential flow at all times, preventing shell-crossing from occurring. This scenario is applicable to general non-oscillating scalar-field theories with a small sound speed. Our model of combined IDM and CDM components thereby provides a solution to the problem of forming the observed billion-solar-mass black holes at redshifts of six and higher. In particular, as a result of the reduced vortical flow, the growth of the black holes is expected to be more rapid at later times as compared to the standard scenario.
  • There is an approximately 9% discrepancy, corresponding to 2.4sigma, between two independent constraints on the expansion rate of the universe: one indirectly arising from the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations, and one more directly obtained from local measurements of the relation between redshifts and distances to sources. We argue that by taking into account the local gravitational potential at the position of the observer this tension - strengthened by the recent Planck results - is partially relieved and the concordance of the standard model of cosmology increased. We estimate that measurements of the local Hubble constant are subject to a cosmic variance of about 2.4% (limiting the local sample to redshifts z>0.010) or 1.3% (limiting it to z>0.023), a more significant correction than that taken into account already. Nonetheless, we show that one would need a very rare fluctuation to fully explain the offset in the Hubble rates. If this tension is further strengthened, a cosmology beyond the standard model may prove necessary.
  • We point out that theories of cosmological acceleration which have equation of state, w, such that 1+w is small but positive may still secretly violate the null energy condition. This violation implies the existence of observers for whom the background has infinitely negative energy densities, despite the fact that the perturbations are free of ghosts and gradient instabilities.
  • We present a new prescription for analysing cosmological perturbations in a more-general class of scalar-field dark-energy models where the energy-momentum tensor has an imperfect-fluid form. This class includes Brans-Dicke models, f(R) gravity, theories with kinetic gravity braiding and generalised galileons. We employ the intuitive language of fluids, allowing us to explicitly maintain a dependence on physical and potentially measurable properties. We demonstrate that hydrodynamics is not always a valid description for describing cosmological perturbations in general scalar-field theories and present a consistent alternative that nonetheless utilises the fluid language. We apply this approach explicitly to a worked example: k-essence non-minimally coupled to gravity. This is the simplest case which captures the essential new features of these imperfect-fluid models. We demonstrate the generic existence of a new scale separating regimes where the fluid is perfect and imperfect. We obtain the equations for the evolution of dark-energy density perturbations in both these regimes. The model also features two other known scales: the Compton scale related to the breaking of shift symmetry and the Jeans scale which we show is determined by the speed of propagation of small scalar-field perturbations, i.e. causality, as opposed to the frequently used definition of the ratio of the pressure and energy-density perturbations.
  • Theories of gravity other than general relativity (GR) can explain the observed cosmic acceleration without a cosmological constant. One such class of theories of gravity is f(R). Metric f(R) theories have been proven to be equivalent to Brans-Dicke (BD) scalar-tensor gravity without a kinetic term. Using this equivalence and a 3+1 decomposition of the theory it has been shown that metric f(R) gravity admits a well-posed initial value problem. However, it has not been proven that the 3+1 evolution equations of metric f(R) gravity preserve the (hamiltonian and momentum) constraints. In this paper we show that this is indeed the case. In addition, we show that the mathematical form of the constraint propagation equations in BD-equilavent f(R) gravity and in f(R) gravity in both the Jordan and Einstein frames, is exactly the same as in the standard ADM 3+1 decomposition of GR. Finally, we point out that current numerical relativity codes can incorporate the 3+1 evolution equations of metric f(R) gravity by modifying the stress-energy tensor and adding an additional scalar field evolution equation. We hope that this work will serve as a starting point for relativists to develop fully dynamical codes for valid f(R) models.
  • We introduce a large class of scalar-tensor models with interactions containing the second derivatives of the scalar field but not leading to additional degrees of freedom. These models exhibit peculiar features, such as an essential mixing of scalar and tensor kinetic terms, which we have named kinetic braiding. This braiding causes the scalar stress tensor to deviate from the perfect-fluid form. Cosmology in these models possesses a rich phenomenology, even in the limit where the scalar is an exact Goldstone boson. Generically, there are attractor solutions where the scalar monitors the behaviour of external matter. Because of the kinetic braiding, the position of the attractor depends both on the form of the Lagrangian and on the external energy density. The late-time asymptotic of these cosmologies is a de Sitter state. The scalar can exhibit phantom behaviour and is able to cross the phantom divide with neither ghosts nor gradient instabilities. These features provide a new class of models for Dark Energy. As an example, we study in detail a simple one-parameter model. The possible observational signatures of this model include a sizeable Early Dark Energy and a specific equation of state evolving into the final de-Sitter state from a healthy phantom regime.
  • We introduce a novel class of field theories where energy always flows along timelike geodesics, mimicking in that respect dust, yet which possess non-zero pressure. This theory comprises two scalar fields, one of which is a Lagrange multiplier enforcing a constraint between the other's field value and derivative. We show that this system possesses no wave-like modes but retains a single dynamical degree of freedom. Thus, the sound speed is always identically zero on all backgrounds. In particular, cosmological perturbations reproduce the standard behaviour for hydrodynamics with vanishing sound speed. Using all these properties we propose a model unifying Dark Matter and Dark Energy in a single degree of freedom. In a certain limit this model exactly reproduces the evolution history of Lambda-CDM, while deviations away from the standard expansion history produce a potentially measurable difference in the evolution of structure.
  • We propose a cosmological scenario based on the assumption that the Standard Model possesses a large number of copies. It is demonstrated that baryons in the hidden copies of the standard model can naturally account for the dark matter. The right abundance of the hidden-sector baryons and the correct spectrum of density perturbations are simultaneously generated during modulated reheating. We show that for the natural values of inflaton coupling constants, dictated by unitarity, the dark-matter abundance is predicted to be proportional to the ratio of observed cosmological parameters: the square of the amplitude of cosmological perturbations and the baryon-to-photon number ratio.
  • We develop a parameterized post-Friedmann (PPF) framework which describes three regimes of modified gravity models that accelerate the expansion without dark energy. On large scales, the evolution of scalar metric and density perturbations must be compatible with the expansion history defined by distance measures. On intermediate scales in the linear regime, they form a scalar-tensor theory with a modified Poisson equation. On small scales in dark matter halos such as our own galaxy, modifications must be suppressed in order to satisfy stringent local tests of general relativity. We describe these regimes with three free functions and two parameters: the relationship between the two metric fluctuations, the large and intermediate scale relationships to density fluctuations and the two scales of the transitions between the regimes. We also clarify the formal equivalence of modified gravity and generalized dark energy. The PPF description of linear fluctuation in f(R) modified action and the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld models show excellent agreement with explicit calculations. Lacking cosmological simulations of these models, our non-linear halo-model description remains an ansatz but one that enables well-motivated consistency tests of general relativity. The required suppression of modifications within dark matter halos suggests that the linear and weakly non-linear regimes are better suited for making complementary test of general relativity than the deeply non-linear regime.
  • We reconcile seemingly conflicting statements in the literature about the behavior of cosmological solutions in modified theories of gravity where the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian for gravity is modified by the addition of a function of the Ricci scalar, f(R). Using the example of f(R) = +/-\mu^4/R we show that only such choices of f(R) where d^2f/dR^2>0 have stable high-curvature limits and well-behaved cosmological solutions with a proper era of matter domination. The remaining models enter a phase dominated by both matter and scalar kinetic energy where the scalar curvature remains low.
  • We study a class of metric-variation f(R) models that accelerates the expansion without a cosmological constant and satisfies both cosmological and solar-system tests in the small-field limit of the parameter space. Solar-system tests alone place only weak bounds on these models, since the additional scalar degree of freedom is locked to the high-curvature general-relativistic prediction across more than 25 orders of magnitude in density, out through the solar corona. This agreement requires that the galactic halo be of sufficient extent to maintain the galaxy at high curvature in the presence of the low-curvature cosmological background. If the galactic halo and local environment in f(R) models do not have substantially deeper potentials than expected in LCDM, then cosmological field amplitudes |f_R| > 10^{-6} will cause the galactic interior to evolve to low curvature during the acceleration epoch. Viability of large-deviation models therefore rests on the structure and evolution of the galactic halo, requiring cosmological simulations of f(R) models, and not directly on solar-system tests. Even small deviations that conservatively satisfy both galactic and solar-system constraints can still be tested by future, percent-level measurements of the linear power spectrum, while they remain undetectable to cosmological-distance measures. Although we illustrate these effects in a specific class of models, the requirements on f(R) are phrased in a nearly model-independent manner.
  • The self-accelerating braneworld model (DGP) can be tested from measurements of the expansion history of the universe and the formation of structure. Current constraints on the expansion history from supernova luminosity distances, the CMB, and the Hubble constant exclude the simplest flat DGP model at about 3sigma. The best-fit open DGP model is, however, only a marginally poorer fit to the data than flat LCDM. Its substantially different expansion history raises structure formation challenges for the model. A dark-energy model with the same expansion history would predict a highly significant discrepancy with the baryon oscillation measurement due the high Hubble constant required and a large enhancement of CMB anisotropies at the lowest multipoles due to the ISW effect. For the DGP model to satisfy these constraints new gravitational phenomena would have to appear at the non-linear and cross-over scales respectively. A prediction of the DGP expansion history in a region where the phenomenology is well understood is that high-redshift galaxies should be substantially correlated with the CMB through the ISW effect. This correlation should provide a sharp test of the DGP model in the future.
  • We develop a scaling ansatz for the master equation in Dvali, Gabadadze, Porrati cosmologies, which allows us to solve the equations of motion for perturbations off the brane during periods when the on-brane evolution is scale-free. This allows us to understand the behavior of the gravitational potentials outside the horizon at high redshifts and close to the horizon today. We confirm that the results of Koyama and Maartens are valid at scales relevant for observations such as galaxy-ISW correlation. At larger scales, there is an additional suppression of the potential which reduces the growth rate even further and would strengthen the ISW effect.
  • We study the evolution of linear cosmological perturbations in f(R) models of accelerated expansion in the physical frame where the gravitational dynamics are fourth order and the matter is minimally coupled. These models predict a rich and testable set of linear phenomena. For each expansion history, fixed empirically by cosmological distance measures, there exists two branches of f(R) solutions that are parameterized by B propto d^2 f/dR^2. For B<0, which include most of the models previously considered, there is a short-timescale instability at high curvature that spoils agreement with high redshift cosmological observables. For the stable B>0 branch, f(R) models can reduce the large-angle CMB anisotropy, alter the shape of the linear matter power spectrum, and qualitatively change the correlations between the CMB and galaxy surveys. All of these phenomena are accessible with current and future data and provide stringent tests of general relativity on cosmological scales.
  • One way to account for the acceleration of the universe is to modify general relativity, rather than introducing dark energy. Typically, such modifications introduce new degrees of freedom. It is interesting to consider models with no new degrees of freedom, but with a modified dependence on the conventional energy-momentum tensor; the Palatini formulation of $f(R)$ theories is one example. Such theories offer an interesting testing ground for investigations of cosmological modified gravity. In this paper we study the evolution of structure in these ``modified-source gravity'' theories. In the linear regime, density perturbations exhibit scale dependent runaway growth at late times and, in particular, a mode of a given wavenumber goes nonlinear at a higher redshift than in the standard $\Lambda$CDM model. We discuss the implications of this behavior and why there are reasons to expect that the growth will be cut off in the nonlinear regime. Assuming that this holds in a full nonlinear analysis, we briefly describe how upcoming measurements may probe the differences between the modified theory and the standard $\Lambda$CDM model.
  • The braneworld model of Dvali, Gabadadze and Porrati (DGP) provides an intriguing modification of gravity at large distances and late times. By embedding a three-brane in an uncompactified extra dimension with separate Einstein-Hilbert terms for both brane and bulk, the DGP model allows for an accelerating universe at late times even in the absence of an explicit vacuum energy. We examine the evolution of cosmological perturbations on large scales in this theory. At late times, perturbations enter a DGP regime in which the effective value of Newton's constant increases as the background density diminishes. This leads to a suppression of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, bringing DGP gravity into slightly better agreement with WMAP data than conventional LCDM. However, we find that this is not enough to compensate for the significantly worse fit to supernova data and the distance to the last-scattering surface in the pure DGP model. LCDM is, therefore, a better fit.