• Tunnelling, one of the key features of quantum mechanics, ignited an ongoing debate about the value, meaning and interpretation of 'tunnelling time'. Until recently the debate was purely theoretical, with the process considered to be instantaneous for all practical purposes. This changed with the development of ultrafast lasers and in particular, the 'attoclock' technique that is used to probe the attosecond dynamics of electrons. Although the initial attoclock measurements hinted at instantaneous tunnelling, later experiments contradicted those findings, claiming to have measured finite tunnelling times. In each case these measurements were performed with multi-electron atoms. Atomic hydrogen (H), the simplest atomic system with a single electron, can be 'exactly' (subject only to numerical limitations) modelled using numerical solutions of the 3D-TDSE with measured experimental parameters and acts as a convenient benchmark for both accurate experimental measurements and calculations. Here we report the first attoclock experiment performed on H and find that our experimentally determined offset angles are in excellent agreement with accurate 3D-TDSE simulations performed using our experimental pulse parameters. The same simulations with a short-range Yukawa potential result in zero offset angles for all intensities. We conclude that the offset angle measured in the attoclock experiments originates entirely from electron scattering by the long-range Coulomb potential with no contribution from tunnelling time delay. That conclusion is supported by empirical observation that the electron offset angles follow closely the simple formula for the deflection angle of electrons undergoing classical Rutherford scattering by the Coulomb potential. Thus we confirm that, in H, tunnelling is instantaneous (with an upperbound of 1.8 as) within our experimental and numerical uncertainty.
  • Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state and leaving behind an isotropic ion are assumed to be angle-independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full 3D momentum resolution, we show that measured time delays between electrons liberated from the $1s^2$ spherically symmetric ground state of helium depend on the emission direction of the electrons relative to the linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light. Such time-delay anisotropy, for which we measure values as large as 60 attoseconds, is caused by the interplay between final quantum states with different symmetry and arises naturally whenever the photoionization process involves the exchange of more than one photon in the field of the parent-ion. With the support of accurate theoretical models, the angular dependence of the time delay is attributed to small phase differences that are induced in the laser-driven continuum transitions to the final states. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics involve the exchange of at least two photons, this is a general, significant, and initially unexpected effect that must be taken into account in all such photoionization measurements.
  • Resolving in time the dynamics of light absorption by atoms and molecules, and the electronic rearrangement this induces, is among the most challenging goals of attosecond spectroscopy. The attoclock is an elegant approach to this problem, which encodes ionization times in the strong-field regime. However, the accurate reconstruction of these times from experimental data presents a formidable theoretical challenge. Here, we solve this problem by combining analytical theory with ab-initio numerical simulations. We apply our theory to numerical attoclock experiments on the hydrogen atom to extract ionization time delays and analyse their nature. Strong field ionization is often viewed as optical tunnelling through the barrier created by the field and the core potential. We show that, in the hydrogen atom, optical tunnelling is instantaneous. By calibrating the attoclock using the hydrogen atom, our method opens the way to identify possible delays associated with multielectron dynamics during strong-field ionization.
  • The two-dimensional sub-cycle-time to electron momentum mapping provided by orthogonal two-color laser fields is applied to photoelectron spectroscopy. Using neon as the example we gain experimental access to the dynamics of emitted electron wave packets in electron momenta spectra measured by coincidence momentum imaging. We demonstrate the opportunities provided by this time-to-momentum mapping by investigating the influence of the parent ion on the emitted electrons on laser-sub-cycle times. It is found that depending on their sub-cycle birth time the trajectories of photoelectrons are affected differently by the ion's Coulomb field.
  • This paper theoretically analyzes the behavior of an atom driven by a strong electro-magnetic field. Moreover, besides traditional quantum mechanics method, we also investigate semiclassical approaches to this problem. We first performed strong field approximation for system of an atom driven by a strong electromagnetic field in velocity gauge. Our simulation result is consistent with theories and close to experiments except some reasonable difference caused by different parameters and omitted bound and final states in the transition amplitude. Next, a new semiclassical approach is used to solve Volkov wave function. We prove that semiclassical approximation works well in predicting the particle evolution in quantum world, especially for system in a strong electromagnetic field with low frequency. Finally, we also briefly illustrated how to use semiclassical approximation to get the same results as strong field approximation and also partly tested the viability of the semiclassical approach to Teller Potential. This part needs future work to accomplish. But still, semiclassical approximation provides a potentially new method to solve complicated system, which might be more effective than traditional quantum mechanics recipe.