• The CCI30 Index (1804.06711)

    March 28, 2018 q-fin.GN
    We describe the design of the CCI30 cryptocurrency index.
  • We take a look the changes of different asset prices over variable periods, using both traditional and spectral methods, and discover universality phenomena which hold (in some cases) across asset classes.
  • The Sharpe ratio is the most widely used risk metric in the quantitative finance community - amazingly, essentially everyone gets it wrong. In this note, we will make a quixotic effort to rectify the situation.
  • We investigate the statistical behavior of the eigenvalues and diameter of random Cayley graphs of ${\rm SL}_2[\mathbb{Z}/p\mathbb{Z}]$ %and the Symmetric group $S_n$ as the prime number $p$ goes to infinity. We prove a density theorem for the number of exceptional eigenvalues of random Cayley graphs i.e. the eigenvalues with absolute value bigger than the optimal spectral bound. Our numerical results suggest that random Cayley graphs of ${\rm SL}_2[\mathbb{Z}/p\mathbb{Z}]$ and the explicit LPS Ramanujan projective graphs of $\mathbb{P}^1(\mathbb{Z}/p\mathbb{Z})$ have optimal spectral gap and diameter as the prime number $p$ goes to infinity.
  • We study random knots, which we define as a triple of random periodic functions (where a random function is a random trigonometric series, \[f(\theta) = \sum_{k=1}^\infty a_k \cos (k \theta) +b_k (\sin k \theta),\] with $a_k, b_k$ are independent gaussian random variables with mean $0$ and variance $\sigma(k)^2$ - our results will depend on the functional dependence of $\sigma$ on $k.$ In particular, we show that if $\sigma(k) = k^\alpha,$ with $\alpha < -3/2,$ then the probability of getting a knot type which admits a projection with $N$ crossings, decays at least as fast as $1/N.$ The constant $3/2$ is significant, because having $\alpha < -3/2$ is exactly the condition for $f(\theta)$ to be a $C^1$ function, so our class is precisely the class of random \emph{tame} knots. We also find some suprising experimental observations on the zeros of Alexander polynomials of random knots (with slowly and non-decaying coefficients), and even more surprising observations on their coefficients. Our observations persist in other models of random knots, making it likely that the results are universal.
  • We show that the Galois group of a random monic polynomial %of degree $d>12$ with integer coefficients between $-N$ and $N$ is NOT $S_d$ with probability $\ll \frac{\log^{\Omega(d)}N}{N}.$ Conditionally on NOTbeing the full symmetric group, we have a hierarchy of possibilities each of which has polylog probability of occurring. These results also apply to random polynomials with only a subset of the coefficients allowed to vary. This settles a question going back to 1936.
  • We describe some studies related to the frequency of prime values of integer polynomials.
  • We show that for any $n\geq 2$, two elements selected uniformly at random from a \emph{symmetrized} Euclidean ball of radius $X$ in $\textrm{SL}_n(\mathbb Z)$ will generate a thin free group with probability tending to $1$ as $X\rightarrow \infty.$ This is done by showing that the two elements will form a ping-pong pair, when acting on a suitable space, with probability tending to $1$. On the other hand, we give an upper bound less than $1$ for the probability that two such elements will form a ping-pong pair in the usual Euclidean ball model in the case where $n>2$.
  • We give a different perspective on the (by now) classic Basmajian identity, and point out some related results, both in the setting of hyperbolic manifolds, and in the polyhedral setting \emph{without} any group acting. In the new version we give more geometric and combinatorial applications of the main ideas.
  • We introduce the first provably efficient algorithm to check if a finitely generated subgroup of an almost simple semi-simple group over the rationals is Zariski-dense. We reduce this question to one of computing Galois groups, and to this end we describe efficient algorithms to check if the Galois group of a polynomial $p$ with integer coefficients is "generic" (which, for arbitrary polynomials of degree $n$ means the full symmetric group $S_n,$ while for reciprocal polynomials of degree $2n$ it means the hyperoctahedral group $C_2 \wr S_n.$). We give efficient algorithms to verify that a polynomial has Galois group $S_n,$ and that a reciprocal polynomial has Galois group $C_2 \wr S_n.$ We show how these algorithms give efficient algorithms to check if a set of matrices $\mathcal{G}$ in $\mathop{SL}(n, \mathbb{Z})$ or $\mathop{Sp}(2n, \mathbb{Z})$ generate a \emph{Zariski dense} subgroup. The complexity of doing this in$\mathop{SL}(n, \mathbb{Z})$ is of order $O(n^4 \log n \log \|\mathcal{G}\|)\log \epsilon$ and in $\mathop{Sp}(2n, \mathbb{Z})$ the complexity is of order $O(n^8 \log n\log \|\mathcal{G}\|)\log \epsilon$ In general semisimple groups we show that Zariski density can be confirmed or denied in time of order $O(n^14 \log \|\mathcal{G}\|\log \epsilon),$ where $\epsilon$ is the probability of a wrong "NO" answer, while $\|\mathcal{G}\|$ is the measure of complexity of the input (the maximum of the Frobenius norms of the generating matrices). The algorithms work essentially without change over algebraic number fields, and in other semi-simple groups. However, we restrict to the case of the special linear and symplectic groups and rational coefficients in the interest of clarity.
  • We prove a conjecture dating back to a 1978 paper of D.R.\ Musser~\cite{musserirred}, namely that four random permutations in the symmetric group $\mathcal{S}_n$ generate a transitive subgroup with probability $p_n > \epsilon$ for some $\epsilon > 0$ independent of $n$, even when an adversary is allowed to conjugate each of the four by a possibly different element of $\S_n$ (in other words, the cycle types already guarantee generation of $\mathcal{S}_n$). This is closely related to the following random set model. A random set $M \subseteq \mathbb{Z}^+$ is generated by including each $n \geq 1$ independently with probability $1/n$. The sumset $\text{sumset}(M)$ is formed. Then at most four independent copies of $\text{sumset}(M)$ are needed before their mutual intersection is no longer infinite.
  • We describe extensive computational experiments on spectral properties of random objects - random cubic graphs, random planar triangulations, and Voronoi and Delaunay diagrams of random (uniformly distributed) point sets on the sphere). We look at bulk eigenvalue distribution, eigenvalue spacings, and locality properties of eigenvectors. We also look at the statistics of \emph{nodal domains} of eigenvectors on these graphs. In all cases we discover completely new (at least to this author) phenomena. The author has tried to refrain from making specific conjectures, inviting the reader, instead, to meditate on the data.
  • We study random elements of subgroups (and cosets) of the mapping class group of a closed hyperbolic surface, in part through the properties of their mapping tori. In particular, we study the distribution of the homology of the mapping torus (with rational, integer, and finite field coefficients, the hyperbolic volume (whenever the manifold is hyperbolic), the dilatation of the monodromy, the injectivity radius, and the bottom eigenvalue of the Laplacian on these mapping tori. We also study mapping tori of punctured surface bundles, and various invariants of their Dehn fillings. We also study corresponding questions in the Dunfield-Thurston model of random Heegard splittings of fixed genus, and give a number of new and improved results in that setting.
  • I describe some deep-seated problems in higher mathematical education, and give some ideas for their solution -- I advocate a move away from the traditional introduction of mathematics through calculus, and towards computation and discrete mathematics.
  • We discuss the question of how to pick a matrix uniformly (in an appropriate sense) at random from groups big and small. We give algorithms in some cases, and indicate interesting problems in others.
  • We give an exponential upper and a quadratic lower bound on the number of pairwise non-isotopic simple closed curves can be placed on a closed surface of genus g such that any two of the curves intersects at most once. Although the gap is large, both bounds are the best known for large genus. In genus one and two, we solve the problem exactly. Our methods generalize to variants in which the allowed number of pairwise intersections is odd, even, or bounded, and to surfaces with boundary components.
  • We give a survey of some known results and of the many open questions in the study of generic phenomena in geometrically interesting groups.
  • In this note we initiate the probabilistic study of the critical points of polynomials of large degree with a given distribution of roots. Namely, let f be a polynomial of degree n whose zeros are chosen IID from a probability measure mu on the complex numbers. We conjecture that the zero set of f' always converges in distribution to mu as n goes to infinity. We prove this for measures with finite one-dimensional energy. When mu is uniform on the unit circle this condition fails. In this special case the zero set of f' converges in distribution to that the IID Gaussian random power series, a well known determinantal point process.
  • Given a manifold M, it is natural to ask in how many ways it fibers (we mean fibering in a general way, where the base might be an orbifold -- this could be described as Seifert fibering)There are group-theoretic obstructions to the existence of even one fibering, and in some cases (such as Kahler manifolds or three-dimensional manifolds) the question reduces to a group-theoretic question. In this note we summarize the author's state of knowledge of the subject.
  • In this note we show that for any hyperbolic surface S, the number of geodesics of length bounded above by L in the mapping class group orbit of a fixed closed geodesic with a single double point is asymptotic to L raised to the dimension of the Teichmuller space of S. Since closed geodesics with one double point fall into a finite number of orbits under the mapping class group of S, we get the same asympotic estimate for the number of such geodesics of length bounded by L. We also use our (elementary) methods to do a more precise study of geodesics with a single double point on a punctured torus, including an extension of McShane's identity to such geodesics. In the second part of the paper we study the question of when a covering of the boundary of an oriented surface S can be extended to a covering of the surface S itself, we obtain a complete answer to that question, and also to the question of when we can further require the extension to be a \emph{regular} covering of S. We also analyze the question (first raised by K. Bou-Rabee) of the minimal index of a subgroup in a surface group which does not contain a given element. We give a (conjecturally) sharp result graded by the depth of an element in the lower central series, as well as "ungraded" results.
  • We start by studying the distribution of (cyclically reduced) elements of the free groups Fn with respect to their abelianization (or equivalently, their integer homology class. We derive an explicit generating function, and a limiting distribution, by means of certain results (of independent interest) on Chebyshev polynomials; we also prove that the reductions modulo an arbitrary prime of these classes are asymptotically equidistributed, and we study the deviation from equidistribution. We extend our techniques to a more general setting and use them to study the statistical properties of long cycles (and paths) on regular (directed and undirected) graphs. We return to the free group to study some growth functions of the number of conjugacy classes as a function of their cyclically reduced length.
  • We give a very short proof of the Golden-Thompson inequality
  • We address the question of when a covering of the boundary of a surface can be extended to a covering of the surface (equivalently: when is there a branched cover with a prescribed monodromy). If such an extension is possible, when can the total space be taken to be connected? When can the extension be taken to be regular? We give necessary and sufficient conditions for both finite and infinite covers (infinite covers are our main focus). In order to prove our results, we show group-theoretic results of independent interests, such as the following extension (and simplification) of the theorem of Ore}: every element of the infinite symmetric group is the commutator of two elements which, together, act transitively
  • In this note we show that the n-2-dimensional volumes of codimension 2 faces of an n-dimensional simplex are algebraically independent quantities of the volumes of its edge-lengths. The proof involves computation of the eigenvalues of Kneser graphs. We also construct families of non-congurent simplices not determined by their codimension-2 areas.
  • In this note we show the n-2-dimensional volumes of codimension 2 faces of an n-dimensional simplex are algebraically independent functions of the lengths of edges. In order to prove this we compute the complete spectrum of a combinatorially interesting graph.