• We address small volume-fraction asymptotic properties of a nonlocal isoperimetric functional with a confinement term, derived as the sharp interface limit of a variational model for self-assembly of diblock copolymers under confinement by nanoparticle inclusion. We introduce a small parameter $\eta$ to represent the size of the domains of the minority phase, and study the resulting droplet regime as $\eta\to 0$. By considering confinement densities which are spatially variable and attain a nondegenerate maximum, we present a two-stage asymptotic analysis wherein a separation of length scales is captured due to competition between the nonlocal repulsive and confining attractive effects in the energy. A key role is played by a parameter $M$ which gives the total volume of the droplets at order $\eta^3$ and its relation to existence and non-existence of Gamow's Liquid Drop model on $\mathbb{R}^3$. For large values of $M$, the minority phase splits into several droplets at an intermediate scale $\eta^{1/3}$, while for small $M$ minimizers form a single droplet converging to the maximum of the confinement density.
  • We consider an aggregation model with nonlinear diffusion in domains with boundaries and investigate the zero diffusion limit of its solutions. We establish the convergence of weak solutions for fixed times, as well as the convergence of energy minimizers in this limit. Numerical simulations that support the analytical results are presented. A second key scope of the numerical studies is to demonstrate that adding small nonlinear diffusion rectifies a flaw of the plain aggregation model in domains with boundaries, which is to evolve into unstable equilibria (non-minimizers of the energy).
  • We consider a variant of Gamow's liquid drop model, with a general repulsive Riesz kernel and a long-range attractive background potential with weight $Z$. The addition of the background potential acts as a regularization for the liquid drop model in that it restores the existence of minimizers for arbitrary mass. We consider the regime of small $Z$ and characterize the structure of minimizers in the limit $Z\to 0$ by means of a sharp asymptotic expansion of the energy. In the process of studying this limit we characterize all minimizing sequences for the Gamow model in terms of "generalized minimizers".
  • We prove that both the liquid drop model in $\mathbb{R}^3$ with an attractive background nucleus and the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-von Weizs\"{a}cker (TFDW) model attain their ground-states \emph{for all} masses as long as the external potential $V(x)$ in these models is of long range, that is, it decays slower than Newtonian (e.g., $V(x)\gg |x|^{-1}$ for large $|x|$.) For the TFDW model we adapt classical concentration-compactness arguments by Lions, whereas for the liquid drop model with background attraction we utilize a recent compactness result for sets of finite perimeter by Frank and Lieb.
  • We consider a class of nonlocal shape optimization problems for sets of fixed mass where the energy functional is given by an attractive/repulsive interaction potential in power-law form. We find that the existence of minimizers of this shape optimization problem depends crucially on the value of the mass. Our results include existence theorems for large mass and nonexistence theorems for small mass in the class where the attractive part of the potential is quadratic. In particular, for the case where the repulsion is given by the Newtonian potential, we prove that there is a critical value for the mass, above which balls are the unique minimizers, and below which minimizers fail to exist. The proofs rely on a relaxation of the variational problem to bounded densities, and recent progress on nonlocal obstacle problems.
  • We identify the $\Gamma$-limit of a nanoparticle-polymer model as the number of particles goes to infinity and as the size of the particles and the phase transition thickness of the polymer phases approach zero. The limiting energy consists of two terms: the perimeter of the interface separating the phases and a penalization term related to the density distribution of the infinitely many small nanoparticles. We prove that local minimizers of the limiting energy admit regular phase boundaries and derive necessary conditions of local minimality via the first variation. Finally we discuss possible critical and minimizing patterns in two dimensions and how these patterns vary from global minimizers of the purely local isoperimetric problem.
  • Inspired by numerical studies of the aggregation equation, we study the effect of regularization on nonlocal interaction energies. We consider energies defined via a repulsive-attractive interaction kernel, regularized by convolution with a mollifier. We prove that, with respect to the 2-Wasserstein metric, the regularized energies $\Gamma$-converge to the unregularized energy and minimizers converge to minimizers. We then apply our results to prove $\Gamma$-convergence of the gradient flows, when restricted to the space of measures with bounded density.
  • We investigate which nonlocal-interaction energies have a ground state (global minimizer). We consider this question over the space of probability measures and establish a sharp condition for the existence of ground states. We show that this condition is closely related to the notion of stability (i.e. $H$-stability) of pairwise interaction potentials. Our approach uses the direct method of the calculus of variations.
  • On the two dimensional sphere, we consider axisymmetric critical points of an isoperimetric problem perturbed by a long-range interaction term. When the parameter controlling the nonlocal term is sufficiently large, we prove the existence of a local minimizer with arbitrary many interfaces in the axisymmetric class of admissible functions. These local minimizers in this restricted class are shown to be critical points in the broader sense (i.e., with respect to all perturbations). We then explore the rigidity, due to curvature effects, in the criticality condition via several quantitative results regarding the axisymmetric critical points.