• We combine Gaia DR1, PS1, SDSS and 2MASS astrometry to measure proper motions for 350 million sources across three-fourths of the sky down to a magnitude of $m_r\sim20$\,. Using positions of galaxies from PS1, we build a common reference frame for the multi-epoch PS1, single-epoch SDSS and 2MASS data, and calibrate the data in small angular patches to this frame. As the Gaia DR1 excludes resolved galaxy images, we choose a different approach to calibrate its positions to this reference frame: we exploit the fact that the proper motions of stars in these patches are {\it linear}. By simultaneously fitting the positions of stars at different epochs of -- Gaia DR1, PS1, SDSS, and 2MASS -- we construct an extensive catalog of proper motions dubbed GPS1. GPS1 has a characteristic systematic error of less than 0.3 \masyr\, and a typical precision of $ 1.5-2.0$\masyr. The proper motions have been validated using galaxies, open clusters, distant giant stars and QSOs. In comparison with other published faint proper motion catalogs, GPS1's systematic error ($<0.3$ \masyr) should be nearly an order of magnitude better than that of PPMXL and UCAC4 ($>2.0$ \masyr). Similarly, its precision ($\sim 1.5$ \masyr) is a four-fold improvement relative to PPMXL and UCAC4 ($\sim 6.0$ \masyr). For QSOs, the precision of GPS1 is found to be worse ($\sim 2.0-3.0$\masyr), possibly due to their particular differential chromatic refraction (DCR). The GPS1 catalog will be released on-line and available via the VizieR Service and VO Service. (===GPS1 is available with VO TAP Query now, see http://www2.mpia-hd.mpg.de/~tian/GPS1/ for details=== )
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • In an optical color-magnitude diagram sub-subgiants (SSGs) lie red of the main sequence and fainter than the base of the red giant branch in a region not easily populated by standard stellar-evolution pathways. In this paper, we present multi-epoch radial velocities for five SSG candidates in the old and metal-rich open cluster NGC 6791 (8 Gyr, [Fe/H] = +0.30). From these data we are able to make three-dimensional kinematic membership determinations and confirm four SSG candidates to be likely cluster members. We also identify three member SSGs as short-period binary systems and present their orbital solutions. These are the first SSGs with known three-dimensional kinematic membership, binary status, and orbital parameters since the two SSGs in M67 studied by Mathieu et al. 2003. We also remark on the other properties of these stars including photometric variability, H$\alpha$ emission, and X-ray luminosity. The membership confirmation of these SSGs in NGC 6791 strengthens the case that SSGs are a new class of nonstandard stellar evolution products, and that a physical mechanism must be found that explains the evolutionary paths of these stars.
  • As part of our study of the old (~2.5 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819 in the Kepler field, we present photometric (Kepler and ground-based BVRcIc) and spectroscopic observations of the detached eclipsing binary WOCS 24009 (Auner 665; KIC 5023948) with a short orbital period of 3.6 days. WOCS 24009 is a triple-lined system, and we verify that the brightest star is physically orbiting the eclipsing binary using radial velocities and eclipse timing variations. The eclipsing binary components have masses M_B =1.090+/-0.010 Msun and M_C =1.075+/-0.013 Msun, and radii R_B =1.095+/-0.007 Rsun and R_C =1.057+/-0.008 Rsun. The bright non-eclipsing star resides at the cluster turnoff, and ultimately its mass will directly constrain the turnoff mass: our preliminary determination is M_A =1.251+/-0.057 Msun. A careful examination of the light curves indicates that the fainter star in the eclipsing binary undergoes a very brief period of total eclipse, which enables us to precisely decompose the light of the three stars and place them in the color-magnitude diagram. We also present improved analysis of two previously discussed detached eclipsing stars in NGC 6819 (WOCS 40007 and WOCS 23009) en route to a combined determination of the cluster's distance modulus (m-M)_V=12.38+/-0.04. Because this paper significantly increases the number of measured stars in the cluster, we can better constrain the age of the color-magnitude diagram to be 2.21+/-0.10+/-0.20 Gyr. Additionally, using all measured eclipsing binary star masses and radii, we constrain the age to 2.38+/-0.05+/-0.22 Gyr. The quoted uncertainties are estimates of measurement and systematic uncertainties (due to model physics differences and metal content), respectively.
  • The ages of the most common stars - low-mass (cool) stars like the Sun, and smaller - are difficult to derive because traditional dating methods use stellar properties that either change little as the stars age or are hard to measure. The rotation rates of all cool stars decrease substantially with time as the stars steadily lose their angular momenta. If properly calibrated, rotation therefore can act as a reliable determinant of their ages based on the method of gyrochronology. To calibrate gyrochronology, the relationship between rotation period and age must be determined for cool stars of different masses, which is best accomplished with rotation period measurements for stars in clusters with well-known ages. Hitherto, such measurements have been possible only in clusters with ages of less than about one billion years, and gyrochronology ages for older stars have been inferred from model predictions. Here we report rotation period measurements for 30 cool stars in the 2.5-billion-year-old cluster NGC 6819. The periods reveal a well-defined relationship between rotation period and stellar mass at the cluster age, suggesting that ages with a precision of order 10 per cent can be derived for large numbers of cool Galactic field stars.
  • The open cluster NGC 6791 has been the focus of much recent study due to its intriguing combination of old age and high metallicity ($\sim$8 Gyr, [Fe$/$H]=$+$0.30), as well as its location within the Kepler field. As part of the WIYN Open Cluster Study, we present precise ($\sigma=0.38$ km s$^{-1}$) radial velocities for proper-motion candidate members of NGC 6791 from Platais et al. Our survey, extending down to $g^\prime\sim16.8$, is comprised of the evolved cluster population, including blue stragglers, giants, and horizontal branch stars. Of the 280 proper-motion-selected stars above our magnitude limit, 93% have at least one radial-velocity measurement and 79% have three measurements over the course of at least 200 days, sufficient for secure radial-velocity-determined membership of non-velocity-variable stars. The Platais et al. proper-motion catalog includes twelve anomalous horizontal branch candidates blueward of the red clump, of which we find only four to be cluster members. Three fall slightly blueward of the red clump and the fourth is consistent with being a blue straggler. The cleaned color-magnitude diagram shows a richly populated red giant branch and a blue straggler population. Half of the blue stragglers are in binaries. From our radial-velocity measurement distribution we find the cluster's radial-velocity dispersion to be $\sigma_c=0.62\pm0.10$ km s$^{-1}$. This corresponds to a dynamical mass of $\sim$4600 $M_\odot$.
  • We present the current state of the WOCS radial-velocity (RV) survey for the rich open cluster NGC 6819 (2.5 Gyr) including 93 spectroscopic binary orbits with periods ranging from 1.5 to 8,000 days. These results are the product of our ongoing RV survey of NGC 6819 using the Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. We also include a detailed analysis of multiple prior sets of optical photometry for NGC 6819. Within a 1-degree field of view, our stellar sample includes the giant branch, the red clump, and blue straggler candidates, and extends to almost 2 mag below the main-sequence (MS) turnoff. For each star observed in our survey we present all RV measurements, the average RV and velocity variability information. Additionally, we discuss notable binaries from our sample, including eclipsing binaries (WOCS 23009, WOCS 24009, and WOCS 40007), stars noted in Kepler asteroseismology studies (WOCS 4008, WOCS 7009, and WOCS 8007), and potential descendants of past blue stragglers (WOCS 1006 and WOCS 6002). We find the incompleteness-corrected binary fraction for all MS binaries with periods less than 10,000 days to be 22% +/- 3% and a tidal circularization period of 6.2 +/- 1.1 days for NGC 6819.
  • We present the fiducial sequences of a sample of Galactic star clusters in the five bands of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) photometric system (g_P1, r_P1, i_P1, z_P1, y_P1). These empirical sequences -- which include the red giant and sub-giant branches, the main sequence, and the horizontal branch -- were defined from deep colour-magnitude diagrams reaching below the oldest main-sequence turn-offs of 13 globular and 3 old open clusters covering a wide range of metallicities (-2.4 < [Fe/H] < +0.4). We find excellent agreement for the nine clusters in common with previous studies in similar photometric systems when transformed to the PS1 system. Because the photometric and spectroscopic properties of these stellar populations are accurately known, the fiducials provide a solid basis for the interpretation of observations in the PS1 system, as well as valuable constraints to improve the empirical colour--$T_{eff}$ relations.
  • The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has proven to be uniquely suited for the measurement of proper motions (PMs) of stars and galaxies in the nearby Universe. Here we summarize the main results and ongoing studies of the HSTPROMO collaboration, which over the past decade has executed some two dozen observational and theoretical HST projects on this topic. This is continuing to revolutionize our dynamical understanding of many objects, including: globular clusters; young star clusters; stars and stellar streams in the Milky Way halo; Local Group galaxies, including dwarf satellite galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds, and the Andromeda galaxy; and AGN Black Hole Jets.
  • We analyze extensive BVR_cI_c time-series photometry and radial-velocity measurements for WOCS 40007 (Auner 259; KIC 5113053), a double-lined detached eclipsing binary and a member of the open cluster NGC 6819. Utilizing photometric observations from the 1-meter telescope at Mount Laguna Observatory and spectra from the WIYN 3.5-meter telescope, we measure precise and accurate masses (~1.6% uncertainty) and radii (~0.5%) for the binary components. In addition, we discover a third star orbiting the binary with a period greater than 3000 days using radial velocities and Kepler eclipse timings. Because the stars in the eclipsing binary are near the cluster turnoff, they are evolving rapidly in size and are sensitive to age. With a metallicity of [Fe/H]=+0.09+/-0.03, we find the age of NGC 6819 to be about 2.4 Gyr from CMD isochrone fitting and 3.1+/-0.4 Gyr by analyzing the mass-radius (M-R) data for this binary. The M-R age is above previous determinations for this cluster, but consistent within 1 sigma uncertainties. When the M-R data for the primary star of the additional cluster binary WOCS 23009 is included, the weighted age estimate drops to 2.5+/-0.2 Gyr, with a systematic uncertainty of at least 0.2 Gyr. The age difference between our CMD and M-R findings may be the result of systematic error in the metallicity or helium abundance used in models, or due to slight radius inflation of one or both stars in the WOCS 40007 binary.
  • Based on new observations with the Wide Field Camera 3 onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we report the discovery of an extended main sequence turn-off (eMSTO) in the intermediate-age star cluster NGC411. This is the second case of an eMSTO being identified in a star cluster belonging to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), after NGC419. Despite the present masses of these two SMC clusters differ by a factor of 4, the comparison between their colour--magnitude diagrams (CMD) shows striking similarities, especially regarding the shape of their eMSTOs. The loci of main CMD features are so similar that they can be well described, in a first approximation, by the same mean metallicity, distance and extinction. NGC411, however, presents merely a trace of secondary red clump as opposed to its prominent manifestation in NGC419. This could be due either to the small number statistics in NGC411, or by the star formation in NGC419 having continued for 60 Myr longer than in NGC411. Under the assumption that the eMSTOs are caused by different generations of stars at increasing age, both clusters are nearly coeval in their first episodes of star formation. The initial period of star formation, however, is slightly more marked in NGC419 than in NGC411. We discuss these findings in the context of possible scenarios for the origin of eMSTOs.
  • We present the discovery of the totally eclipsing long-period (P = 771.8 d) binary system WOCS 23009 in the old open cluster NGC 6819 that contains both an evolved star near central hydrogen exhaustion and a low-mass (0.45 Msun) star. This system was previously known to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary, but the discovery of an eclipse near apastron using data from the Kepler space telescope makes it clear that the system has an inclination that is very close to 90 degrees. Although the secondary star has not been identified in spectra, the mass of the primary star can be constrained using other eclipsing binaries in the cluster. The combination of total eclipses and a mass constraint for the primary star allows us to determine a reliable mass for the secondary star and radii for both stars, and to constrain the cluster age. Unlike well-measured stars of similar mass in field binaries, the low-mass secondary is not significantly inflated in radius compared to model predictions. The primary star characteristics, in combination with cluster photometry and masses from other cluster binaries, indicates a best age of 2.62+/-0.25 Gyr, although stellar model physics may introduce systematic uncertainties at the ~10% level. We find preliminary evidence that the asteroseismic predictions for red giant masses in this cluster are systematically too high by as much as 8%.
  • Absolute proper motions are determined for stars and galaxies to V=17.5 over a 450 square-degree area that encloses both Magellanic Clouds. The proper motions are based on photographic and CCD observations of the Yale/San Juan Southern Proper Motion program, which span over a baseline of 40 years. Multiple, local relative proper motion measures are combined in an overlap solution using photometrically selected Galactic Disk stars to define a global relative system that is then transformed to absolute using external galaxies and Hipparcos stars to tie into the ICRS. The resulting catalog of 1.4 million objects is used to derive the mean absolute proper motions of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Small Magellanic Cloud; $(\mu_\alpha\cos\delta,\mu_\delta)_{LMC}=(1.89,+0.39)\pm (0.27,0.27)\;\;\{mas yr}^{-1}$ and $(\mu_\alpha\cos\delta,\mu_\delta)_{SMC}=(0.98,-1.01)\pm (0.30,0.29)\;\;\{mas yr}^{-1}$. These mean motions are based on best-measured samples of 3822 LMC stars and 964 SMC stars. A dominant portion (0.25 mas yr$^{-1}$) of the formal errors is due to the estimated uncertainty in the inertial system of the Hipparcos Catalog stars used to anchor the bright end of our proper motion measures. A more precise determination can be made for the proper motion of the SMC {\it relative} to the LMC; $(\mu_{\alpha\cos\delta},\mu_\delta)_{SMC-LMC} = (-0.91,-1.49) \pm (0.16,0.15)\;\;\{mas yr}^{-1}$. This differential value is combined with measurements of the proper motion of the LMC taken from the literature to produce new absolute proper-motion determinations for the SMC, as well as an estimate of the total velocity difference of the two clouds to within $\pm$54 kms$^{-1}$.
  • Employing photometric rotation periods for solar-type stars in NGC 1039 [M 34], a young, nearby open cluster, we use its mass-dependent rotation period distribution to derive the cluster's age in a distance independent way, i.e., the so-called gyrochronology method. We present an analysis of 55 new rotation periods,using light curves derived from differential photometry, for solar type stars in M 34. We also exploit the results of a recently-completed, standardized, homogeneous BVIc CCD survey of the cluster in order to establish photometric cluster membership and assign B-V colours to each photometric variable. We describe a methodology for establishing the gyrochronology age for an ensemble of solar-type stars. Empirical relations between rotation period, photometric colour and stellar age (gyrochronology) are used to determine the age of M 34. Based on its position in a colour-period diagram, each M 34 member is designated as being either a solid-body rotator (interface or I-star), a differentially rotating star (convective or C-star) or an object which is in some transitory state in between the two (gap or g-star). Fitting the period and photometric colour of each I-sequence star in the cluster, we derive the cluster's mean gyrochronology age. 47/55 of the photometric variables lie along the loci of the cluster main sequence in V/B-V and V/V-I space. We are further able to confirm kinematic membership of the cluster for half of the periodic variables [21/55], employing results from an on-going radial velocity survey of the cluster. For each cluster member identified as an I-sequence object in the colour-period diagram, we derive its individual gyrochronology age, where the mean gyro age of M 34 is found to be 193 +/- 9 Myr, formally consistent (within the errors) with that derived using several distance-dependent, photometric isochrone methods (250 +/- 67 Myr).
  • We present results from a WIYN/OPTIC photometric and astrometric survey of the field of the open cluster NGC 188 ((l,b) = (122.8\arcdeg, 22.5\arcdeg)). We combine these results with the proper-motion and photometry catalog of Platais et al. and demonstrate the existence of a stellar overdensity in the background of NGC 188. The theoretical isochrone fits to the color-magnitude diagram of the overdensity are consistent with an age between 6 and 10 Gyr and an intermediately metal poor population ([Fe/H] = -0.5 to -1.0). The distance to the overdensity is estimated to be between 10.0 and 12.6 kpc. The proper-motions indicate that the stellar population of the overdensity is kinematically cold. The distance estimate and the absolute proper motion of the overdensity agree reasonably well with the predictions of the Pe\~{n}arrubia et al. model of the formation of the Monoceros stream. Orbits for this material constructed with plausible radial-velocity values, indicate that dynamically, this material is unlikely to belong to the thick disk. Taken together, this evidence suggests that the newly-found overdensity is part of the Monoceros stream.
  • We present 5201 radial-velocity measurements of 1144 stars, as part of an ongoing study of the young (150 Myr) open cluster M35 (NGC 2168). We have observed M35 since 1997, using the Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our stellar sample covers main-sequence stars over a magnitude range of 13.0<V<16.5 (1.6 - 0.8 Msun) and extends spatially to a radius of 30 arcminutes (7 pc in projection at a distance of 805 pc or 4 core radii). Due to its youth, M35 provides a sample of late-type stars with a range of rotation periods. Therefore, we analyze the radial-velocity measurement precision as a function of the projected rotational velocity. For narrow-lined stars (v sin i < 10 km/s), the radial velocities have a precision of 0.5 km/s, which degrades to 1.0 km/s for stars with v sin i = 50 km/s. The radial-velocity distribution shows a well-defined cluster peak with a central velocity of -8.16 +/- 0.05 km/s, permitting a clean separation of the cluster and field stars. For stars with >=3 measurements, we derive radial-velocity membership probabilities and identify radial-velocity variables, finding 360 cluster members, 55 of which show significant radial- velocity variability. Using these cluster members, we construct a color-magnitude diagram for our stellar sample cleaned of field star contamination. We also compare the spatial distribution of the single and binary cluster members, finding no evidence for mass segregation in our stellar sample. Accounting for measurement precision, we place an upper limit on the radial-velocity dispersion of the cluster of 0.81 +/- 0.08 km/s. After correcting for undetected binaries, we derive a true radial-velocity dispersion of 0.65 +/- 0.10 km/s.
  • We present the current results from our ongoing radial-velocity survey of the intermediate-age (2.4 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819. Using both newly observed and other available photometry and astrometry we define a primary target sample of 1454 stars that includes main-sequence, subgiant, giant, and blue straggler stars, spanning a magnitude range of 11<=V<=16.5 and an approximate mass range of 1.1 to 1.6 Msun. Our sample covers a 23 arcminute (13 pc) square field of view centered on the cluster. We have measured 6571 radial velocities for an unbiased sample of 1207 stars in the direction of the open cluster NGC 6819, with a single-measurement precision of 0.4 km/s for most narrow-lined stars. We use our radial-velocity data to calculate membership probabilities for stars with >= 3 measurements, providing the first comprehensive membership study of the cluster core that includes stars from the giant branch through the upper main sequence. We identify 480 cluster members. Additionally, we identify velocity-variable systems, all of which are likely hard binaries that dynamically power the cluster. Using our single cluster members, we find a cluster average radial velocity of 2.34 +/- 0.05 km/s . We use our kinematic cluster members to construct a cleaned color- magnitude diagram from which we identify rich giant, subgiant, and blue straggler populations and a well-defined red clump. The cluster displays a morphology near the cluster turnoff clearly indicative of core convective overshoot. Finally, we discuss a few stars of note, one of which is a short-period red-clump binary that we suggest may be the product of a dynamical encounter.
  • The predictions from a Galactic Structure and Kinematic model code are compared to the color counts and absolute proper-motions derived from the Southern Proper-Motion survey covering more than 700 $\deg^2$ toward the South Galactic Pole in the range $9 < B_{\rm J} \le 19$. The theoretical assumptions and associated computational procedures, the geometry for the kinematic model, and the adopted parameters are presented in detail and compared to other Galactic Kinematic models of its kind. The data to which the model is compared consists of more than 30,000 randomly selected stars, and it is best fit by models with a solar peculiar motion of +5 km s$^{-1}$ in the V-component (pointing in the direction of Galactic rotation), a large LSR speed of 270 km s$^{-1}$, and a (disk) velocity ellipsoid that always points towards the Galactic center. The absolute proper-motions in the U-component indicate a solar peculiar motion of $11.0 \pm 1.5$ km s$^{-1}$, with no need for a local expansion or contraction term. The fainter absolute motions show an indication that the thick-disk must exhibit a rather steep velocity gradient of about -36 km s$^{-1}$ kpc$^{-1}$ with respect to the LSR. We are not able to set constraints on the overall rotation for the halo, nor on the thick-disk or halo velocity dispersions. Some substructure in the U & V proper-motions could be present in the brighter bins $10 < B_{\rm J} < 13$, and it might be indicative of (disk) moving groups.
  • Predictions from a Galactic Structure and Kinematic model are compared to the absolute proper-motions of about 30,000 randomly selected stars with $9 < B_{\rm J} \le 19$ derived from the Southern Proper-Motion Program (SPM) toward the South Galactic Pole. The absolute nature of the SPM proper-motions allow us to measure not only the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the local disk, but also, and most importantly, the overall state of rotation of the local disk with respect to galaxies. The SPM data are best fit by models having a solar peculiar motion of +5 km~s$^{-1}$ in the V-component (pointing in the direction of Galactic rotation), a large LSR speed of 270 km~s$^{-1}$, and a disk velocity ellipsoid that points towards the Galactic center. We stress, however, that these results rest crucially on the assumptions of both axisymmetry and equilibrium dynamics. The absolute proper-motions in the U-component indicate a solar peculiar motion of $11.0 \pm 1.5$ km~s$^{-1}$, with no need for a local expansion or contraction term. The implications of the large LSR speed are discussed in terms of gravitational mass of the Galaxy inferred from the most recent and accurate determination for the proper-motion of the LMC. We find that our derived value for the LSR is consistent both with the mass of the Galaxy inferred from the motion of the Clouds ($3 - 4 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$ to $\sim 50$ kpc), as well as the timing argument, based on the binary motion of M31 and the Milky Way, and Leo I and the Milky Way ($\ge 1.2 \times 10^{12} M_\odot$ to $\sim 200$ kpc).