• We demonstrate an experimental technique for both transverse and longitudinal characterization of bunched femtosecond free electron beams. The operation principle is based on monitoring of the current of electrons that obtained an energy gain during the interaction with the synchronized optical near-field wave excited by femtosecond laser pulses. The synchronous accelerating/decelerating fields confined to the surface of a silicon nanostructure are characterized using a highly focused sub-relativistic electron beam. Here the transverse spatial resolution of 450 nm and femtosecond temporal resolution achievable by this technique are demonstrated.
  • We present a comprehensive study of laser pulse amplification with respect to operation regimes, gain dynamics, and highly stable operation points of Ho:YLF regenerative amplifiers (RAs). The findings are expected to be more generic than for this specific case. Operation regimes are distinguished with respect to pulse energy and the appearance of pulse instability, and are studied as a function of the repetition rate, seed energy, and pump intensity. The corresponding gain dynamics are presented, identifying highly stable operation points related to high gain build -up during pumping and high gain depletion during pulse amplification. These operation points are studied numerically and experimentally as a function of several parameters, thereby achieving, for our Ho:YLF RA, highly stable output pulses with measured fluctuations of only 0.19% (standard deviation).
  • The widespread use of high energy particle beams in basic research, medicine and coherent X-ray generation coupled with the large size of modern radio frequency (RF) accelerator devices and facilities has motivated a strong need for alternative accelerators operating in regimes outside of RF. Working at optical frequencies, dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) - transparent laser-driven nanoscale dielectric structures whose near fields can synchronously accelerate charged particles - have demonstrated high-gradient acceleration with a variety of laser wavelengths, materials, and electron beam parameters, potentially enabling miniaturized accelerators and table-top coherent x-ray sources. To realize a useful (i.e. scalable) DLA, crucial developments have remained: concatenation of components including sustained phase synchronicity to reach arbitrary final energies as well as deflection and focusing elements to keep the beam well collimated along the design axis. Here, all of these elements are demonstrated with a subrelativistic electron beam. In particular, by creating two interaction regions via illumination of a nanograting with two spatio-temporally separated pulsed laser beams, we demonstrate a phase-controlled doubling of electron energy gain from 0.7 to 1.4 keV (2.5 percent to 5 percent of the initial beam energy) and through use of a chirped grating geometry, we overcome the dephasing limit of 25 keV electrons, increasing their energy gains to a laser power limited 10 percent of their initial energy. Further, optically-driven transverse focusing of the electron beam with focal lengths below 200 microns is achieved via a parabolic grating geometry. These results lay the cornerstone for future miniaturized phase synchronous vacuum-structure-based accelerators.
  • In this paper we present proof of principle experiments of an optical gating concept for free electrons. We demonstrate a temporal resolution of 1.2+-0.3 fs via energy and transverse momentum modulation as a function of time. The scheme is based on the synchronous interaction between electrons and the near-field mode of a dielectric nano-grating excited by a femtosecond laser pulse with an optical period duration of 6.5 fs. The sub-optical cycle resolution demonstrated here is promising for use in laser-driven streak cameras for attosecond temporal characterization of bunched particle beams as well as time-resolved experiments with free-electron beams. We expect that 10 as temporal resolution will be achieved in the near future using such a scheme.
  • We demonstrate a Ho:YLF regenerative amplifier (RA) overcoming bifurcation instability and consequently achieving high extraction energies of 6.9 mJ at a repetition rate of 1 kHz with pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of 1.1%. Measurements of the output pulse energy, corroborated by numerical simulations, identify an operation point that allows high-energy pulse extraction at a minimum noise level. Complete suppression of the onset of bifurcation was achieved by gain saturation after each pumping cycle in the Ho:YLF crystal via lowering the repetition rate and cooling the crystal. Even for moderate cooling, a significant temperature dependence of the Ho:YLF RA performance was observed.
  • We present a passively mode-locked, tunable soliton Ho:fiber ring oscillator, optimized for seeding of Ho:YLF amplifiers. The oscillator is independently tunable in central wavelength and spectral width from 2040 nm to 2070 nm and from 5 nm to 10 nm, respectively. At all settings the pulse energy within the soliton is around 800 pJ. The soliton oscillator was optimized to fully meets the spectral requirements for seeding Ho:YLF amplifiers. Its Kelly sidebands are located outside the amplifier gain spectrum, resulting in a train of about 1 ps long pedestal-free pulses with relative intensity noise (RIN) of only 0.13 % RMS when integrated from 1 Hz to Nyquist frequency.
  • We report on a mid-infrared frequency comb source of unprecedented tunability covering the entire 3-10 {\mu}m molecular fingerprint region. The system is based on difference frequency generation in a GaSe crystal pumped by a 151 MHz Yb:fiber frequency comb. The process was seeded with Raman shifted solitons generated in a highly nonlinear suspended-core fiber with the same source. Average powers up to 1.5 mW were achieved at 4.7 {\mu}m wavelength.
  • Development of the optical frequency comb has revolutionised metrology and precision spectroscopy due to its ability to provide a precise and direct link between microwave and optical frequencies. A novel application of frequency comb technology that leverages both the ultrashort duration of each laser pulse and the exquisite phase coherence of a train of pulses is the generation of frequency combs in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) via high harmonic generation (HHG) in a femtosecond enhancement cavity. Until now, this method has lacked sufficient average power for applications, which has also hampered efforts to observe phase coherence of the high-repetition rate pulse train produced in the extremely nonlinear HHG process. Hence, the existence of a frequency comb in the XUV has not been confirmed. We have overcome both challenges. Here, we present generation of >200 {\mu}W per harmonic reaching 50 nm, and the observation of single-photon spectroscopy signals for both an argon transition at 82 nm and a neon transition at 63 nm. The absolute frequency of the argon transition has been determined via direct frequency comb spectroscopy. The resolved 10-MHz linewidth of the transition, limited by the transverse temperature of the argon atoms, is unprecedented in this spectral region and places a stringent upper limit on the linewidth of individual comb teeth. Due to the lack of cw lasers, these frequency combs are currently the only promising avenue towards extending ultrahigh precision spectroscopy to below the 100-nm spectral region with a wide range of applications that include spectroscopy of electronic transitions in molecules, experimental tests of bound state and many body quantum electrodynamics in He+ and He, development of next-generation "nuclear" clocks, and searches for spatial and temporal variation of fundamental constants using the enhanced sensitivity of highly charged ions.
  • We present detailed studies of the coherence properties of an ultra-broadband super-continuum, enabled by a new approach involving continuous wave laser sources to independently probe both the amplitude and phase noise quadratures across the entire spectrum. The continuum coherently spans more than 1.5 octaves, supporting Hz-level comparison of ultrastable lasers at 698 nm and 1.54 {\mu}m. We present the first numerical simulation of the accumulated comb coherence in the limit of many pulses, in contrast to the single-pulse level, with systematic experimental verification. The experiment and numerical simulations reveal the presence of quantum-seeded broadband amplitude noise without phase coherence degradation, including the discovery of a dependence of the super-continuum coherence on the fiber fractional Raman gain.
  • Optical frequency-comb-based-high-resolution spectrometers offer enormous potential for spectroscopic applications. Although various implementations have been demonstrated, the lack of suitable mid-infrared comb sources has impeded explorations of molecular fingerprinting. Here we present for the first time a frequency-comb Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the 2100-to-3700-cm-1 spectral region that allows fast and simultaneous acquisitions of broadband absorption spectra with up to 0.0056 cm-1 resolution. We demonstrate part-per-billion detection limits in 30 seconds of integration time for various important molecules including methane, ethane, isoprene, and nitrous oxide. Our system enables precise concentration measurements even in gas mixtures that exhibit continuous absorption bands, and it allows detection of molecules at levels below the noise floor via simultaneous analysis of multiple spectral features. This system represents a near real-time, high-resolution, high-bandwidth mid-infrared spectrometer which is ready to replace traditional Fourier transform spectrometers for many applications in trace gas detection, atmospheric science, and medical diagnostics.
  • We present a high-power optical parametric oscillator-based frequency comb in the mid-infrared wavelength region using periodically poled lithium niobate. The system is synchronously pumped by a 10-W femtosecond Yb:fiber laser centered at 1.07 um and is singly resonant for the signal. The idler (signal) wavelength can be continuously tuned from 2.8 to 4.8 um (1.76 to 1.37 um) with a simultaneous bandwidth as high as 0.3 um and a maximum average idler output power of 1.50 W. We also demonstrate the performance of the stabilized comb by recording the heterodyne beat with a narrow-linewidth diode laser. This OPO is an ideal source for frequency comb spectroscopy in the mid-IR.