• We present a survey of the extinction properties of ten lensing galaxies, in the redshift range z = 0.04 - 1.01, using multiply lensed quasars imaged with the ESO VLT in the optical and near infrared. The multiple images act as 'standard light sources' shining through different parts of the lensing galaxy, allowing for extinction studies by comparison of pairs of images. We explore the effects of systematics in the extinction curve analysis, including extinction along both lines of sight and microlensing, using theoretical analysis and simulations. In the sample, we see variation in both the amount and type of extinction. Of the ten systems, seven are consistent with extinction along at least one line of sight. The mean differential extinction for the most extinguished image pair for each lens is A(V) = 0.56 +- 0.04, using Galactic extinction law parametrization. The corresponding mean R_V = 2.8 +- 0.4 is consistent with that of the Milky Way at R_V = 3.1, where R_V = A(V)/E(B-V). We do not see any strong evidence for evolution of extinction properties with redshift. Of the ten systems, B1152+199 shows the strongest extinction signal of A(V) = 2.43 +- 0.09 and is consistent with a Galactic extinction law with R_V = 2.1 +- 0.1. Given the similar redshift distribution of SN Ia hosts and lensing galaxies, a large space based study of multiply imaged quasars would be a useful complement to future dark energy SN Ia surveys, providing independent constraints on the statistical extinction properties of galaxies up to z~1.
  • We present optical lightcurves of the gravitationally lensed components A (=A1+A2+A3) and B of the quadruple quasar RX J0911.4+0551 (z = 2.80). The observations were primarily obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope between 1997 March and 2001 April and consist of 74 I-band data points for each component. The data allow the measurement of a time delay of 146 +- 8 days (2 sigma) between A and B, with B as the leading component. This value is significantly shorter than that predicted from simple models and indicates a very large external shear. Mass models including the main lens galaxy and the surrounding massive cluster of galaxies at z = 0.77, responsible for the external shear, yield H_0 = 71 +- 4 (random, 2 sigma) +- 8 (systematic) km/s/Mpc. The systematic model uncertainty is governed by the surface-mass density (convergence) at the location of the multiple images.