• Molecular dynamics simulation studies were performed to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of liquid carbon disulfide from ambient to elevated pressure conditions. The results obtained have revealed structural changes at high pressures, which are related to the more dense packing of the molecules inside the first solvation shell. The calculated neutron and X-Ray structure factors have been compared with available experimental diffraction data, also revealing the pressure effects on the short-range structure of the liquid. The pressure effects on the translational, reorientational and residence dynamics are very strong, revealing a significant slowing down when going from ambient pressure to 1.2 GPa. The translational dynamics of the linear CS2 molecules have been found to be more anisotropic at elevated pressures, where cage effects and librational motions are reflected on the shape of the calculated time correlation functions and their corresponding spectral densities.
  • Rechargeable lithium ion batteries are an attractive alternative power source for a wide variety of applications. To optimize their performances, a complete description of the solvation properties of the ion in the electrolyte is crucial. A comprehensive understanding at the nanoscale of the solvation structure of lithium ions in nonaqueous carbonate electrolytes is, however, still unclear. We have measured by femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy the orientational correlation time of the CO stretching mode of Li+-bound and Li+-unbound ethylene carbonate molecules, in LiBF4, LiPF6, and LiClO4 ethylene carbonate solutions with different concentrations. Surprisingly, we have found that the coordination number of ethylene carbonate in the first solvation shell of Li+ is only two, in all solutions with concentrations higher than 0.5 M. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the presence of anions in the first coordination shell modifies the generally accepted tetrahedral structure of the complex, allowing only two EC molecules to coordinate to Li+ directly. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the anion influence on the overall structure of the first solvation shell of the Li+ ion. The formation of such a cation/solvent/anion complex provides a rational explanation for the ionic conductivity drop of lithium/carbonate electrolyte solutions at high concentrations.
  • Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum chemical density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been employed in the present study to investigate the solvation of lithium cations in pure organic carbonate solvents (ethylene carbonate (EC), propylene carbonate (PC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC)) and their binary (EC-DMC, 1:1 molar composition) and ternary (EC-DMC-PC, 1:1:3 molar composition) mixtures. The results obtained by both methods indicate that the formation of complexes with four solvent molecules around Li+, exhibiting a strong local tetrahedral order, is the most favorable. However, the molecular dynamics simulations have revealed the existence of significant structural heterogeneities, extending up to a length scale which is more than five times the size of the first coordination shell radius. Due to these significant structural fluctuations in the bulk liquid phases, the use of larger size clusters in DFT calculations has been suggested. Contrary to the findings of the DFT calculations on small isolated clusters, the MD simulations have predicted a preference of Li+ to interact with DMC molecules within its first solvation shell and not with the highly polar EC and PC ones, in the binary and ternary mixtures. This behavior has been attributed to the local tetrahedral packing of the solvent molecules in the first solvation shell of Li+, which causes a cancellation of the individual molecular dipole vectors, and this effect seems to be more important in the cases where molecules of the same type are present. Due to these cancellation effects, the total dipole in the first solvation shell of Li+ increases when the local mole fraction of DMC is high.