• We present photometry, spectroscopy, and host-galaxy integral-field spectroscopy of the Type II supernova (SN) 2016esw in CGCG~229-009 from the first day after the explosion up to 120 days. Its light-curve shape is similar to that of a typical SN II; however, SN 2016esw is near the high-luminosity end of the SN II distribution, with a peak of $M^{\rm max}_{V}=-18.36$ mag. The $V$-band light curve exhibits a long recombination phase for a SN II (similar to the long-lived plateau of SN 2004et). Considering the well-known relation between the luminosity and the plateau decline rate, SN 2016esw should have a $V$-band slope of $\sim 2.10$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$; however, SN 2016esw has a substantially flatter plateau with a slope of $1.01\pm 0.26$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$, perhaps indicating that interacting Type II supernovae are not useful for cosmology. At 19.5 days post-explosion, the spectrum presents a boxy H$\alpha$ emission line with flat absorption profiles, suggesting interaction between the ejecta and circumstellar matter. Finally, based on the spectral properties, SN 2016esw shows similarities with the luminous and interacting SN 2007pk at early epochs, particularly in terms of observable line features and their evolution.
  • The dominant mechanism and time scales over which stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) progenitor stars shed their hydrogen envelopes are uncertain. Observations of Type Ib and Ic SNe at late phases could reveal the optical signatures of interaction with distant circumstellar material (CSM) providing important clues on the origin of the necessary pre-SN mass loss. We report deep late-time optical spectroscopy of the Type Ib explosion SN 2004dk 4684 days (13 years) after discovery. Prominent intermediate-width H-alpha emission is detected, signaling that the SN blast wave has caught up with the hydrogen-rich CSM lost by the progenitor system. The line luminosity is the highest ever reported for a SN at this late stage. Prominent emission features of He, Fe, and Ca are also detected. The spectral characteristics are consistent with CSM energized by the forward shock, and resemble the late-time spectra of the persistently interacting Type IIn SNe 2005ip and 1988Z. We suggest that the onset of interaction with H-rich CSM was associated with a previously reported radio rebrightening at ~1700 days. The data indicate that the mode of pre-SN mass loss was a relatively slow dense wind that persisted millennia before the SN, followed by a short-lived Wolf-Rayet phase that preceded core-collapse and created a cavity within an extended distribution of CSM. We also present new spectra of SNe 2014C, PTF11iqb, and 2009ip, all of which also exhibit continued interaction with extended CSM distributions.
  • We present the results of an extensive observational campaign on the nearby Type Ibn SN 2015G, including data from radio through ultraviolet wavelengths. SN 2015G was asymmetric, showing late-time nebular lines redshifted by ~1000 km/s. It shared many features with the prototypical SN In 2006jc, including extremely strong He I emssion lines and a late-time blue pseudocontinuum. The young SN 2015G showed narrow P-Cygni profiles of He I, but never in its evolution did it show any signature of hydrogen - arguing for a dense, ionized, and hydrogen-free circumstellar medium moving outward with a velocity of ~1000 km/s and created by relatively recent mass loss from the progenitor star. Ultraviolet through infrared observations show that the fading SN 2015G (which was probably discovered some 20 days post-peak) had a spectral energy distribution that was well described by a simple, single-component blackbody. Archival HST images provide upper limits on the luminosity of SN 2015G's progenitor, while nondetections of any luminous radio afterglow and optical nondetections of outbursts over the past two decades provide constraints upon its mass-loss history.
  • A search for the progenitor of SN~2010jl, an unusually luminous core-collapse supernova of Type~IIn, using pre-explosion {\it Hubble}/WFPC2 and {\it Spitzer}/IRAC images of the region, yielded upper limits on the UV and near-infrared (IR) fluxes from any candidate star. These upper limits constrain the luminosity and effective temperature of the progenitor, the mass of any preexisting dust in its surrounding circumstellar medium (CSM), and dust proximity to the star. A {\it lower} limit on the CSM dust mass is required to hide a luminous progenitor from detection by {\it Hubble}. {\it Upper} limits on the CSM dust mass and constraints on its proximity to the star are set by requiring that the absorbed and reradiated IR emission not exceed the IRAC upper limits. Using the combined extinction-IR emission constraints we present viable $M_d-R_1$ combinations, where $M_d$ and $R_1$ are the CSM dust mass and its inner radius. These depend on the CSM outer radius, dust composition and grain size, and the properties of the progenitor. The results constrain the pre-supernova evolution of the progenitor, and the nature and origin of the observed post-explosion IR emission from SN~2010jl. In particular, an $\eta$~Car-type progenitor will require at least 4~mag of visual extinction to avoid detection by the {\it Hubble}. This can be achieved with dust masses $\gtrsim 10^{-3}$~\msun\ (less than the estimated 0.2-0.5~\msun\ around $\eta$~Car) which must be located at distances of $\gtrsim 10^{16}$~cm from the star to avoid detection by {\it Spitzer}.
  • Most types of supernovae (SNe) have yet to be connected with their progenitor stellar systems. Here, we reanalyze the 10-year SN sample collected during 1998-2008 by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to constrain the progenitors of SNe Ia and stripped-envelope SNe (SE SNe, i.e., SNe~IIb, Ib, Ic, and broad-lined Ic). We matched the LOSS galaxy sample with spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and measured SN rates as a function of galaxy stellar mass, specific star formation rate, and oxygen abundance (metallicity). We find significant correlations between the SN rates and all three galaxy properties. The SN Ia correlations are consistent with other measurements, as well as with our previous explanation of these measurements in the form of a combination of the SN Ia delay-time distribution and the correlation between galaxy mass and age. The ratio between the SE SN and SN II rates declines significantly in low-mass galaxies. This rules out single stars as SE~SN progenitors, and is consistent with predictions from binary-system progenitor models. Using well-known galaxy scaling relations, any correlation between the rates and one of the galaxy properties examined here can be expressed as a correlation with the other two. These redundant correlations preclude us from establishing causality - that is, from ascertaining which of the galaxy properties (or their combination) is the physical driver for the difference between the SE SN and SN II rates. We outline several methods that have the potential to overcome this problem in future works.
  • In Paper I of this series, we showed that the ratio between stripped-envelope (SE) supernova (SN) and Type II SN rates reveals a significant SE SN deficiency in galaxies with stellar masses $\lesssim 10^{10}~{\rm M}_\odot$. Here, we test this result by splitting the volume-limited subsample of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) SN sample into low- and high-mass galaxies and comparing the relative rates of various SN types found in them. The LOSS volume-limited sample contains 180 SNe and SN impostors and is complete for SNe Ia out to 80 Mpc and core-collapse SNe out to 60 Mpc. All of these transients were recently reclassified by us in Shivvers et al. (2017). We find that the relative rates of some types of SNe differ between low- and high-mass galaxies: SNe Ib and Ic are underrepresented by a factor of ~3 in low-mass galaxies. These galaxies also contain the only examples of SN 1987A-like SNe in the sample and host about 9 times as many SN impostors. Normal SNe Ia seem to be ~30\% more common in low-mass galaxies, making these galaxies better sources for homogeneous SN Ia cosmology samples. The relative rates of SNe IIb are consistent in both low- and high-mass galaxies. The same is true for broad-line SNe Ic, although our sample includes only two such objects. The results presented here are in tension with a similar analysis from the Palomar Transient Factory, especially as regards SNe IIb.
  • We re-examine the classifications of supernovae (SNe) presented in the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) volume-limited sample with a focus on the stripped-envelope SNe. The LOSS volume-limited sample, presented by Leaman et al. (2011) and Li et al. (2011b), was calibrated to provide meaningful measurements of SN rates in the local universe; the results presented therein continue to be used for comparisons to theoretical and modeling efforts. Many of the objects from the LOSS sample were originally classified based upon only a small subset of the data now available, however, and recent studies have both updated some subtype distinctions and improved our ability to perform robust classications, especially for stripped-envelope SNe. We re-examine the spectroscopic classifications of all events in the LOSS volume-limited sample (180 SNe and SN impostors) and update them if necessary. We discuss the populations of rare objects in our sample including broad-lined Type Ic SNe, Ca-rich SNe, SN 1987A-like events (we identify SN 2005io as SN 1987A-like here for the first time), and peculiar subtypes. The relative fractions of Type Ia SNe, Type II SNe, and stripped-envelope SNe in the local universe are not affected, but those of some subtypes are. Most significantly, after discussing the often unclear boundary between SNe Ib and Ic when only noisy spectra are available, we find a higher SN Ib fraction and a lower SN Ic fraction than calculated by Li et al. (2011b): spectroscopically normal SNe Ib occur in the local universe $1.7 \pm 0.9$ times more often than do normal SNe Ic.
  • SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days, and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ~800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on, and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstellar dust. We suggest that interaction with an equatorial distribution of CSM, perhaps the result of binary evolution, is responsible for generating the photospheric asphericity. Relatedly, our late-time optical imaging and spectroscopy shows that asymmetric CSM interaction is ongoing, and the morphology of broad H-alpha emission from shock-excited ejecta provides additional evidence that the geometry of the interaction region is ellipsoidal. Alternatively, a prolate ellipsoidal geometry from an intrinsically bipolar explosion is also a plausible interpretation of the data, but would probably require a ballistic jet of radioactive material capable of penetrating the hydrogen envelope early in the recombination phase (abridged).
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • The nature of the progenitor star (or system) for the Type IIn supernova (SN) subclass remains uncertain. While there are direct imaging constraints on the progenitors of at least four Type IIn supernovae, one of them being SN 2010jl, ambiguities remain in the interpretation of the unstable progenitors and the explosive events themselves. A blue source in pre-explosion HST/WFPC2 images falls within the 5 sigma astrometric error circle derived from post-explosion ground-based imaging of SN 2010jl. At the time the ground-based astrometry was published, however, the SN had not faded sufficiently for post-explosion HST follow-up observations to determine a more precise astrometric solution and/or confirm if the pre-explosion source had disappeared, both of which are necessary to ultimately disentangle the possible progenitor scenarios. Here we present HST/WFC3 imaging of the SN 2010jl field obtained in 2014 and 2015, when the SN had faded sufficiently to allow for new constraints on the progenitor. The SN, which is still detected in the new images, is offset by 0."099 +/- 0."008 (24 +/- 2 pc) from the underlying and extended source of emission that contributes at least partially, if not entirely, to the blue source previously suggested as the candidate progenitor in the WFPC2 data. This point alone rules out the possibility that the blue source in the pre-explosion images is the exploding star, but may instead suggest an association with a young (<5-6 Myr) cluster and still argues for a massive (>30 solar masses) progenitor. We obtain new upper limits on the flux from a single star at the SN position in the pre-explosion WFPC2 and Spitzer/IRAC images that may ultimately be used to constrain the progenitor properties.
  • Supernova (SN) 2015U (also known as PSN J07285387+3349106) was discovered in NGC 2388 on 2015 Feb. 11. A rapidly evolving and luminous event, it showed effectively hydrogen-free spectra dominated by relatively narrow helium P-Cygni spectral features and it was classified as a SN Ibn. In this paper we present photometric, spectroscopic, and spectropolarimetric observations of SN 2015U, including a Keck/DEIMOS spectrum (resolution $\approx$ 5000) which fully resolves the optical emission and absorption features. We find that SN 2015U is best understood via models of shock breakout from extended and dense circumstellar material (CSM), likely created by a history of mass loss from the progenitor with an extreme outburst within $\sim$1-2 yr of core collapse (but we do not detect any outburst in our archival imaging of NGC 2388). We argue that the high luminosity of SN 2015U was powered not through $^{56}$Ni decay but via the deposition of kinetic energy into the ejecta/CSM shock interface. Though our analysis is hampered by strong host-galaxy dust obscuration (which likely exhibits multiple components), our dataset makes SN 2015U one of the best-studied Type Ibn supernovae and provides a bridge of understanding to other rapidly fading transients, both luminous and relatively faint.
  • We present optical spectra of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe at 100, 205, 311, 349, and 578 days post-maximum light, as well as an ultraviolet spectrum obtained with Hubble Space Telescope at 360 days post-maximum light. We compare these observations with synthetic spectra produced with the radiative transfer code PHOENIX. The day +100 spectrum can be well fit with models which neglect collisional and radiative data for forbidden lines. Curiously, including this data and recomputing the fit yields a quite similar spectrum, but with different combinations of lines forming some of the stronger features. At day +205 and later epochs, forbidden lines dominate much of the optical spectrum formation; however, our results indicate that recombination, not collisional excitation, is the most influential physical process driving spectrum formation at these late times. Consequently, our synthetic optical and UV spectra at all epochs presented here are formed almost exclusively through recombination-driven fluorescence. Furthermore, our models suggest that the ultraviolet spectrum even as late as day +360 is optically thick and consists of permitted lines from several iron-peak species. These results indicate that the transition to the "nebular" phase in Type Ia supernovae is complex and highly wavelength-dependent.
  • We present the second multi-frequency radio detection of a reverse shock in a $\gamma$-ray burst. By combining our extensive radio observations of the Fermi-LAT GRB 160509A at $z = 1.17$ up to $20$ days after the burst with Swift X-ray observations and ground-based optical and near-infrared data, we show that the afterglow emission comprises distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions: the reverse shock emission dominates in the radio band at $\lesssim10~$days, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-ray, optical, and near-infrared bands. Through multi-wavelength modeling, we determine a circumburst density of $n_0\approx10^{-3}~$cm$^{-3}$, supporting our previous suggestion that a low-density circumburst environment is conducive to the production of long-lasting reverse shock radiation in the radio band. We infer the presence of a large excess X-ray absorption column, $N_{\rm H} \approx 1.5\times10^{22}~$cm$^{-2}$, and a high rest-frame optical extinction, $A_{\rm V}\approx3.4~$mag. We identify a jet break in the X-ray light curve at $t_{\rm jet}\approx6~$d, and thus derive a jet opening angle of $\theta_{\rm jet}\approx4~$deg, yielding a beaming-corrected kinetic energy and radiated $\gamma$-ray energy of $E_{\rm K}\approx4\times10^{50}~$erg and $E_{\gamma}\approx1.3\times10^{51}~$erg ($1$-$10^4~$keV, rest frame), respectively. Consistency arguments connecting the forward and reverse shocks suggest a deceleration time of $t_{\rm dec} \approx 460~$s$~\approx T_{90}$, a Lorentz factor of $\Gamma(t_{\rm dec})\approx330$, and a reverse shock to forward shock fractional magnetic energy density ratio of $R_{\rm B}\equiv\epsilon_{\rm B,RS}/\epsilon_{\rm B,FS}\approx8$.
  • The progenitors of stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe Ibc) remain to be conclsuively identified, but correlations between SN rates and host-galaxy properties can constrain progenitor models. Here, we present one result from a re-analysis of the rates from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Galaxies with stellar masses less than $\sim 10^{10}~{\rm M_\odot}$ are less efficient at producing SNe Ibc than more massive galaxies. Any progenitor scenario must seek to explain this new observation.
  • The well-studied Type IIn supernova (SN) 1998S is often dubbed the prototypical SN IIn, and it provides a unique opportunity to study its progenitor star from within as the SN lights up dense circumstellar material (CSM) launched from the progenitor. Here we present a Keck HIRES spectrum of SN 1998S taken within a few days after core collapse - both the earliest high-resolution ($\Delta\lambda < 1.0\,\AA$) spectrum published of a SN IIn and the earliest published spectrum of SN 1998S. Modern SN studies achieve impressively short turn-around times between SN detection and the first observed spectrum, but high-resolution spectra of very young supernovae are rare; the unique spectrum presented here provides a useful case study for observations of other young SN systems including SN 2013cu, which displayed a remarkably similar spectrum when very young. We examine the fully resolved emission-line profiles of SN 1998S, finding evidence for extreme mass loss from the progenitor at velocities much less than those characteristic of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. We model our high-resolution SN 1998S spectrum using the radiative-transfer code CMFGEN and explore the composition, density, and velocity gradients within the SN system. We find a mass-loss rate of $6.0 \times 10^{-3} M_{\odot}$ per year during the $\sim$15 yr before core collapse, while other studies indicate a much lower rate at earlier times (>15yr before core collapse). A comparison with a spectrum of SN 2013cu indicates many similarities, though SN 2013cu was of Type IIb - indicating that very different supernovae can arise from progenitors with extreme mass loss in the last few years before explosion.
  • The nearby Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) 2011fe and 2011by had nearly identical photospheric phase optical spectra, light-curve widths, and photometric colours, but at peak brightness SN 2011by reached a fainter absolute magnitude in all optical bands and exhibited lower flux in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). Based on those data, Foley & Kirshner (2013) argue that the progenitors of SNe 2011by and 2011fe were supersolar and subsolar, respectively, and that SN 2011fe generated 1.7 times the amount of 56Ni as SN 2011by. With this work, we extend the comparison of these SNe Ia to 10 days before and 300 days after maximum brightness with new spectra and photometry. We show that the nebular phase spectra of SNe 2011fe and 2011by are almost identical, and do not support a factor of 1.7 difference in 56Ni mass. Instead, we find it plausible that the Tully-Fisher distance for SN 2011by is an underestimate, in which case these SNe Ia may have reached similar peak luminosity, formed similar amounts of 56Ni, and had lower metallicity progenitors than previously estimated. Regardless of the true distance to SN 2011by, we find that the relative progenitor metallicity difference remains well supported by their disparity in NUV flux, which we show to be even stronger at pre-maximum epochs --- although contributions from differences in total ejecta mass, viewing angle, or progenitor density cannot be ruled out. We also demonstrate that, independent of distance modulus, SN 2011by exhibits a late-time luminosity excess that cannot be explained by a light echo, but is more likely to be the result of greater energy trapping by the nucleosynthetic products of SN 2011by.
  • Next-generation synoptic photometric surveys will yield unprecedented (for the astronomical community) volumes of data and the processes of discovery and rare-object identification are, by necessity, becoming more autonomous. Such autonomous searches can be used to find objects of interest applicable to a wide range of outstanding problems in astronomy, and in this paper we present the methods and results of a largely autonomous search for highly eccentric detached eclipsing binary systems in the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog. 106 detached eclipsing binaries with eccentricities greater than 0.1 are presented, most of which are identified here for the first time. We also present new radial-velocity curves and absolute parameters for 6 of those systems with the long-term goal of increasing the number of highly eccentric systems with orbital solutions, thereby facilitating further studies of the tidal circularization process in binary stars.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in M82 (d~3.5 Mpc) was serendipitously discovered by S. Fossey's group on 2014 Jan. 21 UT and has been confirmed to be the nearest known SN Ia since at least SN 1986G. Although SN 2014J was not discovered until ~7 days after first light, both the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory and K. Itagaki obtained several prediscovery observations of SN 2014J. With these data, we are able to constrain the object's time of first light to be Jan. 14.75 UT, only 0.82+/-0.21 d before our first detection. Interestingly, we find that the light curve is well described by a varying power law, much like SN 2013dy, which makes SN 2014J the second example of a changing power law in early-time SN Ia light curves. A low-resolution spectrum taken on Jan. 23.388 UT, ~8.70 after first light, shows that SN 2014J is a heavily reddened but otherwise spectroscopically normal SN Ia.
  • We present nebular spectra of the nearby Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh taken between 201 and 678 days after core collapse. At these late times, SN 2011dh exhibits strong emission lines including a very broad and persistent H{\alpha} feature. New models of the nebular spectra confirm that the progenitor of SN 2011dh was a low-mass giant (M ~ 13 - 15 M_sun) that ejected ~0.07 M_sun of 56Ni and ~0.27 M_sun of oxygen at the time of explosion, consistent with the recent disappearance of a candidate yellow supergiant progenitor. We show that light from the SN location is dominated by the fading SN at very late times (~2 yr) and not, for example, by a binary companion or a background source. We present evidence for interaction between the expanding SN blastwave and a circumstellar medium at late times and show that the SN is likely powered by positron deposition by ~1 yr after explosion. We also examine the geometry of the ejecta and show that SN 2011dh's nebular line profiles indicate a globally spherical explosion with aspherical components or clumps.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2013dy in NGC 7250 (d ~ 13.7 Mpc) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Combined with a prediscovery detection by the Italian Supernova Search Project, we are able to constrain the first-light time of SN 2013dy to be only 0.10 +/- 0.05 d (2.4 +/- 1.2 hr) before the first detection. This makes SN 2013dy the earliest known detection of an SN Ia. We infer an upper limit on the radius of the progenitor star of R_0 < 0.25 R_sun, consistent with that of a white dwarf. The light curve exhibits a broken power law with exponents of 0.88 and then 1.80. A spectrum taken 1.63 d after first light reveals a C II absorption line comparable in strength to Si II. This is the strongest C II feature ever detected in a normal SN Ia, suggesting that the progenitor star had significant unburned material. The C II line in SN 2013dy weakens rapidly and is undetected in a spectrum 7 days later, indicating that C II is detectable for only a very short time in some SNe Ia. SN 2013dy reached a B-band maximum of M_B = -18.72 +/- 0.03 mag ~17.7 d after first light.
  • The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) SN 2000cx was one of the most peculiar transients ever discovered, with a rise to maximum brightness typical of a SN Ia, but a slower decline and a higher photospheric temperature. Thirteen years later SN 2013bh (aka iPTF13abc), a near identical twin, was discovered and we obtained optical and near-IR photometry and low-resolution optical spectroscopy from discovery until about 1 month past r-band maximum brightness. The spectra of both objects show iron-group elements (Co II, Ni II, Fe II, Fe III, and high-velocity features [HVFs] of Ti II), intermediate-mass elements (Si II, Si III, and S II), and separate normal velocity features (~12000 km/s) and HVFs (~24000 km/s) of Ca II. Persistent absorption from Fe III and Si III, along with the colour evolution, imply high blackbody temperatures for SNe 2013bh and 2000cx (~12000 K). Both objects lack narrow Na I D absorption and exploded in the outskirts of their hosts, indicating that the SN environments were relatively free of interstellar or circumstellar material and may imply that the progenitors came from a relatively old and low-metallicity stellar population. Models of SN 2000cx, seemingly applicable to SN 2013bh, imply the production of up to ~1 M_Sun of Ni-56 and (4.3-5.5)e-3 M_Sun of fast-moving Ca ejecta.
  • We present single-epoch radio afterglow observations of 24 long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) on a timescale of >100 d after the burst. These observations trace the afterglow evolution when the blastwave has decelerated to mildly- or non-relativistic velocities and has roughly isotropized. We infer beaming-independent kinetic energies using the Sedov-Taylor self-similar solution, and find a median value for the sample of detected bursts of about 7x10^51 erg, with a 90% confidence range of 1.1x10^50-3.3x10^53 erg. Both the median and 90% confidence range are somewhat larger than the results of multi-wavelength, multi-epoch afterglow modeling (including large beaming corrections), and the distribution of beaming-corrected gamma-ray energies. This is due to bursts in our sample with only a single-frequency observation for which we can only determine an upper bound on the peak of the synchrotron spectrum. This limitation leads to a wider range of allowed energies than for bursts with a well-measured spectral peak. Our study indicates that single-epoch centimeter-band observations covering the spectral peak on a timescale of ~1 yr can provide a robust estimate of the total kinetic energy distribution with a small investment of telescope time. The substantial increase in bandwidth of the EVLA (up to 8 GHz simultaneously with full coverage at 1-40 GHz) will provide the opportunity to estimate the kinetic energy distribution of GRBs with only a few hours of data per burst.