• We build templates of rotation curves as a function of the $I-$band luminosity via the mass modeling (by the sum of a thin exponential disk and a cored halo profile) of suitably normalized, stacked data from wide samples of local spiral galaxies. We then exploit such templates to determine fundamental stellar and halo properties for a sample of about $550$ local disk-dominated galaxies with high-quality measurements of the optical radius $R_{\rm opt}$ and of the corresponding rotation velocity $V_{\rm opt}$. Specifically, we determine the stellar $M_\star$ and halo $M_{\rm H}$ masses, the halo size $R_{\rm H}$ and velocity scale ${V_{\rm H}}$, and the specific angular momenta of the stellar $j_\star$ and dark matter $j_{\rm H}$ components. We derive global scaling relationships involving such stellar and halo properties both for the individual galaxies in our sample and for their mean within bins; the latter are found to be in pleasing agreement with previous determinations by independent methods (e.g., abundance matching techniques, weak lensing observations, and individual rotation curve modeling). Remarkably, the size of our sample and the robustness of our statistical approach allow us to attain an unprecedented level of precision over an extended range of mass and velocity scales, with $1\sigma$ dispersion around the mean relationships of less than $0.1$ dex. We thus set new standard local relationships that must be reproduced by detailed physical models, that offer a basis for improving the sub-grid recipes in numerical simulations, that provide a benchmark to gauge independent observations and check for systematics, and that constitute a basic step toward the future exploitation of the spiral galaxy population as a cosmological probe.
  • The 2004-2012 X-ray time history of the NS LMXB GRS 1724-308 shows, along with the episodic brightenings associated to the low-high state transitions typical of the ATOLL sources, a peculiar, long lasting (about 300 d) flaring event, observed in 2008. This rare episode, characterised by a high-flux hard state, has never been observed before for GRS 1724-308 , and in any case is not common among ATOLL sources. We discuss here different hypotheses on the origin of this peculiar event that displayed the spectral signatures of a failed transition, similar in shape and duration to those rarely observed in Black Hole binaries. We also suggest the possibility that the atypical flare occurred in coincidence with a new rising phase of the 12-years super-orbital modulation that has been previously reported by other authors. The analysed data also confirm for GRS 1724-308 the already reported orbital period of about 90 d.
  • Galactic cosmic rays are a ubiquitous source of ionisation of the interstellar gas, competing with UV and X-ray photons as well as natural radioactivity in determining the fractional abundance of electrons, ions and charged dust grains in molecular clouds and circumstellar discs. We model the propagation of different components of Galactic cosmic rays versus the column density of the gas. Our study is focussed on the propagation at high densities, above a few g cm$^{-2}$, especially relevant for the inner regions of collapsing clouds and circumstellar discs. The propagation of primary and secondary CR particles (protons and heavier nuclei, electrons, positrons, and photons) is computed in the continuous slowing down approximation, diffusion approximation, or catastrophic approximation, by adopting a matching procedure for the different transport regimes. A choice of the proper regime depends on the nature of the dominant loss process, modelled as continuous or catastrophic. The CR ionisation rate is determined by CR protons and their secondary electrons below $\approx 130$ g cm$^{-2}$ and by electron/positron pairs created by photon decay above $\approx600$ g cm$^{-2}$. We show that a proper description of the particle transport is essential to compute the ionisation rate in the latter case, since the electron/positron differential fluxes depend sensitively on the fluxes of both protons and photons. Our results show that the CR ionisation rate in high-density environments, like, e.g., the inner parts of collapsing molecular clouds or the mid-plane of circumstellar discs, is larger than previously assumed. It does not decline exponentially with increasing column density, but follows a more complex behaviour due to the interplay of different processes governing the generation and propagation of secondary particles.
  • It is usually thought that a single equation of state (EoS) model "correctly" represents cores of all compact stars. Here we emphasize that two families of compact stars, viz., neutron stars and strange stars, can coexist in nature, and that neutron stars can get converted to strange stars through the nucleation process of quark matter in the stellar center. From our fully general relativistic numerical computations of the structures of fast-spinning compact stars, known as millisecond pulsars, we find that such a stellar conversion causes a simultaneous spin-up and decrease in gravitational mass of these stars. This is a new type of millisecond pulsar evolution through a new mechanism, which gives rise to relatively lower mass compact stars with higher spin rates. This could have implication for the observed mass and spin distributions of millisecond pulsars. Such a stellar conversion can also rescue some massive, spin-supported millisecond pulsars from collapsing into black holes. Besides, we extend the concept of critical mass $M_{\rm cr}$ for the neutron star sequence (Berezhiani et al. 2003; Bombaci et al. 2004) to the case of fast-spinning neutron stars, and point out that neutron star EoS models cannot be ruled out by the stellar mass measurement alone. Finally, we emphasize the additional complexity for constraining EoS models, for example, by stellar radius measurements using X-ray observations, if two families of compact stars coexist.
  • The continuity equation is developed for the stellar mass content of galaxies, and exploited to derive the stellar mass function of active and quiescent galaxies over the redshift range $z\sim 0-8$. The continuity equation requires two specific inputs gauged on observations: (i) the star formation rate functions determined on the basis of the latest UV+far-IR/sub-mm/radio measurements; (ii) average star-formation histories for individual galaxies, with different prescriptions for discs and spheroids. The continuity equation also includes a source term taking into account (dry) mergers, based on recent numerical simulations and consistent with observations. The stellar mass function derived from the continuity equation is coupled with the halo mass function and with the SFR functions to derive the star formation efficiency and the main sequence of star-forming galaxies via the abundance matching technique. A remarkable agreement of the resulting stellar mass function for active and quiescent galaxies, of the galaxy main sequence and of the star-formation efficiency with current observations is found; the comparison with data also allows to robustly constrain the characteristic timescales for star formation and quiescence of massive galaxies, the star formation history of their progenitors, and the amount of stellar mass added by in-situ star formation vs. that contributed by external merger events. The continuity equation is shown to yield quantitative outcomes that must be complied by detailed physical models, that can provide a basis to improve the (sub-grid) physical recipes implemented in theoretical approaches and numerical simulations, and that can offer a benchmark for forecasts on future observations with multi-band coverage, as it will become routinely achievable in the era of JWST.
  • We present a method for verifying properties of time-aware business processes, that is, business process where time constraints on the activities are explicitly taken into account. Business processes are specified using an extension of the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) and durations are defined by constraints over integer numbers. The definition of the operational semantics is given by a set OpSem of constrained Horn clauses (CHCs). Our verification method consists of two steps. (Step 1) We specialize OpSem with respect to a given business process and a given temporal property to be verified, whereby getting a set of CHCs whose satisfiability is equivalent to the validity of the given property. (Step 2) We use state-of-the-art solvers for CHCs to check the satisfiability of such sets of clauses. We have implemented our verification method using the VeriMAP transformation system, and the Eldarica and Z3 solvers for CHCs.
  • Aims. We investigate the spatial distribution of a collection of absorbing gas clouds, some associated with the dense, massive star-forming core NGC6334 I, and others with diffuse foreground clouds. For the former category, we aim to study the dynamical properties of the clouds in order to assess their potential to feed the accreting protostellar cores. Methods. We use spectral imaging from the Herschel SPIRE iFTS to construct a map of HF absorption at 243 micron in a 6x3.5 arcmin region surrounding NGC6334 I and I(N). Results. The combination of new, spatially fully sampled, but spectrally unresolved mapping with a previous, single-pointing, spectrally resolved HF signature yields a 3D picture of absorbing gas clouds in the direction of NGC6334. Toward core I, the HF equivalent width matches that of the spectrally resolved observation. The distribution of HF absorption is consistent with three of the seven components being associated with this dense star-forming envelope. For two of the remaining four components, our data suggest that these clouds are spatially associated with the larger scale filamentary star-forming complex. Our data also implies a lack of gas phase HF in the envelope of core I(N). Using a simple description of adsorption onto and desorption from dust grain surfaces, we show that the overall lower temperature of the envelope of source I(N) is consistent with freeze-out of HF, while it remains in the gas phase in source I. Conclusions. We use the HF molecule as a tracer of column density in diffuse gas (n(H) ~ 10^2 - 10^3 cm^-3), and find that it may uniquely trace a relatively low density portion of the gas reservoir available for star formation that otherwise escapes detection. At higher densities prevailing in protostellar envelopes (>10^4 cm^-3), we find evidence of HF depletion from the gas phase under sufficiently cold conditions.
  • The investigation of dynamics of the small scale magnetic field on the Sun photosphere is necessary to understand the physical processes occurring in the higher layers of solar atmosphere due to the magnetic coupling between the photosphere and the corona. We present a simulation able to address these phenomena investigating the statistics of magnetic loops reconnections. The simulation is based on N-body model approach and is divided in two computational layers. We simplify the convection problem, interpreting the larger convective scale, mesogranulation, as the result of the collective interaction of convective downflow of granular scale. The N-body advection model is the base to generate a synthetic time series of nanoflares produced by interacting magnetic loops. The reconnection of magnetic field lines is the result of the advection of the magnetic footpoints following the velocity field generated by the interacting downflows. The model gives a quantitative idea of how much energy is expected to be released by the reconfiguration of magnetic loops in the quiet Sun.
  • The inclusive large-$p_T$ production of a single pion, jet or direct photon, and Drell-Yan processes, are considered for proton-proton collisions in the kinematical range expected for the fixed-target experiment AFTER, proposed at LHC. For all these processes, predictions are given for the transverse single-spin asymmetry, $A_N$, computed according to a Generalised Parton Model previously discussed in the literature and based on TMD factorisation. Comparisons with the results of a collinear twist-3 approach, recently presented, are made and discussed.
  • Globular clusters are considerably more complex structures than previously thought, harbouring at least two stellar generations which present clearly distinct chemical abundances. Scenarios explaining the abundance patterns in globular clusters mostly assume that originally the clusters had to be much more massive than today, and that the second generation of stars originates from the gas shed by stars of the first generation (FG). The lack of metallicity spread in most globular clusters further requires that the supernova-enriched gas ejected by the FG is completely lost within ~30 Myr, a hypothesis never tested by means of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. In this paper, we use 3D hydrodynamic simulations including stellar feedback from winds and supernovae, radiative cooling and self-gravity to study whether a realistic distribution of OB associations in a massive proto-GC of initial mass M_tot ~ 10^7 M_sun is sufficient to expel its entire gas content. Our numerical experiment shows that the coherence of different associations plays a fundamental role: as the bubbles interact, distort and merge, they carve narrow tunnels which reach deeper and deeper towards the innermost cluster regions, and through which the gas is able to escape. Our results indicate that after 3 Myr, the feedback from stellar winds is responsible for the removal of ~40% of the pristine gas, and that after 14 Myr, ~ 99% of the initial gas mass has been removed.
  • After the LHC Run 1, the standard model (SM) of particle physics has been completed. Yet, despite its successes, the SM has shortcomings vis-\`{a}-vis cosmological and other observations. At the same time, while the LHC restarts for Run 2 at 13 TeV, there is presently a lack of direct evidence for new physics phenomena at the accelerator energy frontier. From this state of affairs arises the need for a consistent theoretical framework in which deviations from the SM predictions can be calculated and compared to precision measurements. Such a framework should be able to comprehensively make use of all measurements in all sectors of particle physics, including LHC Higgs measurements, past electroweak precision data, electric dipole moment, $g-2$, penguins and flavor physics, neutrino scattering, deep inelastic scattering, low-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ scattering, mass measurements, and any search for physics beyond the SM. By simultaneously describing all existing measurements, this framework then becomes an intermediate step, pointing us toward the next SM, and hopefully revealing the underlying symmetries. We review the role that the standard model effective field theory (SMEFT) could play in this context, as a consistent, complete, and calculable generalization of the SM in the absence of light new physics. We discuss the relationship of the SMEFT with the existing kappa-framework for Higgs boson couplings characterization and the use of pseudo-observables, that insulate experimental results from refinements due to ever-improving calculations. The LHC context, as well as that of previous and future accelerators and experiments, is also addressed.
  • Recent inspections of local available data suggest that the almost linear relation between the stellar mass of spheroids ($M_{\rm sph}$) and the mass of the super massive Black Holes (BHs) residing at their centres, shows a break below $M_{\rm sph} \sim 10^{10}\ {\rm M}_\odot$, with a steeper, about quadratic relation at smaller masses. We investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for the change in slope of this relation, by comparing data with the results of the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation MORGANA, which already predicted such a break in its original formulation. We find that the change of slope is mostly induced by effective stellar feedback in star-forming bulges. The shape of the relation is instead quite insensitive to other physical mechanisms connected to BH accretion such as disc instabilities, galaxy mergers, Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) feedback, or even the exact modelling of accretion onto the BH, direct or through a reservoir of low angular momentum gas. Our results support a scenario where most stars form in the disc component of galaxies and are carried to bulges through mergers and disc instabilities, while accretion onto BHs is connected to star formation in the spheroidal component. Therefore, a model of stellar feedback that produces stronger outflows in star-forming bulges than in discs will naturally produce a break in the scaling relation. Our results point to a form of co-evolution especially at lower masses, below the putative break, mainly driven by stellar feedback rather than AGN feedback.
  • We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a distant horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.
  • Galaxy merging is widely accepted to be a key driving factor in galaxy formation and evolution, while the feedback from AGN is thought to regulate the BH-bulge coevolution and the star formation process. In this context, we focused on 1SXPSJ050819.8+172149, a local (z=0.0175) Seyfert 1.9 galaxy (L_bol~4x10^43 ergs/s). The source belongs to an IR-luminous interacting pair of galaxies, characterized by a luminosity for the whole system (due to the combination of star formation and accretion) of log(L_IR/L_sun)=11.2. We present the first detailed description of the 0.3-10keV spectrum of 1SXPSJ050819.8+172149, monitored by Swift with 9 pointings performed in less than 1 month. The X-ray emission of 1SXPSJ050819.8+172149 is analysed by combining all the Swift pointings, for a total of ~72ks XRT net exposure. The averaged Swift-BAT spectrum from the 70-month survey is also analysed. The slope of the continuum is ~1.8, with an intrinsic column density NH~2.4x10^22 cm-2, and a deabsorbed luminosity L(2-10keV)~4x10^42 ergs/s. Our observations provide a tentative (2.1sigma) detection of a blue-shifted FeXXVI absorption line (rest-frame E~7.8 keV), suggesting the discovery for a new candidate powerful wind in this source. The physical properties of the outflow cannot be firmly assessed, due to the low statistics of the spectrum and to the observed energy of the line, too close to the higher boundary of the Swift-XRT bandpass. However, our analysis suggests that, if the detection is confirmed, the line could be associated with a high-velocity (vout~0.1c) outflow most likely launched within 80r_S. To our knowledge this is the first detection of a previously unknown ultrafast wind with Swift. The high NH suggested by the observed equivalent width of the line (EW~ -230eV, although with large uncertainties), would imply a kinetic output strong enough to be comparable to the AGN bolometric luminosity.
  • One of the key ingredients of the Unified Model of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) is the presence of a torus-like optically thick medium composed by dust and gas around the putative supermassive black hole. However, the structure, size and composition of this circumnuclear medium are still matter of debate. To this end, the search for column density variations through X-ray monitoring on different timescales (months, weeks and few days) is fundamental to constrain size, kinematics and location of the X-ray absorber(s). Here we describe our project of mining the Swift-XRT archive to assemble a sample of AGN with extreme column density variability and determining the physical properties of the X-ray absorber(s). We also present the results obtained from a daily-weekly Swift-XRT follow-up monitoring recently performed on one of the most interesting new candidates for variability discovered so far, Mrk 915.
  • A deep, wide-field, near-infrared imaging survey was used to construct an extinction map of the southeastern part of the California Molecular Cloud (CMC) with $\sim$ 0.5 arc min resolution. The same region was also surveyed in the $^{12}$CO(2-1), $^{13}$CO(2-1), C$^{18}$O(2-1) emission lines at the same angular resolution. Strong spatial variations in the abundances of $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O were found to be correlated with variations in gas temperature, consistent with temperature dependent CO depletion/desorption on dust grains. The $^{13}$CO to C$^{18}$O abundance ratio was found to increase with decreasing extinction, suggesting selective photodissociation of C$^{18}$O by the ambient UV radiation field. The cloud averaged X-factor is found to be $<$X$_{\rm CO}$$>$ $=$ 2.53 $\times$ 10$^{20}$ ${\rm cm}^{-2}~({\rm K~km~s}^{-1})^{-1}$, somewhat higher than the Milky Way average. On sub-parsec scales we find no single empirical value of the X-factor that can characterize the molecular gas in cold (T$_{\rm k}$ $\lesssim$ 15 K) regions, with X$_{\rm CO}$ $\propto$ A$_{\rm V}$$^{0.74}$ for A$_{\rm V}$ $\gtrsim$ 3 magnitudes. However in regions containing relatively hot (T$_{\rm ex}$ $\gtrsim$ 25 K) gas we find a clear correlation between W($^{12}$CO) and A$_{\rm V}$ over a large (3 $\lesssim$ A$_{\rm V}$ $\lesssim$ 25 mag) extinction range. This suggests a constant X$_{\rm CO}$ $=$ 1.5 $\times$ 10$^{20}$ ${\rm cm}^{-2}~({\rm K~km~s}^{-1})^{-1}$ for the hot gas, a lower value than either the average for the CMC or Milky Way. We find a correlation between X$_{\rm CO}$ and T$_{\rm ex}$ with X$_{\rm CO}$ $\propto$ T$_{\rm ex}$$^{-0.7}$ suggesting that the global X-factor of a cloud may depend on the relative amounts of hot gas within it.
  • The knowledge of the production of extinct radioactivities like 92Nb and 146Sm by photodisintegration processes in ccSN and SNIa models is essential for interpreting abundances in meteoritic material and for Galactic Chemical Evolution (GCE). The 92Mo/92Nb and 146Sm/144Sm ratios provide constraints for GCE and production sites. We present results for SNIa with emphasis on nuclear uncertainties.
  • The factorization theorem for $q_T$ spectra in Drell-Yan processes, boson production and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering allows for the determination of the non-perturbative parts of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions. Here we discuss the fit of Drell-Yan and $Z$-production data using the transverse momentum dependent formalism and the resummation of the evolution kernel. We find a good theoretical stability of the results and a final $\chi^2/{\rm points}\lesssim 1$. We show how the fixing of the non-perturbative pieces of the evolution can be used to make predictions at present and future colliders.
  • Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH>4x10^21 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L(2-10 keV)>10^44 ergs/s; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, lambda_Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to lambda_Edd=0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the "forbidden region" in the so-called "effective Eddington limit paradigm". A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disk emission, can explain this result.
  • We report on the development and characterization of the low-noise, low power, mixed analog-digital SIRIUS ASICs for both the LAD and WFM X-ray instruments of LOFT. The ASICs we developed are reading out large area silicon drift detectors (SDD). Stringent requirements in terms of noise (ENC of 17 e- to achieve an energy resolution on the LAD of 200 eV FWHM at 6 keV) and power consumption (650 {\mu}W per channel) were basis for the ASICs design. These SIRIUS ASICs are developed to match SDD detectors characteristics: 16 channels ASICs adapted for the LAD (970 microns pitch) and 64 channels for the WFM (145 microns pitch) will be fabricated. The ASICs were developed with the 180nm mixed technology of TSMC.
  • LOFT, the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing, was one of the ESA M3 mission candidates that completed their assessment phase at the end of 2013. LOFT is equipped with two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD) and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD performs pointed observations of several targets per orbit (~90 minutes), providing roughly ~80 GB of proprietary data per day (the proprietary period will be 12 months). The WFM continuously monitors about 1/3 of the sky at a time and provides data for about ~100 sources a day, resulting in a total of ~20 GB of additional telemetry. The LOFT Burst alert System additionally identifies on-board bright impulsive events (e.g., Gamma-ray Bursts, GRBs) and broadcasts the corresponding position and trigger time to the ground using a dedicated system of ~15 VHF receivers. All WFM data are planned to be made public immediately. In this contribution we summarize the planned organization of the LOFT ground segment (GS), as established in the mission Yellow Book 1 . We describe the expected GS contributions from ESA and the LOFT consortium. A review is provided of the planned LOFT data products and the details of the data flow, archiving and distribution. Despite LOFT was not selected for launch within the M3 call, its long assessment phase (> 2 years) led to a very solid mission design and an efficient planning of its ground operations.
  • During the three years long assessment phase of the LOFT mission, candidate to the M3 launch opportunity of the ESA Cosmic Vision programme, we estimated and measured the radiation damage of the silicon drift detectors (SDDs) of the satellite instrumentation. In particular, we irradiated the detectors with protons (of 0.8 and 11 MeV energy) to study the increment of leakage current and the variation of the charge collection efficiency produced by the displacement damage, and we "bombarded" the detectors with hypervelocity dust grains to measure the effect of the debris impacts. In this paper we describe the measurements and discuss the results in the context of the LOFT mission.
  • Some estimates for the transverse single spin asymmetry, A_N, in the inclusive processes l p(transv. pol.) -> h X are compared with new experimental data. The calculations are based on the Sivers and Collins functions as extracted from SIDIS azimuthal asymmetries, within a transverse momentum dependent factorization approach. The values of A_N thus obtained agree in sign and shape with the data. Predictions for future experiments are also given.
  • We derive approximated, yet very accurate analytical expressions for the abundance and clustering properties of dark matter halos in the excursion set peak framework; the latter relies on the standard excursion set approach, but also includes the effects of a realistic filtering of the density field, a mass-dependent threshold for collapse, and the prescription from peak theory that halos tend to form around density maxima. We find that our approximations work excellently for diverse power spectra, collapse thresholds and density filters. Moreover, when adopting a cold dark matter power spectra, a tophat filtering and a mass-dependent collapse threshold (supplemented with conceivable scatter), our approximated halo mass function and halo bias represent very well the outcomes of cosmological $N-$body simulations.
  • The infrared properties of blazars can be studied from the statistical point of view with the help of sky surveys, like that provided by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). However, these sources are known for their strong and unpredictable variability, which can be monitored for a handful of objects only. In this paper we consider the 28 blazars (14 BL Lac objects and 14 flat-spectrum radio quasars, FSRQs) that are regularly monitored by the GLAST-AGILE Support Program (GASP) of the Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) since 2007. They show a variety of infrared colours, redshifts, and infrared-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and thus represent an interesting mini-sample of bright blazars that can be investigated in more detail. We present near-IR light curves and colours obtained by the GASP from 2007 to 2013, and discuss the infrared-optical SEDs. These are analysed with the aim of understanding the interplay among different emission components. BL Lac SEDs are accounted for by synchrotron emission plus an important contribution from the host galaxy in the closest objects, and dust signatures in 3C 66A and Mkn 421. FSRQ SEDs require synchrotron emission with the addition of a quasar-like contribution, which includes radiation from a generally bright accretion disc, broad line region, and a relatively weak dust torus.