• Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.
  • Quantum digital signatures (QDS) provide a means for signing electronic communications with informationtheoretic security. However, all previous demonstrations of quantum digital signatures assume trusted measurement devices. This renders them vulnerable against detector side-channel attacks, just like quantum key distribution. Here, we exploit a measurement-device-independent (MDI) quantum network, over a 200-square-kilometer metropolitan area, to perform a field test of a three-party measurement-device-independent quantum digital signature (MDI-QDS) scheme that is secure against any detector side-channel attack. In so doing, we are able to successfully sign a binary message with a security level of about 1E-7. Remarkably, our work demonstrates the feasibility of MDI-QDS for practical applications.
  • We explain the use of quantum process calculus to describe and analyse linear optical quantum computing (LOQC). The main idea is to define two processes, one modelling a linear optical system and the other expressing a specification, and prove that they are behaviourally equivalent. We extend the theory of behavioural equivalence in the process calculus Communicating Quantum Processes (CQP) to include multiple particles (namely photons) as information carriers, described by Fock states or number states. We summarise the theory in this paper, including the crucial result that equivalence is a congruence, meaning that it is preserved by embedding in any context. In previous work, we have used quantum process calculus to model LOQC but without verifying models against specifications. In this paper, for the first time, we are able to carry out verification. We illustrate this approach by describing and verifying two models of an LOQC CNOT gate.
  • We describe the use of quantum process calculus to describe and analyze quantum communication protocols, following the successful field of formal methods from classical computer science. We have extended the quantum process calculus to describe d-dimensional quantum systems, which has not been done before. We summarise the necessary theory in the generalisation of quantum gates and Bell states and use the theory to apply the quantum process calculus CQP to quantum protocols, namely qudit teleportation and superdense coding.
  • We describe the use of quantum process calculus to describe and analyze quantum communication protocols, following the successful field of formal methods from classical computer science. The key idea is to define two systems, one modelling a protocol and one expressing a specification, and prove that they are behaviourally equivalent. We summarize the necessary theory in the process calculus CQP, including the crucial result that equivalence is a congruence, meaning that it is preserved by embedding in any context. We illustrate the approach by analyzing two versions of a quantum error correction system.