• The random-field Ising model (RFIM) is one of the simplest statistical-mechanical models that captures the anomalous irreversible collective response seen in a wide range of physical, biological, or socio-economic situations in the presence of interactions and intrinsic heterogeneity or disorder. When slowly driven at zero temperature it can display an out-of-equilibrium phase transition associated with critical scaling ("crackling noise"), while it undergoes at equilibrium, under either temperature or disorder-strength changes, a thermodynamic phase transition. We show that the out-of-equilibrium and equilibrium critical behaviors are in the same universality class: they are controlled, in the renormalization-group (RG) sense, by the same zero-temperature fixed point. We do so by combining a field-theoretical formalism that accounts for the multiple metastable states and the exact (functional) RG. As a spin-off, we also demonstrate that critical fluids in disordered porous media are in the same universality class as the RFIM, thereby unifying a broad spectrum of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phenomena.
  • We show that, contrary to previous suggestions based on computer simulations or erroneous theoretical treatments, the critical points of the random-field Ising model out of equilibrium, when quasi-statically changing the applied source at zero temperature, and in equilibrium are not in the same universality class below some critical dimension $d_{DR}\approx 5.1$. We demonstrate this by implementing a non-perturbative functional renormalization group for the associated dynamical field theory. Above $d_{DR}$, the avalanches, which characterize the evolution of the system at zero temperature, become irrelevant at large distance, and hysteresis and equilibrium critical points are then controlled by the same fixed point. We explain how to use computer simulation and finite-size scaling to check the correspondence between in and out of equilibrium criticality in a far less ambiguous way than done so far.
  • We present a numerical study of the many-body localization (MBL) phenomenon in the high-temperature limit within an anisotropic Heisenberg model with random local fields. Taking the dynamical spin conductivity $\sigma(\omega)$ as the test quantity, we investigate the full frequency dependence of sample-to-sample fluctuations and their scaling properties as a function of the system size $L\leq 28$ and the frequency resolution. We identify differences between the general interacting case $\Delta>0$ and the anisotropy $\Delta=0$, the latter corresponding to the standard Anderson localization. Except for the extreme MBL case when the relative sample-to-sample fluctuations became large, numerical results allow for the extraction of the low-$\omega$ dependence of the conductivity. Results for the d.c. value $\sigma_0$ indicate a crossover into the MBL regime, i.e. an exponential-like variation with the disorder strength $W$. For the same regime, our numerical analysis indicates that the low-frequency exponent $\alpha$ exhibits a small departure from $\alpha\sim 1$ only.
  • The random-field Ising model shows extreme critical slowdown that has been described by activated dynamic scaling: the characteristic time for the relaxation to equilibrium diverges exponentially with the correlation length, $\ln \tau\sim \xi^\psi/T$ , with $\psi$ an \textit{a priori} unknown barrier exponent. Through a nonperturbative functional renormalization group, we show that for spatial dimensions $d$ less than a critical value $d_{DR} \simeq 5.1$, also associated with dimensional-reduction breakdown, $\psi=\theta$ with $\theta$ the temperature exponent near the zero-temperature fixed point that controls the critical behavior. For $d>d_{DR}$ on the other hand, $\psi=\theta-2\lambda$ where $\theta=2$ and $\lambda>0$ a new exponent. At the upper critical dimension $d=6$, $\lambda=1$ so that $\psi=0$, and activated scaling gives way to conventional scaling. We give a physical interpretation of the results in terms of collective events in real space, avalanches and droplets. We also propose a way to check the two regimes by computer simulations of long-range 1-$d$ systems.
  • We study the critical behavior of the one-dimensional random field Ising model (RFIM) with long-range interactions ($\propto r^{-(d+\sigma)}$) by the nonperturbative functional renormalization group. We find two distinct regimes of critical behavior as a function of $\sigma$, separated by a critical value $\sigma_c$. What distinguishes these two regimes is the presence or not of a cusp-like nonanalyticity in the functional dependence of the renormalized cumulants of the random field at the fixed point. This change of behavior can be associated to the characteristics of the large-scale avalanches present in the system at zero temperature. We propose ways to check these predictions through lattice simulations. We also discuss the difference with the RFIM on the Dyson hierarchical lattice.
  • We consider the zero-temperature fixed points controlling the critical behavior of the $d$-dimensional random-field Ising, and more generally $O(N)$, models. We clarify the nature of these fixed points and their stability in the region of the $(N,d)$ plane where one passes from a critical behavior satisfying the $d\rightarrow d-2$ dimensional reduction to one where it breaks down due to the appearance of strong enough nonanalyticities in the functional dependence of the cumulants of the renormalized disorder. We unveil an intricate and unusual behavior.
  • We show that the critical scaling behavior of random-field systems with short-range interactions and disorder correlations cannot be described in general by only two independent exponents, contrary to previous claims. This conclusion is based on a theoretical description of the whole (d,N) domain of the d-dimensional random-field O(N) model and points to the role of rare events that are overlooked by the proposed derivations of two-exponent scaling. Quite strikingly, however, the numerical estimates of the critical exponents of the random field Ising model are extremely close to the predictions of the two-exponent scaling, so that the issue cannot be decided on the basis of numerical simulations.
  • We have done a finite-size scaling study of a continuous phase transition altered by the quenched bond disorder, investigating systems at quasicritical temperatures of each disorder realization by using the equilibriumlike invaded cluster algorithm. Our results indicate that in order to access the thermal critical exponent $y_\tau$, it is necessary to average the free energy at quasicritical temperatures of each disorder configuration. Despite the thermal fluctuations on the scale of the system at the transition point, we find that spatial inhomogeneities form in the system and become more pronounced as the size of the system increases. This leads to different exponents describing rescaling of the fluctuations of observables in disorder and thermodynamic ensembles.
  • We present a detailed study of the Equilibriumlike invaded cluster algorithm (EIC), recently proposed as an extension of the invaded cluster (IC) algorithm, designed to drive the system to criticality while still preserving the equilibrium ensemble. We perform extensive simulations on two special cases of the Potts model and examine the precision of critical exponents by including the leading corrections. We show that both thermal and magnetic critical exponents can be obtained with high accuracy compared to the best available results. The choice of the auxiliary parameters of the algorithm is discussed in context of dynamical properties. We also discuss the relation to the Li-Sokal bound for the dynamical exponent $z$.
  • The invaded cluster approach is extended to 2D Potts model with annealed vacancies by using the random-cluster representation. Geometrical arguments are used to propose the algorithm which converges to the tricritical point in the two-dimensional parameter space spanned by temperature and the chemical potential of vacancies. The tricritical point is identified as a simultaneous onset of the percolation of a Fortuin-Kasteleyn cluster and of a percolation of "geometrical disorder cluster". The location of the tricritical point and the concentration of vacancies for q = 1, 2, 3 are found to be in good agreement with the best known results. Scaling properties of the percolating scaling cluster and related critical exponents are also presented.