• We describe an update to the Herschel-SPIRE Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (FTS) calibration for extended sources, which incorporates a correction for the frequency-dependent far-field feedhorn efficiency, $\eta_\mathrm{FF}$. This significant correction affects all FTS extended-source calibrated spectra in sparse or mapping mode, regardless of the spectral resolution. Line fluxes and continuum levels are underestimated by factors of 1.3-2 in the Spectrometer Long-Wavelength band (SLW, 447-1018 GHz; 671-294 $\mu$m) and 1.4-1.5 in the Spectrometer Short-Wavelength band (SSW, 944-1568 GHz; 318-191 $\mu$m). The correction was implemented in the FTS pipeline version 14.1 and has also been described in the SPIRE Handbook since Feb 2017. Studies based on extended-source calibrated spectra produced prior to this pipeline version should be critically reconsidered using the current products available in the Herschel Science Archive. Once the extended-source calibrated spectra are corrected for $\eta_\mathrm{FF}$, the synthetic photometry and the broadband intensities from SPIRE photometer maps agree within 2-4% -- similar levels to the comparison of point-source calibrated spectra and photometry from point-source calibrated maps. The two calibration schemes for the FTS are now self-consistent: the conversion between the corrected extended-source and point-source calibrated spectra can be achieved with the beam solid angle and a gain correction that accounts for the diffraction loss.
  • We present stacked average far-infrared spectra of a sample of 197 dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) at $0.005 < z < 4$ using close to 90% of the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) extragalactic data archive from the Herschel Space Observatory based on 3.5 years of science operations. These spectra explore an observed-frame $\rm 447\,GHz-1568\,GHz$ ($\rm 191\,\mu m-671\,\mu m$) frequency (wavelength) range allowing us to observe the main atomic and molecular lines emitted by gas in the interstellar medium. The sample is sub-divided into five redshift bins at $0.005 < z < 0.05$, $0.05 < z < 0.2$, $0.2 < z < 0.5$, $0.8 < z <2$, and $2 < z < 4$. To study the dependence of observed spectral lines on total infrared luminosity, the sources in a subset of the redshift bins are stacked in luminosity bins. These stacked spectra are used to determine the average properties of the interstellar medium and dense molecular gas properties of DSFGs, in particular, the fine-structure line ([CII] 158 $\mu$m and [OI] 63 $\mu$m) luminosity ratios, and the line to far-IR luminosity ratios are used to model the gas density and radiation field strength in the photodissociation regions (PDRs). For the low-redshift sample, we additionally present the average spectral line energy distributions (SLED) of CO and $\rm{H_2O}$ rotational transitions and also consider PDR conditions based on a combination of [CI] 370 $\mu$m and 609 $\mu$m and $\rm CO (7-6)$ lines. For the high-z ($0.8 < z < 4$) sample PDR models suggest a molecular gas distribution in the presence of a radiation field that is at least a factor of 10$^3$ larger than the Milky-Way and with a neutral gas density of roughly 10$^3$ to 10$^5$ cm$^{-3}$. The corresponding PDR models for the low-z sample suggest a UV radiation field and gas density comparable to those at high-z.
  • The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) was launched as one of the scientific instruments on board of the space observatory Herschel. The SPIRE photometer opened up an entirely new window in the Submillimeter domain for large scale mapping, that up to then was very difficult to observe. There are already several catalogs that were produced by individual Herschel science projects. Yet, we estimate that the objects of only a fraction of these maps will ever be systematically extracted and published by the science teams that originally proposed the observations. The SPIRE instrument performed its standard photometric observations in an optically very stable configuration, only moving the telescope across the sky, with variations in its configuration parameters limited to scan speed and sampling rate. This and the scarcity of features in the data that require special processing steps made this dataset very attractive for producing an expert reduced catalog of point sources that is being described in this document. The Catalog was extracted from a total of 6878 unmodified SPIRE scan map observations. The photometry was obtained by a systematic and homogeneous source extraction procedure, followed by a rigorous quality check that emphasized reliability over completeness. Having to exclude regions affected by strong Galactic emission, that pushed the limits of the four source extraction methods that were used, this catalog is aimed primarily at the extragalactic community. The result can serve as a pathfinder for ALMA and other Submillimeter and Far-Infrared facilities. 1,693,718 sources are included in the final catalog, splitting into 950688, 524734, 218296 objects for the 250\mu m, 350\mu m, and 500\mu m bands, respectively. The catalog comes with well characterized environments, reliability, completeness, and accuracies, that single programs typically cannot provide.
  • Data from the Herschel Space Observatory is freely available to the public but no uniformly processed catalogue of the observations has been published so far. To date, the Herschel Science Archive does not contain the exact sky coverage (footprint) of individual observations and supports search for measurements based on bounding circles only. Drawing on previous experience in implementing footprint databases, we built the Herschel Footprint Database and Web Services for the Herschel Space Observatory to provide efficient search capabilities for typical astronomical queries. The database was designed with the following main goals in mind: (a) provide a unified data model for meta-data of all instruments and observational modes, (b) quickly find observations covering a selected object and its neighbourhood, (c) quickly find every observation in a larger area of the sky, (d) allow for finding solar system objects crossing observation fields. As a first step, we developed a unified data model of observations of all three Herschel instruments for all pointing and instrument modes. Then, using telescope pointing information and observational meta-data, we compiled a database of footprints. As opposed to methods using pixellation of the sphere, we represent sky coverage in an exact geometric form allowing for precise area calculations. For easier handling of Herschel observation footprints with rather complex shapes, two algorithms were implemented to reduce the outline. Furthermore, a new visualisation tool to plot footprints with various spherical projections was developed. Indexing of the footprints using Hierarchical Triangular Mesh makes it possible to quickly find observations based on sky coverage, time and meta-data. The database is accessible via a web site (http://herschel.vo.elte.hu) and also as a set of REST web service functions.
  • The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the sub-mm and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinised and still has a large potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments. Some source catalogues have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that risk to remain unexplored. To maximise the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, we are in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalogue (HPSC) from all primary and parallel mode observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The catalogue will be made available online through archives like the Herschel Science Archive (HSA), the Infrared Science Archive (IRSA), and the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS).
  • The cores of clusters at 0 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousands km/s. The first GLACE results target the H$\alpha$/[NII] lines in the cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395 covering $\sim$ 2 $\times$ r$_{vir}$. We discuss the techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations to generate the catalogue of H$\alpha$ emitters of 174 unique cluster sources down to a SFR below 1 M$_{\odot}$/yr. The AGN population is discriminated using different diagnostics and found to be $\sim$ 37% of the ELG population. The median SFR is 1.4 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We have studied the spatial distribution of ELG, confirming the existence of two components in the redshift space. Finally, we have exploited the outstanding spectral resolution of the TF to estimate the cluster mass from ELG dynamics, finding M$_{200}$ = 4.1 $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\odot} h^{-1}$, in agreement with previous weak-lensing estimates.
  • Dusty, star-forming galaxies have a critical role in the formation and evolution of massive galaxies in the Universe. Using deep far-infrared imaging in the range 100-500um obtained with the Herschel telescope, we investigate the dust-obscured star formation in the galaxy cluster XDCP J0044.0-2033 at z=1.58, the most massive cluster at z >1.5, with a measured mass M200= 4.7x10$^{14}$ Msun. We perform an analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 12 cluster members (5 spectroscopically confirmed) detected with >3$\sigma$ significance in the PACS maps, all ULIRGs. The individual star formation rates (SFRs) lie in the range 155-824 Ms/yr, with dust temperatures of 24$\pm$35 K. We measure a strikingly high amount of star formation (SF) in the cluster core, SFR (< 250 kpc) > 1875$\pm$158 Ms/yr, 4x higher than the amount of star formation in the cluster outskirts. This scenario is unprecedented in a galaxy cluster, showing for the first time a reversal of the SF-density relation at z~1.6 in a massive cluster.
  • We have studied in detail a sample of 967 SPIRE sources with 5-sigma detections at 350 and 500 micron and associations with Spitzer-SWIRE 24 micron galaxies in the HerMES-Lockman survey area, fitting their mid- and far-infrared, and submillimetre, SEDs in an automatic search with a set of six infrared templates. For almost 300 galaxies we have modelled their SEDs individually to ensure the physicality of the fits. We confirm the need for the new cool and cold cirrus templates, and also of the young starburst template, introduced in earlier work. We also identify 109 lensing candidates via their anomalous SEDs and provide a set of colour-redshift constraints which allow lensing candidates to be identified from combined Herschel and Spitzer data. The picture that emerges of the submillimetre galaxy population is complex, comprising ultraluminous and hyperluminous starbursts, lower luminosity galaxies dominated by interstellar dust emission, lensed galaxies and galaxies with surprisingly cold (10-13K) dust. 11 % of 500$\mu$m selected sources are lensing candidates. 70 % of the unlensed sources are ultraluminous infrared galaxies and 26 % are hyperluminous. 34 % are dominated by optically thin interstellar dust ('cirrus') emission, but most of these are due to cooler dust than is characteristic of our Galaxy. At the highest infrared luminosities we see SEDs dominated by M82, Arp220 and young starburst types, in roughly equal proportions.
  • We report the results from a 19-h integration with the SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer aboard the Herschel Space Observatory which has revealed the presence of a molecular outflow from the Cosmic Eyelash (SMM J2135-0102) via the detection of blueshifted OH absorption. Detections of several fine-structure emission lines indicate low-excitation HII regions contribute strongly to the [CII] luminosity in this z = 2.3 ULIRG. The OH feature suggests a maximum wind velocity of 700 km/s, which is lower than the expected escape velocity of the host dark matter halo, ~1000 km/s. A large fraction of the available molecular gas could thus be converted into stars via a burst protracted by the resulting gas fountain, until an AGN-driven outflow can eject the remaining gas.
  • The Herschel SPIRE Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) performs spectral imaging in the 447-1546 GHz band. It can observe in three spatial sampling modes: sparse mode, with a single pointing on sky, or intermediate or full modes with 1 and 1/2 beam spacing, respectively. In this paper, we investigate the uncertainty and repeatability for fully sampled FTS mapping observations. The repeatability is characterised using nine observations of the Orion Bar. Metrics are derived based on the ratio of the measured intensity in each observation compared to that in the combined spectral cube from all observations. The mean relative deviation is determined to be within 2%, and the pixel-by-pixel scatter is ~7%. The scatter increases towards the edges of the maps. The uncertainty in the frequency scale is also studied, and the spread in the line centre velocity across the maps is found to be ~15 km/s. Other causes of uncertainty are also discussed including the effect of pointing and the additive uncertainty in the continuum.
  • We present a method to derive the relative pointing offsets for SPIRE Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (FTS) solar system object (SSO) calibration targets, which were observed regularly throughout the Herschel mission. We construct ratios of the spectra for all observations of a given source with respect to a reference. The reference observation is selected iteratively to be the one with the highest observed continuum. Assuming that any pointing offset leads to an overall shift of the continuum level, then these ratios represent the relative flux loss due to mispointing. The mispointing effects are more pronounced for a smaller beam, so we consider only the FTS short wavelength array (SSW, 958-1546 GHz) to derive a pointing correction. We obtain the relative pointing offset by comparing the ratio to a grid of expected losses for a model source at different distances from the centre of the beam, under the assumption that the SSW FTS beam can be well approximated by a Gaussian. In order to avoid dependency on the point source flux conversion, which uses a particular observation of Uranus, we use extended source flux calibrated spectra to construct the ratios for the SSOs. In order to account for continuum variability, due to the changing distance from the Herschel telescope, the SSO ratios are normalised by the expected model ratios for the corresponding observing epoch. We confirm the accuracy of the derived pointing offset by comparing the results with a number of control observations, where the actual pointing of Herschel is known with good precision. Using the method we derived pointing offsets for repeated observations of Uranus (including observations centred on off-axis detectors), Neptune, Ceres and NGC7027. The results are used to validate and improve the point-source flux calibration of the FTS.
  • The Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) of the Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE) on board the ESA Herschel Space Observatory has two detector setting modes: (a) a nominal mode, which is optimized for observing moderately bright to faint astronomical targets, and (b) a bright-source mode recommended for sources significantly brighter than 500 Jy, within the SPIRE FTS bandwidth of 446.7-1544 GHz (or 194-671 microns in wavelength), which employs a reduced detector responsivity and out-of-phase analog signal amplifier/demodulator. We address in detail the calibration issues unique to the bright-source mode, describe the integration of the bright-mode data processing into the existing pipeline for the nominal mode, and show that the flux calibration accuracy of the bright-source mode is generally within 2% of that of the nominal mode, and that the bright-source mode is 3 to 4 times less sensitive than the nominal mode.
  • Emission from the Herschel telescope is the dominant source of radiation for the majority of SPIRE Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) observations, despite the exceptionally low emissivity of the primary and secondary mirrors. Accurate modelling and removal of the telescope contribution is, therefore, an important and challenging aspect of FTS calibration and data reduction pipeline. A dust-contaminated telescope model with time invariant mirror emissivity was adopted before the Herschel launch. However, measured FTS spectra show a clear evolution of the telescope contribution over the mission and strong need for a correction to the standard telescope model in order to reduce residual background (of up to 7 Jy) in the final data products. Systematic changes in observations of dark sky, taken over the course of the mission, provide a measure of the evolution between observed telescope emission and the telescope model. These dark sky observations have been used to derive a time dependent correction to the telescope emissivity that reduces the systematic error in the continuum of the final FTS spectra to ~0.35 Jy.
  • Herschel/SPIRE Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) observations contain emission from both the Herschel Telescope and the SPIRE Instrument itself, both of which are typically orders of magnitude greater than the emission from the astronomical source, and must be removed in order to recover the source spectrum. The effects of the Herschel Telescope and the SPIRE Instrument are removed during data reduction using relative spectral response calibration curves and emission models. We present the evolution of the methods used to derive the relative spectral response calibration curves for the SPIRE FTS. The relationship between the calibration curves and the ultimate sensitivity of calibrated SPIRE FTS data is discussed and the results from the derivation methods are compared. These comparisons show that the latest derivation methods result in calibration curves that impart a factor of between 2 and 100 less noise to the overall error budget, which results in calibrated spectra for individual observations whose noise is reduced by a factor of 2-3, with a gain in the overall spectral sensitivity of 23% and 21% for the two detector bands, respectively.
  • The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich muti-wavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide area (20x20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer/MIPS at 24um, in conjunction with Herschel 5-band imaging from 100-500um, we investigate the dust-obscured, star-formation properties in the cluster and its associated large scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z=1.62 detected at 24um (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r <1 Mpc projected clustercentric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 Ms/yr, with a median of 55 Ms/yr, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster brightest FIR galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256$\pm$70 Ms/yr, and the total cluster SFR enclosed in a circle of 1 Mpc is 1161$\pm$96 Ms/yr. We estimate a dust extinction of about 3 magnitudes by comparing the SFRs derived from [OII] luminosity with the ones computed from the 24um fluxes. We find that the in-falling region (1-3 Mpc) is special: there is a significant decrement (3.5x) of passive relative to star-forming galaxies in this region, and the total SFR of the galaxies located in this region is lower (130 Ms/yr/Mpc2) than anywhere in the cluster or field, regardless of their stellar mass. In a complementary approach we compute the local galaxy density, Sigma5, and find no trend between SFR and Sigma5. However, we measure an excess of star-forming galaxies in the cluster relative to the field by a factor 1.7, that lends support to a reversal of the SF-density relation in CLG0218.
  • MS$\,$0451.6$-$0305 is a rich galaxy cluster whose strong lensing is particularly prominent at submm wavelengths. We combine new SCUBA-2 data with imaging from Herschel SPIRE and PACS and HST in order to try to understand the nature of the sources being lensed. In the region of the "giant submm arc," we uncover seven multiply imaged galaxies (up from the previously known three), of which six are found to be at a redshift of $z\sim2.9$, and possibly constitute an interacting system. Using a novel forward-modelling approach, we are able to simultaneously deblend and fit SEDs to the individual galaxies that contribute to the giant submm arc, constraining their dust temperatures, far infrared luminosities and star formation rates. The submm arc first identified by SCUBA can now be seen to be composed of at least five distinct sources, four of these within the galaxy group at $z\sim2.9$. The total unlensed luminosity for this galaxy group is $(3.1\pm0.3) \times 10^{12}\,\mathrm{L}_\odot$, which gives an unlensed star formation rate of $(450\pm50)$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. From the properties of this system, we see no evidence of evolution towards lower temperatures in the dust temperature versus far-infrared luminosity relation for high redshift galaxies.
  • We report the serendipitous detection of a significant overdensity of Herschel-SPIRE 250 micron sources in the vicinity of MRC1138-26. We use an adaptive kernel density estimate to quantify the significance, including a comparison with other fields. The overdensity has a size of ~3.5-4' and stands out at ~5sigma with respect to the background estimate. No features with similar significance were found in four extragalactic control fields: GOODS-North, Lockman, COSMOS and UDS. The chance of having a similar overdensity in a field with the same number but randomly distributed sources is less than 2%. The clump is also visible as a low surface brightness feature in the Planck 857 GHz map. We detect 76 sources at 250 micron (with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3), in a region of 4' radius; 43 of those are above a flux density limit of 20 mJy. This is a factor of 3.6 in excess over the average in the four control fields, considering only the sources above 20 mJy. We also find an excess in the number counts of sources with 250 micron flux densities between 30 and 40 mJy, compared to deep extragalactic blank-field number counts. Assuming a fixed dust temperature (30 K) and emissivity (beta=1.5) a crude, blackbody-derived redshift distribution, zBB, of the detected sources is significantly different from the distributions in the control fields and exhibits a significant peak at zBB ~ 1.5, although the actual peak redshift is highly degenerate with the temperature. We tentatively suggest, based on zBB and the similar S250/S350 colours of the sources within the peak, that a significant fraction of the sources in the clump may be at a similar redshift. Since the overdensity lies ~7' south of the z=2.16 Spiderweb protocluster MRC1138-26, an intriguing possibility (that is presently unverifiable given the data in hand) is that it lies within the same large-scale structure.(abridged)
  • We propose a co-ordinated multi-observatory survey at the North Ecliptic Pole. This field is the natural extragalactic deep field location for most space observatories (e.g. containing the deepest Planck, WISE and eROSITA data), is in the continuous viewing zones for e.g. Herschel, HST, JWST, and is a natural high-visibility field for the L2 halo orbit of SPICA with deep and wide-field legacy surveys already planned. The field is also a likely deep survey location for the forthcoming Euclid mission. It is already a multi-wavelength legacy field in its own right (e.g. AKARI, LOFAR, SCUBA-2): the outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage in this field and nowhere else enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field, by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN hot dust. We argue from the science needs of Euclid and JWST, and from the comparative multiwavelength depths, that the logical approach is (1) a deep (H-UDF) UV/optical tile in the NEP over ~10 square arcminutes, and (2) an overlapping wide-field UV/optical HST survey tier covering >100 square arcminutes, with co-ordinated submm SPIRE mapping up to or beyond the submm point source confusion limit over a wider area and PACS data over the shallower HST tier.
  • The Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) on the European Space Agency's Herschel Space Observatory utilizes a pioneering design for its imaging spectrometer in the form of a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS). The standard FTS data reduction and calibration schemes are aimed at objects with either a spatial extent much larger than the beam size or a source that can be approximated as a point source within the beam. However, when sources are of intermediate spatial extent, neither of these calibrations schemes is appropriate and both the spatial response of the instrument and the source's light profile must be taken into account and the coupling between them explicitly derived. To that end, we derive the necessary corrections using an observed spectrum of a fully extended source with the beam profile and the source's light profile taken into account. We apply the derived correction to several observations of planets and compare the corrected spectra with their spectral models to study the beam coupling efficiency of the instrument in the case of partially extended sources. We find that we can apply these correction factors for sources with angular sizes up to \theta_{D} ~ 17". We demonstrate how the angular size of an extended source can be estimated using the difference between the sub-spectra observed at the overlap bandwidth of the two frequency channels in the spectrometer, at 959<\nu<989 GHz. Using this technique on an observation of Saturn, we estimate a size of 17.2", which is 3% larger than its true size on the day of observation. Finally, we show the results of the correction applied on observations of a nearby galaxy, M82, and the compact core of a Galactic molecular cloud, Sgr B2.
  • We have compiled a large sample of 151 high redshift (z=0.5-4) galaxies selected at 24 microns (S24>100 uJy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-infrared spectrum into contributions from star formation and activity in the galactic nuclei. In addition, we have a wealth of photometric data from Spitzer IRAC/MIPS and Herschel PACS/SPIRE. We explore how effective different infrared color combinations are at separating our mid-IR spectroscopically determined active galactic nuclei from our star forming galaxies. We look in depth at existing IRAC color diagnostics, and we explore new color-color diagnostics combining mid-IR, far-IR, and near-IR photometry, since these combinations provide the most detail about the shape of a source's IR spectrum. An added benefit of using a color that combines far-IR and mid-IR photometry is that it is indicative of the power source driving the IR luminosity. For our data set, the optimal color selections are S250/S24 vs. S8.0/S3.6 and S100/S24 vs. S8.0/S3.6; both diagnostics have ~10% contamination rate in the regions occupied primarily by star forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei, respectively. Based on the low contamination rate, these two new IR color-color diagnostics are ideal for estimating both the mid-IR power source of a galaxy when spectroscopy is unavailable and the dominant power source contributing to the IR luminosity. In the absence of far-IR data, we present color diagnostics using the WISE mid-IR bands which can efficiently select out high z (z~2) star forming galaxies.
  • We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 microns) spectral energy distributions of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 microns (S24 > 100 uJy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion (~25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z~1 star-forming (SF) sources; z~2 SF sources; AGN with clear 9.7 micron silicate absorption; and AGN with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 microns, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite spectral energy distribution (SED) for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant (~20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high redshift systems. High redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high redshift IR luminous galaxies.
  • Dusty galaxies at z ~ 2 span a wide range of relative brightness between rest-frame mid-infrared (8um) and ultraviolet wavelengths. We attempt to determine the physical mechanism responsible for this diversity. Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), which have rest-frame mid-IR to UV flux density ratios > 1000, might be abnormally bright in the mid-IR, perhaps due to prominent AGN and/or PAH emission, or abnormally faint in the UV. We use far-infrared data from the GOODS-Herschel survey to show that most DOGs with 10^12 L_Sun < L_IR < 10^13 L_Sun are not abnormally bright in the mid-IR when compared to other dusty galaxies with similar IR (8--1000um) luminosities. We observe a relation between the median IR to UV luminosity ratios and the median UV continuum power-law indices for these galaxies, and we find that only 24% have specific star formation rates which indicate the dominance of compact star-forming regions. This circumstantial evidence supports the idea that the UV- and IR-emitting regions in these galaxies are spatially coincident, which implies a connection between the abnormal UV faintness of DOGs and dust obscuration. We conclude that the range in rest-frame mid-IR to UV flux density ratios spanned by dusty galaxies at z ~ 2 is due to differing amounts of UV obscuration. Of galaxies with these IR luminosities, DOGs are the most obscured. We attribute differences in UV obscuration to either: 1) differences in the degree of alignment between the spatial distributions of dust and massive stars, or 2) differences in the total dust content.
  • We have processed 2774 high-galactic observations from the XMM archive (as of May 2010) and extracted a serendipitous catalogue of some 850 clusters of galaxies based on purely X-ray criteria, following the methodology developed for the XMM-LSS survey. Restricting the sample to the highest signal-to-noise objects (347 clusters), we perform a cosmological analysis using the X-ray information only. The analysis consists in the modelling of the observed colour-magnitude (CR-HR) diagram constructed from cluster instrumental count-rates measured in the [0.5-2], [1-2] and [0.5-1] keV bands. A MCMC procedure simultaneously fits the cosmological parameters, the evolution of the cluster scaling laws and the selection effects. Our results are consistent with the sigma_8 and Omega_m values obtained by WMAP-5 and point toward a negative evolution of the cluster scaling relations with respect to the self-similar expectation. We are further able to constrain the cluster fractional radius xc0=r_c/r500c, to xc0=0.24 +/- 0.04. This study stresses again the critical role of selection effects in deriving cluster scaling relations, even in the local universe. Finally, we show that CR-HR method applied to the eRosita all-sky survey - provided that cluster photometric redshifts are available - will enable the determination of the equation of state of the dark energy at the level of the DETF stage IV predictions; simultaneously, the evolution of the cluster scaling-relations will be unambiguously determined. The XMM CLuster Archive Super Survey (XCLASS) serendipitous cluster catalogue is available online at: http://xmm-lss.in2p3.fr:8080/l4sdb/.
  • The FIR/submm window is one of the least-studied regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, yet this wavelength range is absolutely crucial for understanding the physical processes and properties of the ISM in galaxies. The advent of the Herschel Space Observatory has opened up the entire FIR/submm window for spectroscopic studies. We present the first FIR/submm spectroscopic results on both nearby and distant galaxies obtained in the frame of two Herschel key programs: the Very Nearby Galaxies Survey and the Herschel ATLAS.
  • We present Herschel-SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) and radio follow-up observations of two Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) detected strongly lensed distant galaxies. In one of the targeted galaxies H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) we detect [OIII] 88\mum and [CII] 158\mum lines at a signal-to-noise ratio of ~5. We do not have any positive line identification in the other fainter target H-ATLAS J091305.0-005343 (SDP.130). Currently SDP.81 is the faintest sub-mm galaxy with positive line detections with the FTS, with continuum flux just below 200 mJy in the 200-600 \mum wavelength range. The derived redshift of SDP.81 from the two detections is z=3.043 +/-0.012, in agreement with ground-based CO measurements. This is the first detection by Herschel of the [OIII] 88\mum line in a galaxy at redshift higher than 0.05. Comparing the observed lines and line ratios with a grid of photo-dissociation region (PDR) models with different physical conditions, we derive the PDR cloud density n ~ 2000 cm^{-3} and the far-UV ionizing radiation field G_0 ~ 200 (in units of the Habing field -- the local Galactic interstellar radiation field of 1.6x10^{-6} W/m^2). Using the CO derived molecular mass and the PDR properties we estimate the effective radius of the emitting region to be 500-700 pc. These characteristics are typical for star-forming, high redshift galaxies. The radio observations indicate that SDP.81 deviates significantly from the local FIR/radio correlation, which hints that some fraction of the radio emission is coming from an AGN. The constraints on the source size from millimiter-wave observations put a very conservative upper limit of the possible AGN contribution to less than 33%. These indications, together with the high [OIII]/FIR ratio and the upper limit of [OI] 63\mum/[CII] 158\mum suggest that some fraction of the ionizing radiation is likely to originate from an AGN.