• Engineering atomic-scale structures allows great manipulation of physical properties and chemical processes for advanced technology. We show that the B atoms deployed at the centers of honeycombs in boron sheets, borophene, behave as nearly perfect electron donors for filling the graphitic $\sigma$ bonding states without forming additional in-plane bonds by first-principles calculations. The dilute electron density distribution owing to the weak bonding surrounding the center atoms provides easier atomic-scale engineering and is highly tunable via in-plane strain, promising for practical applications, such as modulating the extraordinarily high thermal conductance that exceeds the reported value in graphene. The hidden honeycomb bonding structure suggests an unusual energy sequence of core electrons that has been verified by our high-resolution core-level photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. With the experimental and theoretical evidence, we demonstrate that borophene exhibits a peculiar bonding structure and is distinctive among two-dimensional materials.
  • Topological nodal line semimetals, a novel quantum state of materials, possess topologically nontrivial valence and conduction bands that touch at a line near the Fermi level. The exotic band structure can lead to various novel properties, such as long-range Coulomb interaction and flat Landau levels. Recently, topological nodal lines have been observed in several bulk materials, such as PtSn4, ZrSiS, TlTaSe2 and PbTaSe2. However, in two-dimensional materials, experimental research on nodal line fermions is still lacking. Here, we report the discovery of two-dimensional Dirac nodal line fermions in monolayer Cu2Si based on combined theoretical calculations and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The Dirac nodal lines in Cu2Si form two concentric loops centred around the {\Gamma} point and are protected by mirror reflection symmetry. Our results establish Cu2Si as a new platform to study the novel physical properties in two-dimensional Dirac materials and provide new opportunities to realize high-speed low-dissipation devices.
  • Experiments of time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (Tr-XMCD) and resonant x-ray scattering at a beamline BL07LSU in SPring-8 with a time-resolution of under 50 ps are presented. A micro-channel plate is utilized for the Tr-XMCD measurements at nearly normal incidence both in the partial electron and total fluorescence yield (PEY and TFY) modes at the L2,3 absorption edges of the 3d transition-metals in the soft x-ray region. The ultrafast photo-induced demagnetization within 50 ps is observed on the dynamics of a magnetic material of FePt thin film, having a distinct threshold of the photon density. The spectrum in the PEY mode is less-distorted both at the L2,3 edges compared with that in the TFY mode and has the potential to apply the sum rule analysis for XMCD spectra in pump-probed experiments.
  • Honeycomb structures of group IV elements can host massless Dirac fermions with non-trivial Berry phases. Their potential for electronic applications has attracted great interest and spurred a broad search for new Dirac materials especially in monolayer structures. We present a detailed investigation of the \beta 12 boron sheet, which is a borophene structure that can form spontaneously on a Ag(111) surface. Our tight-binding analysis revealed that the lattice of the \beta 12-sheet could be decomposed into two triangular sublattices in a way similar to that for a honeycomb lattice, thereby hosting Dirac cones. Furthermore, each Dirac cone could be split by introducing periodic perturbations representing overlayer-substrate interactions. These unusual electronic structures were confirmed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and validated by first-principles calculations. Our results suggest monolayer boron as a new platform for realizing novel high-speed low-dissipation devices.
  • We determine the band structure and spin texture of WTe2 by spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (SARPES). With the support of first-principles calculations, we reveal the existence of spin polarization of both the Fermi arc surface states and bulk Fermi pockets. Our results support WTe2 to be a type-II Weyl semimetal candidate and provide important information to understand its extremely large and nonsaturating magnetoresistance.
  • The search for metallic boron allotropes has attracted great attention in the past decades and recent theoretical works predict the existence of metallicity in monolayer boron. Here, we synthesize the \b{eta}12-sheet monolayer boron on a Ag(111) surface and confirm the presence of metallic boron-derived bands using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi surface is composed of one electron pocket at the S point and a pair of hole pockets near the X point, which is supported by the first-principles calculations. The metallic boron allotrope in \b{eta}12 sheet opens the way to novel physics and chemistry in material science.
  • We report unprecedented evidence of a spin split one-dimensional metallic surface state for the system of Si(557)-Au obtained by means of high-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy combined with first principles calculations. The surface state shows double parabolic energy dispersions along the Au chain structure together with a reversal of the spin polarization with respect to the time-reversal symmetry point as is characteristic from the Rashba effect. Moreover, we have observed a considerably large out-of-plane spin polarization which we attribute to the highly anisotropic wave function of the gold chains.
  • Spin-polarized band structure of the three-dimensional quantum spin Hall insulator $\rm Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x}$ (x=0.12-0.13) was fully elucidated by spin-polarized angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy using a high-yield spin polarimeter equipped with a high-resolution electron spectrometer. Between the two time-reversal-invariant points, $\bar{\varGamma}$ and $\bar{M}$, of the (111) surface Brillouin zone, a spin-up band ($\Sigma_3$ band) was found to cross the Fermi energy only once, providing unambiguous evidence for the strong topological insulator phase. The observed spin-polarized band dispersions determine the "mirror chirality" to be -1, which agrees with the theoretical prediction based on first-principles calculations.