• We present ALMA 850 $\mu$m continuum observations of the Orion Nebula Cluster that provide the highest angular resolution ($\sim 0\rlap{.}''1 \approx 40$ AU) and deepest sensitivity ($\sim 0.1$ mJy) of the region to date. We mosaicked a field containing $\sim 225$ optical or near-IR-identified young stars, $\sim 60$ of which are also optically-identified "proplyds". We detect continuum emission at 850 $\mu$m towards $\sim 80$% of the proplyd sample, and $\sim 50$% of the larger sample of previously-identified cluster members. Detected objects have fluxes of $\sim 0.5$-80 mJy. We remove sub-mm flux due to free-free emission in some objects, leaving a sample of sources detected in dust emission. Under standard assumptions of isothermal, optically thin disks, sub-mm fluxes correspond to dust masses of $\sim 0.5$ to 80 Earth masses. We measure the distribution of disk sizes, and find that disks in this region are particularly compact. Such compact disks are likely to be significantly optically thick. The distributions of sub-mm flux and inferred disk size indicate smaller, lower-flux disks than in lower-density star-forming regions of similar age. Measured disk flux is correlated weakly with stellar mass, contrary to studies in other star forming regions that found steeper correlations. We find a correlation between disk flux and distance from the massive star $\theta^1$ Ori C, suggesting that disk properties in this region are influenced strongly by the rich cluster environment.
  • We present ALMA observations of the Orion Nebula that cover the OMC1 outflow region. Our focus in this paper is on compact emission from protoplanetary disks. We mosaicked a field containing $\sim 600$ near-IR-identified young stars, around which we can search for sub-mm emission tracing dusty disks. Approximately 100 sources are known proplyds identified with HST. We detect continuum emission at 1 mm wavelengths towards $\sim 20\%$ of the proplyd sample, and $\sim 8\%$ of the larger sample of near-IR objects. The noise in our maps allows 4$\sigma$ detection of objects brighter than $\sim 1.5$ mJy, corresponding to protoplanetary disk masses larger than 1.5 M$_{\rm J}$ (using standard assumptions about dust opacities and gas-to-dust ratios). None of these disks are detected in contemporaneous CO(2-1) or C$^{18}$O(2-1) observations, suggesting that the gas-to-dust ratios may be substantially smaller than the canonical value of 100. Furthermore, since dust grains may already be sequestered in large bodies in ONC disks, the inferred masses of disk solids may be underestimated. Our results suggest that the distribution of disk masses in this region is compatible with the detection rate of massive planets around M dwarfs, which are the dominant stellar constituent in the ONC.
  • We have obtained ALMA Band 7 observations of the FU Ori outburst system at 0.6"x0.5" resolution to measure the link between the inner disk instability and the outer disk through sub-mm continuum and molecular line observations. Our observations detect continuum emission which can be well modeled by two unresolved sources located at the position of each binary component. The interferometric observations recover the entire flux reported in previous single-dish studies, ruling out the presence of a large envelope. Assuming that the dust is optically thin, we derive disk dust masses of $2\times 10^{-4}$M$_{\odot}$ and $8\times 10^{-5}$M$_{\odot}$, for the north and south components respectively. We place limits on the disks' radii of $r<$45 AU. We report the detection of molecular emission from $^{12}$CO(3-2), HCO$^{+}$(4-3) and from HCN(4-3). The $^{12}$CO appears widespread across the two binary components, and is slightly more extended than the continuum emission. The denser gas tracer HCO$^{+}$ peaks close to the position of the southern binary component, while HCN appears peaked at the position of the northern component. This suggests that the southern binary component is embedded in denser molecular material, consistent with previous studies that indicate a heavily reddened object. At this angular resolution any interaction between the two unresolved disk components cannot be disentangled. Higher resolution images are vital to understanding the process of star formation via rapid accretion FU Ori-type episodes.
  • Context. Astrometric monitoring of directly-imaged exoplanets allows the study of their orbital parameters and system architectures. Because most directly-imaged planets have long orbital periods (>20 AU), accurate astrometry is challenging when based on data acquired on timescales of a few years and usually with different instruments. The LMIRCam camera on the LBT is being used for the LEECH survey to search for and characterize young and adolescent exoplanets in L' band, including their system architectures. Aims. We first aim to provide a good astrometric calibration of LMIRCam. Then, we derive new astrometry, test the predictions of the orbital model of 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance proposed by Go\'zdziewski & Migaszewski, and perform new orbital fitting of the HR 8799 bcde planets. We also present deep limits on a putative fifth planet interior to the known planets. Methods. We use observations of HR 8799 and the Theta1 Ori C field obtained during the same run in October 2013. Results. We first characterize the distortion of LMIRCam. We determine a platescale and a true north orientation for the images of 10.707 +/- 0.012 mas/pix and -0.430 +/- 0.076 deg, respectively. The errors on the platescale and true north orientation translate into astrometric accuracies at a separation of 1 of 1.1 mas and 1.3 mas, respectively. The measurements for all planets are usually in agreement within 3 sigma with the ephemeris predicted by Go\'zdziewski & Migaszewski. The orbital fitting based on the new astrometric measurements favors an architecture for the planetary system based on 8:4:2:1 mean motion resonance. The detection limits allow us to exclude a fifth planet slightly brighter/more massive than HR 8799 b at the location of the 2:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~9.5 AU) and about twice as bright as HR 8799 cde at the location of the 3:1 resonance with HR 8799 e (~7.5 AU).
  • We present multi-epoch non-redundant masking observations of the T Cha transition disk, taken at the VLT and Magellan in H, Ks, and L' bands. T Cha is one of a small number of transition disks that host companion candidates discovered by high-resolution imaging techniques, with a putative companion at a position angle of 78 degrees, separation of 62 mas, and contrast at L' of 5.1 mag. We find comparable binary parameters in our re-reduction of the initial detection images, and similar parameters in the 2011 L', 2013 NaCo L', and 2013 NaCo Ks data sets. We find a close-in companion signal in the 2012 NaCo L' dataset that cannot be explained by orbital motion, and a non-detection in the 2013 MagAO/Clio2 L' data. However, Monte-carlo simulations show that the best fits to the 2012 NaCo and 2013 MagAO/Clio2 followup data may be consistent with noise. There is also a significant probability of false non-detections in both of these data sets. We discuss physical scenarios that could cause the best fits, and argue that previous companion and scattering explanations are inconsistent with the results of the much larger dataset presented here.
  • We present new K-band spectroscopy of the UY Aur binary star system. Our data are the first to show H$_{2}$ emission in the spectrum of UY Aur A and the first to spectrally resolve the Br{\gamma} line in the spectrum of UY Aur B. We see an increase in the strength of the Br{\gamma} line in UY Aur A and a decrease in Br{\gamma} and H$_{2}$ line luminosity for UY Aur B compared to previous studies. Converting Br{\gamma} line luminosity to accretion rate, we infer that the accretion rate onto UY Aur A has increased by $2 \times 10^{-9}$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ per year since a rate of zero was observed in 1994. The Br{\gamma} line strength for UY Aur B has decreased by a factor of 0.54 since 1994, but the K-band flux has increased by 0.9 mags since 1998. The veiling of UY Aur B has also increased significantly. These data evince a much more luminous disk around UY Aur B. If the lower Br{\gamma} luminosity observed in the spectrum of UY Aur B indicates an intrinsically smaller accretion rate onto the star, then UY Aur A now accretes at a higher rate than UY Aur B. However, extinction at small radii or mass pile-up in the circumstellar disk could explain decreased Br{\gamma} emission around UY Aur B even when the disk luminosity implies an increased accretion rate. In addition to our scientific results for the UY Aur system, we discuss a dedicated pipeline we have developed for the reduction of echelle-mode data from the ARIES spectrograph.
  • We present near-IR spectra of a sample of T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be, and FU Ori objects. Using the FSPEC instrument on the Bok 90-inch telescope, we obtained K-band spectra with a resolution of ~3500. Here we present spectra of the v=2->0 and v=3->1 bandheads of ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. We observed these spectra over multiple epochs spaced by a few days and approximately one month. Several of our targets show CO emission or absorption features. However we see little evidence of variability in these features across multiple epochs. We compare our results with previous observations, and discuss the physical implications of non-variable CO emission across the sampled timescales.
  • The 229 GHz (lambda 1.3mm) radio emission from Orion-KL was mapped with up to 0.14" angular resolution with CARMA, allowing measurements of the flux densities of Source I ('SrcI') and the Becklin-Neugebauer Object (BN), the 2 most massive stars in this region. We find integrated flux densities of 310 +/- 45 mJy for SrcI and 240 +/- 35 mJy for BN. SrcI is optically thick even at 229 GHz. No trace of the H30alpha recombination line is seen in its spectrum, although the v_2=1, 5(5,0)-6(4,3) transition of H2O, 3450 K above the ground state, is prominent. SrcI is elongated at position angle 140 degrees, as in 43 GHz images. These results are most easily reconciled with models in which the radio emission from SrcI arises via the H- free-free opacity in a T < 4500 K disk, as considered by Reid et al. (2007). By contrast, the radio spectrum of BN is consistent with p+/e- free-free emission from a dense (n_e ~ 5x10^7 cm^{-3}), but otherwise conventional, hypercompact HII region. The source is becoming optically thin at 229 GHz, and the H30alpha recombination line, at VLSR = 23.2 +/- 0.5 km/sec, is prominent in its spectrum. A Lyman continuum flux of 5x10^{45} photons/sec, consistent with that expected from a B star, is required to maintain the ionization. Supplementary 90 GHz observations were made to measure the H41alpha and H42alpha recombination lines toward BN. Published 43 and 86 GHz data suggest that SrcI brightened with respect to BN over the 15 year period from 1994 to 2009.
  • We present imaging observations at 1.3 mm wavelength of Class I protostars in the Taurus star forming region, obtained with the CARMA interferometer. Of an initial sample of 10 objects, we detected and imaged millimeter wavelength emission from 9. One of the 9 is resolved into two sources, and detailed analysis of this binary protostellar system is deferred to a future paper. For the remaining 8 objects, we use the CARMA data to determine the basic morphology of the millimeter emission. Combining the millimeter data with 0.9 micron images of scattered light, Spitzer IRS spectra, and broadband SEDs (all from the literature), we attempt to determine the structure of the circumstellar material. We consider models including both circumstellar disks and envelopes, and constrain the masses (and other structural parameters) of each of these components. We show that the disk masses in our sample span a range from <0.01 to >0.1 Msun. The disk masses for our sample are significantly higher than for samples of more evolved Class II objects. Thus, Class I disk masses probably provide a more accurate estimate of the initial mass budget for star and planet formation. However, the disk masses determined here are lower than required by theories of giant planet formation. The masses also appear too low for gravitational instability, which could lead to high mass accretion rates. Even in these Class I disks, substantial particle growth may have hidden much of the disk mass in hard-to-see larger bodies.
  • We present simulations of Keck Interferometer ASTRA and VLTI GRAVITY observations of mock star fields in orbit within ~50 milliarcseconds of Sgr A*. Dual-field phase referencing techniques, as implemented on ASTRA and planned for GRAVITY, will provide the sensitivity to observe Sgr A* with infrared interferometers. Our results show an improvement in the confusion noise limit over current astrometric surveys, opening a window to study stellar sources in the region. Since the Keck Interferometer has only a single baseline, the improvement in the confusion limit depends on source position angles. The GRAVITY instrument will yield a more compact and symmetric PSF, providing an improvement in confusion noise which will not depend as strongly on position angle. Our Keck results show the ability to characterize the star field as containing zero, few, or many bright stellar sources. We are also able to detect and track a source down to mK~18 through the least confused regions of our field of view at a precision of ~200 microarcseconds along the baseline direction. This level of precision improves with source brightness. Our GRAVITY results show the potential to detect and track multiple sources in the field. GRAVITY will perform ~10 microarcsecond astrometry on a mK=16.3 source and ~200 microarcsecond astrometry on a mK=18.8 source in six hours of monitoring a crowded field. Monitoring the orbits of several stars will provide the ability to distinguish between multiple post-Newtonian orbital effects, including those due to an extended mass distribution around Sgr A* and to low-order General Relativistic effects. Early characterizations of the field by ASTRA including the possibility of a precise source detection, could provide valuable information for future GRAVITY implementation and observation.
  • We present Keck Interferometer observations of the three prototypical FU Orionis stars, FU Ori, V1057 Cyg, and V1515 Cyg. With a spatial resolution of a few milli-arcseconds and a spectral resolution of 2000, our near-infrared observations spatially resolve gas and dust emission extending from stellocentric radii of ~0.05 AU to several AU. We fit these data with accretion disk models where each stellocentric radius of the disk is represented by a supergiant-type stellar emission spectrum at the disk temperature. A disk model is consistent with the data for FU Ori, although we require some local asymmetry in the disk. For V1057 Cyg the disk model does not fit our data well, especially compared to the fit quality achieved for FU Ori. We speculate that a disk wind may be contributing substantially to the observed near-IR emission in this source. The data for V1515 Cyg are noisier than the data obtained for the other two objects, and do not strongly constrain the validity of an accretion disk model.
  • We present two epochs of observations of TW Hya from the high-dispersion near-IR spectrograph ARIES at the MMT. We detect strong emission from the Brackett gamma transition of hydrogen, indicating an accretion rate substantially larger than previously estimated using hydrogen line emission. The Brackett gamma line-strength varies across our two observed epochs. We also measure circumstellar-to-stellar flux ratios (i.e., veilings) that appear close to zero in both epochs. These findings suggest that TW Hya experiences episodes of enhanced accretion while the inner disk remains largely devoid of dust. We discuss several physical mechanisms that may explain these observations.
  • The ASTrometric and phase-Referenced Astronomy (ASTRA) project will provide phase referencing and astrometric observations at the Keck Interferometer, leading to enhanced sensitivity and the ability to monitor orbits at an accuracy level of 30-100 microarcseconds. Here we discuss recent scientific results from ASTRA, and describe new scientific programs that will begin in 2010-2011. We begin with results from the "self phase referencing" (SPR) mode of ASTRA, which uses continuum light to correct atmospheric phase variations and produce a phase-stabilized channel for spectroscopy. We have observed a number of protoplanetary disks using SPR and a grism providing a spectral dispersion of ~2000. In our data we spatially resolve emission from dust as well as gas. Hydrogen line emission is spectrally resolved, allowing differential phase measurements across the emission line that constrain the relative centroids of different velocity components at the 10 microarcsecond level. In the upcoming year, we will begin dual-field phase referencing (DFPR) measurements of the Galactic Center and a number of exoplanet systems. These observations will, in part, serve as precursors to astrometric monitoring of stellar orbits in the Galactic Center and stellar wobbles of exoplanet host stars. We describe the design of several scientific investigations capitalizing on the upcoming phase-referencing and astrometric capabilities of ASTRA.
  • We report on the successful science verification phase of a new observing mode at the Keck interferometer, which provides a line-spread function width and sampling of 150km/s at K'-band, at a current limiting magnitude of K'~7mag with spatial resolution of lam/2B ~2.7mas and a measured differential phase stability of unprecedented precision (3mrad at K=5mag, which represents 3uas on sky or a centroiding precision of 10^-3). The scientific potential of this mode is demonstrated by the presented observations of the circumstellar disk of the evolved Be-star 48Lib. In addition to indirect methods such as multi-wavelength spectroscopy and polaritmetry, the here described spectro-interferometric astrometry provides a new tool to directly constrain the radial density structure in the disk. We resolve for the first time several Pfund emission lines, in addition to BrGam, in a single interferometric spectrum, and with adequate spatial and spectral resolution and precision to analyze the radial disk structure in 48Lib. The data suggest that the continuum and Pf-emission originates in significantly more compact regions, inside of the BrGam emission zone. Thus, spectro-interferometric astrometry opens the opportunity to directly connect the different observed line profiles of BrGam and Pfund in the total and correlated flux to different disk radii. The gravitational potential of a rotationally flattened Be star is expected to induce a one-armed density perturbation in the circumstellar disk. Such a slowly rotating disk oscillation has been used to explain the well known periodic V/R spectral profile variability in these stars, as well as the observed V/R cycle phase shifts between different disk emission lines. The differential line properties and linear constraints set by our data lend support to the existence of a radius-dependent disk density perturbation.
  • We present near-infrared observations of T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars with a spatial resolution of a few milli-arcseconds and a spectral resolution of ~2000. Our observations spatially resolve gas and dust in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, and spectrally resolve broad-linewidth emission from the Brackett gamma transition of hydrogen gas. We use the technique of spectro-astrometry to determine centroids of different velocity components of this gaseous emission at a precision orders of magnitude better than the angular resolution. In all sources, we find the gaseous emission to be more compact than or distributed on similar spatial scales to the dust emission. We attempt to fit the data with models including both dust and Brackett gamma-emitting gas, and we consider both disk and infall/outflow morphologies for the gaseous matter. In most cases where we can distinguish between these two models, the data show a preference for infall/outflow models. In all cases, our data appear consistent with the presence of some gas at stellocentric radii of ~0.01 AU. Our findings support the hypothesis that Brackett gamma emission generally traces magnetospherically driven accretion and/or outflows in young star/disk systems.
  • [Abridged] We imaged a 2' x 2' region of the Orion Nebula cluster in 1.3 mm wavelength continuum emission with the recently commissioned Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Our mosaics include >250 known near-IR cluster members, of which 36 are so-called "proplyds" that have been imaged previously with the Hubble Space Telescope. We detected 40 sources in 1 mm continuum emission, and several of them are spatially resolved with our observations. Dust masses inferred for detected sources range from 0.01 to 0.5 Msun, and the average disk mass for undetected sources is estimated to be ~0.001 Msun, approximately an order of magnitude smaller than the minimum mass solar nebula. Most stars in the ONC thus do not appear to currently possess sufficient mass in small dust grains to form Jupiter-mass (or larger) planets. Comparison with previous results for younger and older regions indicates that massive disks evolve significantly on ~Myr timescales. We also show that the percentage of stars in Orion surrounded by disks more massive than ~0.01 Msun is substantially lower than in Taurus, indicating that environment has an impact on the disk mass distribution. Finally, we explore potential correlations of disk mass with stellar mass and location within the cluster.
  • We report observations of the recurrent nova RS Oph using long-baseline near-IR interferometry. We are able to resolve emission from the nova for several weeks after the February 2006 outburst. The near-IR source initially expands to a size of approximately 5 milli-arcseconds. However, beginning around day 10 the IR source appears to begin to shrink, reaching approximately 2 milli-arcseconds by day 100. We combine our measured angular diameters with previously available interferometric and photometric data to derive an emission measure for the source, and hence are able to determine the mass-loss rate of the nova in the days following the outburst.
  • We present Keck Interferometer observations of TW Hya that spatially resolve its emission at 2 micron wavelength. Analyzing these data together with existing K-band veiling and near-infrared photometric measurements, we conclude that the inner disk consists of optically thin, sub-micron-sized dust extending from ~4 AU to within 0.06 AU of the central star. The inner disk edge may be magnetospherically truncated. Even if we account for the presence of gas in the inner disk, these small dust grains have survival times against radiation blow-out that are orders of magnitude shorter than the age of the system, suggesting continual replenishment through collisions of larger bodies.
  • We have observed 14 Herbig Ae/Be sources with the long-baseline near-IR Palomar Testbed Interferometer, All except two sources are resolved at 2.2 um, with angular sizes generally <5 mas. We determine the size scales and orientations of the 2.2 um emission using various models: uniform disks, Gaussians, uniform rings, flat accretion disks with inner holes, and flared disks with puffed-up inner rims; 7 objects display significantly inclined morphologies, generally compatible with the outer disk geometries inferred from millimeter interferometric observations, implying that HAEBE disks are not significantly warped. Using the derived inner disk sizes and inclinations, we compute the spectral energy distributions for two simple physical disk models, and compare these with observed SEDs compiled from the literature and new near-IR photometry. While geometrically flat accretion disk models are consistent with the data for the earliest spectral types in our sample (MWC 297, V1685 Cyg, and MWC 1080), the later-type sources are explained better through models incorporating puffed-up inner disk walls; this may indicate different accretion mechanisms for early and late-type Herbig Ae/Be stars.
  • We determine the distribution of circumstellar disk masses in the young (~0.3 Myr) cluster NGC 2024 by imaging a 2.5'x2.5' region in 3mm continuum emission to an RMS noise level of ~0.75 mJy/beam with the Owens Valley Millimeter Array. The mosaic encompasses 147 K-band sources as well as the molecular ridge seen previously in dust continuum emission. We detect 10 point-like sources in 3mm continuum emission above the level of 5-sigma within the unit gain region of the mosaic. One of these sources corresponds to the near-IR source IRS 2, an early B-type star. Two other sources are tentatively associated with low-mass near-IR cluster members, and the remaining 7 sources have no K-band counterparts. Assuming the millimeter continuum point sources represent emission from circumstellar disks and/or envelopes, then ~6% of the total population (infrared and millimeter sources) in the NGC 2024 mosaic has a circumstellar mass in excess of ~0.06 solar masses. We obtain further constraints on the average circumstellar disk mass by considering the mean millimeter continuum flux observed toward a sample of 140 K-band sources that likely have stellar masses <1-2 Msun. While none of these sources are detected individually above the 3-sigma limit of ~0.035 Msun, the ensemble of sources are detected in the mean at the 5-sigma level with a mean disk mass of ~0.005 Msun. Compared to the older (~2 Myr) cluster IC 348, NGC 2024 contains a higher frequency of massive disks/envelopes and has a higher mean disk mass by a factor of 2.5 +/- 1.3 among K-band sources, suggesting that the mean circumstellar mass is decreasing with cluster age. We also compare the results for the NGC 2024 and IC 348 clusters to those for the lower-density Taurus star forming region.