• We examine the distribution of the [O/Fe] abundance ratio in stars across the Galactic disk using H-band spectra from the Apache Point Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE). We minimize systematic errors by considering groups of stars with similar atmospheric parameters. The APOGEE measurements in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 reveal that the square root of the star-to-star cosmic variance in the oxygen-to-iron ratio at a given metallicity is about 0.03-0.04 dex in both the thin and thick disk. This is about twice as high as the spread found for solar twins in the immediate solar neighborhood and the difference is probably associated to the wider range of galactocentric distances spanned by APOGEE stars. We quantify the uncertainties by examining the spread among stars with the same parameters in clusters; these errors are a function of effective temperature and metallicity, ranging between 0.005 dex at 4000 K and solar metallicity, to about 0.03 dex at 4500 K and [Fe/H]= -0.6. We argue that measuring the spread in [O/Fe] and other abundance ratios provides strong constraints for models of Galactic chemical evolution.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey--III (SDSS--III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has obtained high resolution (R $\sim$ 22,500), high signal-to-noise ratio ($>$ 100) spectra in the H$-$band ($\sim$1.5$-$1.7 $\mu$m) for about 146,000 stars in the Milky Way galaxy. We have computed spectral libraries with effective temperature ($T\rm{_{eff}}$) ranging from 3500 to 8000 K for the automated chemical analy\-sis of the survey data. The libraries, used to derive stellar parameters and abundances from the APOGEE spectra in the SDSS--III data release 12 (DR12), are based on ATLAS9 model atmospheres and the ASS$\epsilon$T spectral synthesis code. We present a second set of libraries based on MARCS model atmospheres and the spectral synthesis code Turbospectrum. The ATLAS9/ASS$\epsilon$T ($T\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$8000 K) and MARCS/Turbospectrum ($T\rm{_{eff}}$ = 3500$-$5500 K) grids cover a wide range of metallicity ($-$2.5 $\leq$ [M/H] $\leq$ $+$0.5 dex), surface gravity (0 $\leq$ log $g$ $\leq$ 5 dex), microturbulence (0.5 $\leq$ $\xi$ $\leq$ 8 km~s$^{-1}$), carbon ($-$1 $\leq$ [C/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex), nitrogen ($-$1 $\leq$ [N/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex), and $\alpha$-element ($-$1 $\leq$ [$\alpha$/M] $\leq$ $+$1 dex) variations, having thus seven dimensions. We compare the ATLAS9/ASS$\epsilon$T and MARCS/Turbospectrum libraries and apply both of them to the analysis of the observed H$-$band spectra of the Sun and the K2 giant Arcturus, as well as to a selected sample of well-known giant stars observed at very high-resolution. The new APOGEE libraries are publicly available and can be employed for chemical studies in the H$-$band using other high-resolution spectrographs.
  • We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z=1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 sq. arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z=1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope (beta) is redder than at high redshift (z>3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z=1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L*<~L<~2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1-sigma uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of ~0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of ~0.90. These relations hold true --- within luminosities probed in this study --- for LBGs from z~1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z~2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z>3, a true Lyman break selection at z~2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.
  • The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) is an on-going HST Multicycle Treasury program to image ~1/3 of M31's star forming disk in 6 filters, from the UV to the NIR. The full survey will resolve the galaxy into more than 100 million stars with projected radii from 0-20 kpc over a contiguous 0.5 square degree area in 828 orbits, producing imaging in the F275W and F336W filters with WFC3/UVIS, F475W and F814W with ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W with WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The photometry reaches SNR=4 at F275W=25.1, F336W=24.9, F475W=27.9, F814W=27.1, F110W=25.5, and F160W=24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 magnitudes brighter in the inner bulge. All pointings are dithered and produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products, along with extensive tests of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially-dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of RGB stars, in a way that is independent of the assumed M/L and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of stars with ages >1 Gyr. (Abridged)
  • In the first of a series of forthcoming publications, we present a panchromatic catalog of 102 visually-selected early-type galaxies (ETGs) from observations in the Early Release Science (ERS) program with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-South (GOODS-S) field. Our ETGs span a large redshift range, 0.35 < z < 1.5, with each redshift spectroscopically-confirmed by previous published surveys of the ERS field. We combine our measured WFC3 ERS and ACS GOODS-S photometry to gain continuous sensitivity from the rest-frame far-UV to near-IR emission for each ETG. The superior spatial resolution of the HST over this panchromatic baseline allows us to classify the ETGs by their small-scale internal structures, as well as their local environment. By fitting stellar population spectral templates to the broad-band photometry of the ETGs, we determine that the average masses of the ETGs are comparable to the characteristic stellar mass of massive galaxies, 11< log(M [Solar]) < 12. By transforming the observed photometry into the GALEX FUV and NUV, Johnson V, and SDSS g' and r' bandpasses we identify a noteworthy diversity in the rest-frame UV-optical colors and find the mean rest-frame (FUV-V)=3.5 and (NUV-V)=3.3, with 1$\sigma$ standard deviations approximately equal to 1.0. The blue rest-frame UV-optical colors observed for most of the ETGs are evidence for star-formation during the preceding gigayear, but no systems exhibit UV-optical photometry consistent with major recent (<~50 Myr) starbursts. Future publications which address the diversity of stellar populations likely to be present in these ETGs, and the potential mechanisms by which recent star-formation episodes are activated, are discussed.
  • PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.35" on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83\circ inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N - the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 year baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N & S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 \pm 2 pc with an age of 5-10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of Herbig-Haro knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7\circ \pm 6\circ on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73\circ \pm 7\circ. The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N & S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25\circ \pm 9\circ. This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T Tauri wide binaries.
  • We present grism spectra of emission-line galaxies (ELGs) from 0.6-1.6 microns from the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. These new infrared grism data augment previous optical Advanced Camera for Surveys G800L 0.6-0.95 micron grism data in GOODS-South from the PEARS program, extending the wavelength covereage well past the G800L red cutoff. The ERS grism field was observed at a depth of 2 orbits per grism, yielding spectra of hundreds of faint objects, a subset of which are presented here. ELGs are studied via the Ha, [OIII], and [OII] emission lines detected in the redshift ranges 0.2<z<1.4, 1.2<z<2.2 and 2.0<z<3.3 respectively in the G102 (0.8-1.1 microns; R~210) and G141 (1.1-1.6 microns; R~130) grisms. The higher spectral resolution afforded by the WFC3 grisms also reveals emission lines not detectable with the G800L grism (e.g., [SII] and [SIII] lines). From these relatively shallow observations, line luminosities, star-formation rates, and grism spectroscopic redshifts are determined for a total of 48 ELGs to m(AB)~25 mag. Seventeen GOODS-South galaxies that previously only had photometric redshifts now have new grism-spectroscopic redshifts, in some cases with large corrections to the photometric redshifts (Delta(z)~0.3-0.5). Additionally, one galaxy had no previously-measured redshift but now has a secure grism-spectroscopic redshift, for a total of 18 new GOODS-South spectroscopic redshifts. The faintest source in our sample has a magnitude m(AB)=26.9 mag. The ERS grism data also reflect the expected trend of lower specific star formation rates for the highest mass galaxies in the sample as a function of redshift, consistent with downsizing and discovered previously from large surveys. These results demonstrate the remarkable efficiency and capability of the WFC3 NIR grisms for measuring galaxy properties to faint magnitudes and redshifts to z>2.
  • We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z~1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 sq.arcmin in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in 3 UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W- and F336W-dropouts, which are z~1.7, 2.1 and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z~2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well studied z~>3 and z~0 regimes, (2) the combined number counts agrees very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, and the faint-end slope, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z<3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z~1 to z~9, and significantly enhance our understanding of these galaxies using HST sensitivity and resolution.
  • We present results on the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at 1<z<2 drawn from the Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no on-going star formation at z>1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in ~40 square arcmin to H<25 mag. We supplement spectroscopic redshifts from the literature with photometric redshifts determined from the 15-band photometry from 0.22-8 micron. We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical PSF. We find that size evolution is a strong function of stellar mass, with the most massive (M* ~ 10^11 Msol) galaxies undergoing the most rapid evolution from z~2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1+z)^{-alpha}, we find a tentative scaling between alpha and stellar mass of alpha ~ -1.8+1.4 log(M*/10^9 Msol). We briefly discuss the implications of this result for our understanding of the dynamical evolution of the red galaxies.
  • We constrain the distribution of calcium across the surface of the white dwarf star G29-38 by combining time series spectroscopy from Gemini-North with global time series photometry from the Whole Earth Telescope. G29-38 is actively accreting metals from a known debris disk. Since the metals sink significantly faster than they mix across the surface, any inhomogeneity in the accretion process will appear as an inhomogeneity of the metals on the surface of the star. We measure the flux amplitudes and the calcium equivalent width amplitudes for two large pulsations excited on G29-38 in 2008. The ratio of these amplitudes best fits a model for polar accretion of calcium and rules out equatorial accretion.
  • We present an analysis of the luminosity distances of Type Ia Supernovae from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey in conjunction with other intermediate redshift (z<0.4) cosmological measurements including redshift-space distortions from the Two-degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect seen by the SDSS, and the latest Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale from both the SDSS and 2dFGRS. We have analysed the SDSS-II SN data alone using a variety of "model-independent" methods and find evidence for an accelerating universe at >97% level from this single dataset. We find good agreement between the supernova and BAO distance measurements, both consistent with a Lambda-dominated CDM cosmology, as demonstrated through an analysis of the distance duality relationship between the luminosity (d_L) and angular diameter (d_A) distance measures. We then use these data to estimate w within this restricted redshift range (z<0.4). Our most stringent result comes from the combination of all our intermediate-redshift data (SDSS-II SNe, BAO, ISW and redshift-space distortions), giving w = -0.81 +0.16 -0.18(stat) +/- 0.15(sys) and Omega_M=0.22 +0.09 -0.08 assuming a flat universe. This value of w, and associated errors, only change slightly if curvature is allowed to vary, consistent with constraints from the Cosmic Microwave Background. We also consider more limited combinations of the geometrical (SN, BAO) and dynamical (ISW, redshift-space distortions) probes.
  • Accurate parallaxes from the Hipparcos catalog have enabled detailed studies of stellar properties. Subgiants are of particular interest because they lie in an area where isochrones are well separated, enabling dependable age determination. We have initiated a project to obtain hi-res spectra of Hipparcos subgiants in a volume-limited sample within 100 pc. We obtain stellar properties and abundances via fully automatic analysis. We will use our results to constrain star formation history and chemical evolution in the solar neighborhood. We present initial results for our observed sample and discuss future development for this project.
  • We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra of evolved Hipparcos stars within 100 parsec for detailed abundance analysis. We are particularly interested in subgiants because their ages can be derived accurately. Here, we present preliminary results for 10 subgiants and discuss the future work for this project. Our main scientific interest is to incorporate our results to constrain the star formation history in the solar neighborhood.
  • We present multi-color photometry and time resolved spectroscopy of OU Vir. The analysis of the quiescent light curve shows that OU Vir is characterized by i) strong cycle-to-cycle brightness variations, and ii) hot spot modulated light curve with grazing eclipse of the impact region. Colors are derived both in- and out- of eclipse. The time-resolved spectroscopy allows us to produce the radial velocity curve from the H$\alpha$ accretion disk emission line which possibly reveals only weak evidence for hot spot line emission. The hot spot is believed to be a turbulent optically thick region, producing mostly continuum emission.
  • We present early-time Keck spectroscopic observations and late-time Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of GRB 000926. The HST images show a small offset between the optical transient and the compact host galaxy. Combined with the large equivalent widths measured for metallic absorption lines by the Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager (ESI) and the Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS), this indicates that the GRB exploded near the center of its host. The ESI spectroscopy reveals two absorption systems centered at z = 2.0379 \pm 0.0008 with a velocity separation of 168 km s^{-1}, which we interpret as being due to individual clouds in the host galaxy. The ratios of chromium to zinc equivalent widths indicates the host is depleted in dust relative to local values to a similar degree as damped Lyman alpha systems at the same redshift. Further, the two clouds appear to have similar relative metal abundance and dust to gas ratio. If one cloud is associated with the GRB site, this implies the explosion did not significantly alter the surrounding environment.
  • We present multi-color light-curves of the optical afterglow of GRB 000926. Beginning ~1.5 days after the burst, the light-curves of this GRB steepen measurably. The existence of such achromatic breaks are usually taken to be an important observational signature that the ejecta are not expanding isotropically, but rather have a collimated jet-like geometry. If we interpret the data in this context, we derive an opening angle of 5 degrees, which reduces the energy release compared to an isotropic model by a factor of ~275, to 1.7 x 10^51 erg. To fit the data with a simple jet model requires extinction along the line of sight. The derived A_V is in the range 0.11 - 0.82 mag, depending on the adopted extinction law and whether the electrons giving rise to the optical emission are undergoing synchrotron cooling or not. Since this is in excess of the expected extinction from our Galaxy, we attribute this to the GRB host. We note that this extinction is typical of a galactic disk, and therefore the event likely took place in the disk of its host.