• NGC 3105 is a young open cluster hosting blue, yellow and red supergiants. This rare combination makes it an excellent laboratory to constrain evolutionary models of high-mass stars. It is poorly studied and fundamental parameters such as its age or distance are not well defined. We intend to characterize in an accurate way the cluster as well as its evolved stars, for which we derive for the first time atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances. We identify 126 B-type likely members within a radius of 2.7$\pm$0.6 arcmin, which implies an initial mass, $M_{cl}\approx$4100 M$_{\odot}$. We find a distance of 7.2$\pm$0.7 kpc for NGC 3105, placing it at $R_{GC}$=10.0$\pm$1.2 kpc. Isochrone fitting supports an age of 28$\pm$6 Ma, implying masses around 9.5 M$_{\odot}$ for the supergiants. A high fraction of Be stars ($\approx$25 %) is found at the top of the main sequence down to spectral type b3. From the spectral analysis we estimate for the cluster a $v_{rad}$=+46.9$\pm$0.9 km s$^{-1}$ and a low metallicity, [Fe/H]=-0.29$\pm$0.22. We also have determined, for the first time, chemical abundances for Li, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Ni, Rb, Y, and Ba for the evolved stars. The chemical composition of the cluster is consistent with that of the Galactic thin disc. An overabundance of Ba is found, supporting the enhanced $s$-process. NGC 3105 has a low metallicity for its Galactocentric distance, comparable to typical LMC stars. It is a valuable spiral tracer in a very distant region of the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm, a poorly known part of the Galaxy. As one of the few Galactic clusters containing blue, yellow and red supergiants, it is massive enough to serve as a testbed for theoretical evolutionary models close to the boundary between intermediate and high-mass stars.
  • NGC 6067 is a young open cluster hosting the largest population of evolved stars among known Milky Way clusters in the 50-150 Ma age range. It thus represents the best laboratory in our Galaxy to constrain the evolutionary tracks of 5-7 M$_{\odot}$ stars. We have used high-resolution spectra of a large sample of bright cluster members (45), combined with archival photometry, to obtain accurate parameters for the cluster as well as stellar atmospheric parameters. We derive a distance of 1.78$\pm$0.12 kpc, an age of 90$\pm$20 Ma and a tidal radius of 14.8$^{6.8}_{3.2}$ arcmin. We estimate an initial mass above 5700 M$_{\odot}$, for a present-day evolved population of two Cepheids, two A supergiants and 12 red giants with masses $\approx$6 M$_{\odot}$. We also determine chemical abundances of Li, O, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Ni, Rb, Y and Ba for the red clump stars. We find a supersolar metallicity, [Fe/H]=+0.19$\pm$0.05, and a homogeneus chemical composition, consistent with the Galactic metallicity gradient. The presence of a Li-rich red giant, star 276 with A(Li)=2.41, is also detected. An over-abundance of Ba is found, supporting the enhanced $s$-process. The ratio of yellow to red giants is much smaller than one, in agreement with models with moderate overshooting, but the properties of the cluster Cepheids do not seem consistent with current Padova models for supersolar metallicity.
  • NGC 7067 is a young open cluster located in the direction between the first and the second Galactic quadrants and close to the Perseus spiral arm. This makes it useful for studies of the nature of the Milky Way spiral arms. Stromgren photometry taken with the Wide Field Camera at the Isaac Newton Telescope allowed us to compute individual physical parameters for the observed stars and hence to derive cluster's physical parameters. Spectra from the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence helped to check and improve the results. We obtained photometry for 1233 stars, individual physical parameters for 515 and spectra for 9 of them. The 139 selected cluster members lead to a cluster distance of 4.4+/-0.4 kpc, with an age below log10(t(yr))=7.3 and a present Mass of 1260+/-160Msun. The morphology of the data reveals that the centre of the cluster is at (ra,dec)=(21:24:13.69,+48:00:39.2) J2000, with a radius of 6.1arcsec. Stromgren and spectroscopic data allowed us to improve the previous parameters available for the cluster in the literature.
  • Classical Supergiant X-ray Binaries (SGXBs) and Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are two types of High-mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) that present similar donors but, at the same time, show very different behavior in the X-rays. The reason for this dichotomy of wind-fed HMXBs is still a matter of debate. Among the several explanations that have been proposed, some of them invoke specific stellar wind properties of the donor stars. Only dedicated empiric analysis of the donors' stellar wind can provide the required information to accomplish an adequate test of these theories. However, such analyses are scarce. To close this gap, we perform a comparative analysis of the optical companion in two important systems: IGR J17544-2619 (SFXT) and Vela X-1 (SGXB). We analyse the spectra of each star in detail and derive their stellar and wind properties. We compare the wind parameters, giving us an excellent chance of recognizing key differences between donor winds in SFXTs and SGXBs. We find that the stellar parameters derived from the analysis generally agree well with the spectral types of the two donors: O9I (IGR J17544-2619) and B0.5Iae (Vela X-1). An important difference between the stellar winds of the two stars is their terminal velocities v_inf=1500km/s in IGR J17544-2619 and v_inf=700km/s in Vela~X-1, which has important consequences on the X-ray luminosity of these sources. Their specific combination of wind speed and pulsar spin favours an accretion regime with a persistently high luminosity in Vela X-1, while it favours an inhibiting accretion mechanism in IGR~J17544-2619. Our study demonstrates that the wind relative velocity is critical in the determination of the class of HMXBs hosting a supergiant donor, given that it may shift the accretion mechanism from direct accretion to propeller regimes when combined with other parameters.
  • Context: It appears that most (if not all) massive stars are born in multiple systems. At the same time, the most massive binaries are hard to find due to their low numbers throughout the Galaxy and the implied large distances and extinctions. AIMS: We want to study: [a] LS III +46 11, identified in this paper as a very massive binary; [b] another nearby massive system, LS III +46 12; and [c] the surrounding stellar cluster, Berkeley 90. Methods: Most of the data used in this paper are multi-epoch high-S/N optical spectra though we also use Lucky Imaging and archival photometry. The spectra are reduced with devoted pipelines and processed with our own software, such as a spectroscopic-orbit code, CHORIZOS, and MGB. Results: LS III +46 11 is identified as a new very-early-O-type spectroscopic binary [O3.5 If* + O3.5 If*] and LS III +46 12 as another early O-type system [O4.5 V((f))]. We measure a 97.2-day period for LS III +46 12 and derive minimum masses of 38.80$\pm$0.83 M_Sol and 35.60$\pm$0.77 M_Sol for its two stars. We measure the extinction to both stars, estimate the distance, search for optical companions, and study the surrounding cluster. In doing so, a variable extinction is found as well as discrepant results for the distance. We discuss possible explanations and suggest that LS III +46 12 may be a hidden binary system, where the companion is currently undetected.