• We present ALMA observations of the $^{12}$CO (2--1) line of the newly born ($t_\mathrm{radio}\sim10^2$ years) active galactic nucleus (AGN), PKS B1718-649. These observations reveal that the carbon monoxide in the innermost 15 kpc of the galaxy is distributed in a complex warped disk. In the outer parts of this disk, the CO gas follows the rotation of the dust lane and of the stellar body of the galaxy hosting the radio source. In the innermost kiloparsec, the gas abruptly changes orientation and forms a circumnuclear disk ($r\lesssim700$ pc) with its major axis perpendicular to that of the outer disk. Against the compact radio emission of PKS B1718-649 ($r\sim 2$ pc), we detect an absorption line at red-shifted velocities with respect to the systemic velocity ($\Delta v = +365\pm22$\kms). This absorbing CO gas could trace molecular clouds falling onto the central super-massive black hole. A comparison with the near-infra red H$_{\,2}$ 1-0 S(1) observations shows that the clouds must be close to the black hole ($r\lesssim 75$ pc). The physical conditions of these clouds are different from the gas at larger radii, and are in good agreement with the predictions for the conditions of the gas when cold chaotic accretion triggers an active galactic nucleus. These observations on the centre of PKS B1718-649 provide one of the best indications that a population of cold clouds is falling towards a radio AGN, likely fuelling its activity.
  • We present the results from ALMA observations centred $40^{\prime\prime}$ (3 kpc in projection) southeast of the nucleus of M87. We report the detection of extended CO (2-1) line emission with a total flux of $(5.5 \pm 0.6) \times 10^{-18}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and corresponding molecular gas mass $M_{H_2}=(4.7 \pm 0.4) \times 10^5 M_\odot$, assuming a Galactic CO to H$_2$ conversion factor. ALMA data indicate a line-of-sight velocity of $-129\pm3$ km s$^{-1}$, in good agreement with measurements based on the [CII] and H$\alpha$+[NII] lines, and a velocity dispersion of $\sigma=27\pm3$ km s$^{-1}$. The CO(2-1) emission originates only outside the radio lobe of the AGN seen in the 6~cm VLA image, while the filament prolongs further inwards at other wavelengths. The molecular gas in M87 appears to be destroyed or excited by AGN activity, either by direct interaction with the radio plasma, or by the shock driven by the lobe into the X-ray emitting atmosphere. This is an important piece of the puzzle in understanding the impact of the central AGN on the amount of the coldest gas from which star formation can proceed.
  • We present a study of carbon radio recombination lines towards Cassiopeia A using LOFAR observations in the frequency range 10-33 MHz. Individual carbon $\alpha$ lines are detected in absorption against the continuum at frequencies as low as 16 MHz. Stacking several C$\alpha$ lines we obtain detections in the 11-16 MHz range. These are the highest signal-to-noise measurements at these frequencies. The peak optical depth of the C$\alpha$ lines changes considerably over the 11-33 MHz range with the peak optical depth decreasing from 4$\times10^{-3}$ at 33 MHz to 2$\times10^{-3}$ at 11 MHz, while the line width increases from 20 km s$^{-1}$ to 150 km s$^{-1}$. The combined change in peak optical depth and line width results in a roughly constant integrated optical depth. We interpret this as carbon atoms close to local thermodynamic equilibrium. In this work we focus on how the 11-33 MHz carbon radio recombination lines can be used to determine the gas physical conditions. We find that the ratio of the carbon radio recombination lines to that of the 158 $\mu$m [CII] fine-structure line is a good thermometer, while the ratio between low frequency carbon radio recombination lines provides a good barometer. By combining the temperature and pressure constraints with those derived from the line width we are able to constrain the gas properties (electron temperature and density) and radiation field intensity. Given the 1$\sigma$ uncertainties in our measurements these are; $T_{e}\approx68$-$98$ K, $n_{e}\approx0.02$-$0.035$ cm$^{-3}$ and $T_{r,100}\approx1500$-$1650$ K. Despite challenging RFI and ionospheric conditions, our work demonstrates that observations of carbon radio recombination lines in the 10-33 MHz range can provide insight into the gas conditions.
  • The LOFAR Two-metre Sky Survey (LoTSS) is a deep 120-168 MHz imaging survey that will eventually cover the entire Northern sky. Each of the 3170 pointings will be observed for 8 hrs, which, at most declinations, is sufficient to produce ~5arcsec resolution images with a sensitivity of ~0.1mJy/beam and accomplish the main scientific aims of the survey which are to explore the formation and evolution of massive black holes, galaxies, clusters of galaxies and large-scale structure. Due to the compact core and long baselines of LOFAR, the images provide excellent sensitivity to both highly extended and compact emission. For legacy value, the data are archived at high spectral and time resolution to facilitate subarcsecond imaging and spectral line studies. In this paper we provide an overview of the LoTSS. We outline the survey strategy, the observational status, the current calibration techniques, a preliminary data release, and the anticipated scientific impact. The preliminary images that we have released were created using a fully-automated but direction-independent calibration strategy and are significantly more sensitive than those produced by any existing large-area low-frequency survey. In excess of 44,000 sources are detected in the images that have a resolution of 25arcsec, typical noise levels of less than 0.5 mJy/beam, and cover an area of over 350 square degrees in the region of the HETDEX Spring Field (right ascension 10h45m00s to 15h30m00s and declination 45d00m00s to 57d00m00s).
  • We use the Low Frequency Array to perform a systematic high spectral resolution investigation of the low-frequency 33-78 MHz spectrum along the line of sight to Cassiopeia A. We complement this with a 304-386 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio telescope observation. In this first paper we focus on the carbon radio recombination lines. We detect Cn$\alpha$ lines at -47 and -38 km s$^{-1}$ in absorption for quantum numbers n=438-584 and in emission for n=257-278 with high signal to noise. These lines are associated with cold clouds in the Perseus spiral arm component. Hn$\alpha$ lines are detected in emission for n=257-278. In addition, we also detect Cn$\alpha$ lines at 0 km s$^{-1}$ associated with the Orion arm. We analyze the optical depth of these transitions and their line width. Our models show that the carbon line components in the Perseus arm are best fit with an electron temperature 85 K and an electron density 0.04 cm$^{-3}$ and can be constrained to within 15\%. The electron pressure is constrained to within 20\%. We argue that much of these carbon radio recombination lines arise in the CO-dark surface layers of molecular clouds where most of the carbon is ionized but hydrogen has made the transition from atomic to molecular. The hydrogen lines are clearly associated with the carbon line emitting clouds, but the low-frequency upperlimits indicate that they likely do not trace the same gas. Combining the hydrogen and carbon results we arrive at a firm lower limit to the cosmic ray ionization rate of 2.5$\times$10$^{-18}$ s$^{-1}$, but the actual value is likely much larger.
  • Using CO (4-3) and (2-1) Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) data, we prove that the molecular gas in the jet-driven winds of the galaxy IC5063 is more highly excited than the rest of the molecular gas in the disk of the same galaxy. On average, the CO(4-3)/CO(2-1) flux ratio is 1 for the disk and 5 for the jet accelerated or impacted gas. Spatially-resolved maps reveal that in regions associated with winds, the CO(4-3)/CO(2-1) flux ratio significantly exceeds the upper limit of 4 for optically thick gas. It frequently takes values between 5 and 11, and it occasionally further approaches the upper limit of 16 for optically thin gas. Excitation temperatures of 30-100 K are common for the molecules in these regions. If all of the outflowing molecular gas is optically thin, at 30-50 K, then its mass is 2*10^6 M_sun. This lower mass limit is an order of magnitude below the mass derived from the CO(2-1) flux in the case of optically thick gas. Molecular winds can thus be less massive, but more easily detectable at high z than they were previously thought to be.
  • We present ALMA CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the 2A 0335+096 galaxy cluster (z = 0.0346). The total molecular gas mass of (1.13+/-0.15) x 10^9 M_sun is divided into two components: a nuclear region and a 7 kpc long dusty filament. The central molecular gas component accounts for (3.2+/-0.4) x 10^8 M_sun of the total supply of cold gas. Instead of forming a rotationally-supported ring or disk, it is composed of two distinct, blueshifted clumps south of the nucleus and a series of low-significance redshifted clumps extending toward a nearby companion galaxy. The velocity of the redshifted clouds increases with radius to a value consistent with the companion galaxy, suggesting that an interaction between these galaxies <20 Myr ago disrupted a pre-existing molecular gas reservoir within the BCG. Most of the molecular gas, (7.8+/-0.9) x 10^8 M_sun, is located in the filament. The CO emission is co-spatial with a 10^4 K emission-line nebula and soft X-rays from 0.5 keV gas, indicating that the molecular gas has cooled out of the intracluster medium over a period of 25-100 Myr. The filament trails an X-ray cavity, suggesting that the gas has cooled from low entropy gas that has been lifted out of the cluster core and become thermally unstable. We are unable to distinguish between inflow and outflow along the filament with the present data. Cloud velocities along the filament are consistent with gravitational free-fall near the plane of the sky, although their increasing blueshifts with radius are consistent with outflow.
  • In the first paper of this series, we study the level population problem of recombining carbon ions. We focus our study on high quantum numbers anticipating observations of Carbon Radio Recombination Lines to be carried out by the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We solve the level population equation including angular momentum levels with updated collision rates up to high principal quantum numbers. We derive departure coefficients by solving the level population equation in the hydrogenic approximation and including low temperature dielectronic recombination effects. Our results in the hydrogenic approximation agree well with those of previous works. When comparing our results including dielectronic recombination we find differences which we ascribe to updates in the atomic physics (e.g., collision rates) and to the approximate solution method of the statistical equilibrium equations adopted in previous studies. A comparison with observations is discussed in an accompanying article, as radiative transfer effects need to be considered.
  • In the second paper of the series, we have modeled low frequency carbon radio recombination lines (CRRL) from the interstellar medium. Anticipating the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) survey of Galactic CRRLs, we focus our study on the physical conditions of the diffuse cold neutral medium (CNM). We have used the improved departure coefficients computed in the first paper of the series to calculate line-to-continuum ratios. The results show that the line width and integrated optical depths of CRRL are sensitive probes of the electron density, gas temperature, and the emission measure of the cloud. Furthermore, the ratio of CRRL to the [CII] at 158 $\mu$m line is a strong function of the temperature and density of diffuse clouds. Guided by our calculations, we analyze CRRL observations and illustrate their use with data from the literature.
  • The correlation between radio spectral index and redshift has been exploited to discover high redshift radio galaxies, but its underlying cause is unclear. It is crucial to characterise the particle acceleration and loss mechanisms in high redshift radio galaxies to understand why their radio spectral indices are steeper than their local counterparts. Low frequency information on scales of $\sim$1 arcsec are necessary to determine the internal spectral index variation. In this paper we present the first spatially resolved studies at frequencies below 100 MHz of the $z = 2.4$ radio galaxy 4C 43.15 which was selected based on its ultra-steep spectral index ($\alpha < -1$; $S_{\nu} \sim \nu^{\alpha}$ ) between 365 MHz and 1.4 GHz. Using the International Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band Antenna we achieve sub-arcsecond imaging resolution at 55 MHz with VLBI techniques. Our study reveals low-frequency radio emission extended along the jet axis, which connects the two lobes. The integrated spectral index for frequencies $<$ 500 MHz is -0.83. The lobes have integrated spectral indices of -1.31$\pm$0.03 and -1.75$\pm$0.01 for frequencies $\geq$1.4 GHz, implying a break frequency between 500 MHz and 1.4 GHz. These spectral properties are similar to those of local radio galaxies. We conclude that the initially measured ultra-steep spectral index is due to a combination of the steepening spectrum at high frequencies with a break at intermediate frequencies.
  • We present a detailed study of the complex ionization structure in a small (~250 pc) extended narrow line region (ENLR) cloud near Centaurus A using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer. This cloud is located in the so-called outer filament of ionized gas (about 15 kpc from the nucleus) where jet-induced star formation has been suggested to occur by different studies. We find that, despite the small size, a mixture of ionization mechanisms is operating, resulting in considerable complexity in the spatial ionization structure. The area includes two H II regions where star formation is occurring and another location where star formation must have ceased very recently. Interestingly, the extreme Balmer decrement of one of the star forming regions (H_alpha/H_beta~6) indicates that it is still heavily embedded in its natal cocoon of gas and dust. At all three locations a continuum counterpart is found with spectra matching those of O/B stars local to Centaurus A. The H II regions are embedded in a larger gas complex which is photoionized by the radiation of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the O/B stars affect the spatial ionization pattern in the ENLR cloud very locally. In particular, in the surroundings of the youngest star forming region, we can isolate a tight mixing sequence in the diagnostic diagram going from gas with ionization due to a pure stellar continuum to gas only photoionized by the AGN. These results emphasize the complexity and the mixture of processes occurring in star forming regions under the influence of an AGN radiation. This is relevant for our understanding of AGN-induced star formation suggested to occur in a number of objects, including this region of Centaurus A. They also illustrate that these young stars influence the gas over only a limited region.
  • We present new SINFONI VLT observations of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the central regions (< 2.5 kpc) of the youngest and closest radio source PKS B1718-649. We study the distribution of the H2 traced by the 1-0 S(1) ro-vibrational line, revealing a double disk structure with the kinematics of both disks characterised by rotation. An outer disk (r > 650 pc) is aligned with other components of the galaxy (atomic hydrogen, stars, dust), while the inner disk (r< 600 pc) is perpendicular to it and is polar with respect to the stellar distribution. However, in the innermost 75 pc, the data show the presence of H2 gas redshifted with respect to the rotating inner disk ($\Delta v\,$+150 km/s) which may trace gas falling into the super-massive black hole associated with the central radio source. Along the same line of sight, earlier observations had shown the presence in the central regions of PKS B1718-649 of clouds of atomic hydrogen with similar unsettled kinematics. The range of velocities and mass of these unsettled clouds of HI and H2 suggest they may be actively contributing in fuelling the central newly-born radio source.
  • The interaction between the radio plasma ejected by the active nucleus of a galaxy and the surrounding medium is a key process that can have a strong impact on the interstellar medium of the galaxy and hence on galaxy evolution. The closest laboratory where we can observe and investigate this phenomenon is the radio galaxy Centaurus A. About 15 kpc north-east of this galaxy, a particularly complex region is found: the so-called Outer Filament where jet-cloud interactions have been proposed to occur. We investigate the presence of signatures of jet-ISM interaction by a detailed study of the kinematics of the ionized gas, expanding on previous results obtained from the HI. We observed two regions of the outer filament with VLT/VIMOS in the IFU observing mode. Emission from Hbeta and [OIII]4959,5007\AA\ is detected in both pointings. We found two distinct kinematical components of ionized gas that well match the kinematics of the nearby HI cloud. One component follows the regular kinematics of the rotating gas while the second shows similar velocities to those of the nearby HI component thought to be disturbed by an interaction with the radio jet. We suggest that the ionized and atomic gas are part of the same dynamical gas structure originating as result of the merger that shaped Centaurus A and which is regularly rotating around Centaurus A as proposed by other authors. The gas (ionized and HI) with anomalous velocities is tracing the interaction of the Large-Scale radio Jet with the ISM, suggesting that, although poorly collimated as structure, the jet is still active. However, we can exclude that a strong shock is driving the ionization of the gas. It is likely that a combination of jet entrainment and photoionization by the UV continuum from the central engine is needed in order to explain both the ionization and the kinematics of the gas in the Outer Filament.
  • We present neutral hydrogen (HI) and warm molecular hydrogen (H2) observations of the young (10^2 years) radio galaxy PKS B1718-649. We study the morphology and the kinematics of both gas components, focusing, in particular, on their properties in relation to the triggering of the radio activity. The regular kinematics of the large scale HI disk, seen in emission, suggests that an interaction event occurred too long ago to be responsible for the recent triggering of the radio activity. In absorption, we detect two absorption lines along the narrow line of sight of the compact (r<2 pc) radio source. The lines trace two clouds with opposite radial motions. These may represent a population of clouds in the very inner regions of the galaxy, which may be involved in triggering the radio activity. The warm molecular hydrogen (H2 1-0 S(1) ro-vibrational line) in the innermost kilo-parsec of the galaxy appears to be distributed in a circum-nuclear disk following the regular kinematics of the HI and of the stellar component. An exception to this behaviour arises only in the very centre, where a highly dispersed component is detected. These particular HI and H2 features suggest that a strong interplay between the radio source and the surrounding ISM is on-going. The physical properties of the cold gas in the proximity of the radio source may regulate the accretion recently triggered in this AGN.
  • We use high-resolution (0.5 arcsec) CO(2-1) observations performed with ALMA to trace the kinematics of the molecular gas in the Seyfert 2 galaxy IC5063. A fast outflow of molecular gas extends along the entire radio jet, with the highest outflow velocities about 0.5kpc from the nucleus, at the location of the brighter hot-spot in the W lobe. The data show that a massive, fast outflow with velocities up to 650 km/s of cold molecular gas is present, in addition to one detected earlier in warm H2, HI and ionised gas. Both the central AGN and the radio jet could energetically drive the outflow. However, the characteristics of the outflowing gas point to the radio jet being the main driver. This is important, because IC5063, although one of the most powerful Seyfert galaxies, is a relatively weak radio source (P = 3x10^23 W/Hz). All the observed characteristics can be described by a scenario of a radio plasma jet expanding into a clumpy medium, interacting directly with the clouds and inflating a cocoon that drives a lateral outflow into the interstellar medium. This model is consistent with results obtained by recent simulations such as those of Wagner et al.. A stronger, direct interaction between the jet and a gas cloud is present at the location of the brighter W lobe. Even assuming the most conservative values for the conversion factor CO-to-H2, the mass of the outflowing gas is between 1.9 and 4.8x10^7 Msun. These amounts are much larger than those of the outflow of warm gas (molecular and ionized) and somewhat larger than of the HI outflow. This suggests that most of the observed cold molecular outflow is due to fast cooling after being shocked. This gas is the end product of the cooling process. Our CO observations demonstrate that fast outflows of molecular gas can be driven by relativistic jets.
  • High-resolution (0.5 arcsec) CO(2-1) observations performed with the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array have been used to trace the kinematics of the molecular gas in the Seyfert 2 galaxy{IC~5063}. Although one of the most radio-loud Seyfert galaxy, IC~5063 is a relatively weak radio source (P_1.4GHz = 3 x 10^23 W Hz^-1). The data reveal that the kinematics of the gas is very complex. A fast outflow of molecular gas extends along the entire radio jet (~ 1 kpc), with the highest outflow velocities about 0.5 kpc from the nucleus, at the location of the brighter hot-spot in the W lobe. All the observed characteristics can be described by a scenario of a radio plasma jet expanding into a clumpy medium, interacting directly with the clouds and inflating a cocoon that drives a lateral outflow into the interstellar medium. This suggests that most of the observed cold molecular outflow is due to fast cooling of the gas after the passage of a shock and that it is the end product of the cooling process.
  • The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will transform our understanding of the role of the cold, atomic gas in galaxy evolution. The interstellar medium (ISM) is the repository of stellar ejecta and the birthsite of new stars and, hence, a key factor in the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Cold, diffuse, atomic clouds are a key component of the ISM, but so far this phase has been difficult to study, because its main tracer, the HI 21 cm line, does not constrain the basic physical information of the gas (e.g., temperature, density) well. The SKA opens up the opportunity to study this component of the ISM through a complementary tracer in the form of low-frequency (<350 MHz) carbon radio recombination lines (CRRL). These CRRLs provide a sensitive probe of the physical conditions in cold, diffuse clouds. The superb sensitivity, large field of view, frequency resolution and coverage of the SKA allows for efficient surveys of the sky, that will revolutionize the field of low-frequency recombination line studies. By observing these lines with the SKA we will be able determine the thermal balance, chemical enrichment, and ionization rate of the cold, atomic medium from degree-scales down to scales corresponding to individual clouds and filaments in our Galaxy, the Magellanic Clouds and beyond. Furthermore, being sensitive only to the cold, atomic gas, observations of low-frequency CRRLs with the SKA will aid in disentangling the warm and cold constituents of the HI 21 cm emission.
  • While the cooling of the hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) in the cores of galaxy clusters is mostly counteracted by heating from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), the balance is not perfect. This can lead to residual cooling flows and low-level star formation, the physics of which is not well understood. Here we present a detailed study of the residual cooling flow in the center of the low mass galaxy cluster Sersic 159-03 (A S1101) using far-ultraviolet imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope and far-infrared (FIR) spectroscopy and photometry from the Herschel space observatory, along with a wealth of archival data. We detect extended emission at UV, FIR, and [CII], indicating a star formation rate of ~1-3 Msun/yr, depending on the indicator and assumptions made. The most recently formed stars appear spatially coincident with the lowest entropy ICM. We speculate that this low-entropy gas has been displaced by the central AGN ~7.5 kpc north of the cD galaxy. These data demonstrate that the displacement of the cooling core from the direct vicinity of the central AGN can temporarily break the feedback cycle and lead to cooling and star formation that is offset from the center of the galaxy. We find an abundance (~10^7 Msun) of cold (20K) dust in the center of the cluster and a second FIR peak ~30kpc to the north of the central galaxy. If confirmed to be associated with the cooling filaments, this would be the most extended complex of dust yet found in a cool core cluster.
  • Sept. 18, 2014 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.GA
    We present LOFAR Low Band observations of the Bootes and 3C295 fields. Our images made at 34, 46, and 62 MHz reach noise levels of 12, 8, and 5 mJy beam$^{-1}$, making them the deepest images ever obtained in this frequency range. In total, we detect between 300 and 400 sources in each of these images, covering an area of 17 to 52 deg$^{2}$. From the observations we derive Euclidean-normalized differential source counts. The 62 MHz source counts agree with previous GMRT 153 MHz and VLA 74 MHz differential source counts, scaling with a spectral index of $-0.7$. We find that a spectral index scaling of $-0.5$ is required to match up the LOFAR 34 MHz source counts. This result is also in agreement with source counts from the 38 MHz 8C survey, indicating that the average spectral index of radio sources flattens towards lower frequencies. We also find evidence for spectral flattening using the individual flux measurements of sources between 34 and 1400 MHz and by calculating the spectral index averaged over the source population. To select ultra-steep spectrum ($\alpha < -1.1$) radio sources, that could be associated with massive high redshift radio galaxies, we compute spectral indices between 62 MHz, 153 MHz and 1.4 GHz for sources in the Bo\"otes field. We cross-correlate these radio sources with optical and infrared catalogues and fit the spectral energy distribution to obtain photometric redshifts. We find that most of these ultra-steep spectrum sources are located in the $ 0.7 \lesssim z \lesssim 2.5$ range.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the interstellar medium in eight nearby, X-ray and optically bright, giant elliptical galaxies. Using Herschel PACS, we map the cold gas in the lines of [CII], [OI], and [OIb]. Additionally, we present Ha+[NII] imaging of warm ionized gas with the SOAR telescope, and a study of the hot X-ray emitting plasma with Chandra. All systems with extended Ha emission in our sample (6/8 galaxies) display significant [CII] line emission indicating the presence of cold gas. This emission is co-spatial with the Ha+[NII] emitting nebulae and the lowest entropy X-ray emitting plasma. The entropy profiles of the hot galactic atmospheres show a clear dichotomy, with the systems displaying extended emission line nebulae having lower entropies beyond r~1 kpc than the cold-gas-poor systems. We show that while the hot atmospheres of the cold-gas-poor galaxies are thermally stable outside of their innermost cores, the atmospheres of the cold-gas-rich systems are prone to cooling instabilities. This result indicates that the cold gas is produced chiefly by thermally unstable cooling from the hot phase. We show that cooling instabilities may develop more easily in rotating systems and discuss an alternative condition for thermal instability for this case. The hot atmospheres of cold-gas-rich galaxies display disturbed morphologies indicating that the accretion of clumpy multiphase gas in these systems may result in variable power output of the AGN jets, potentially triggering sporadic, larger outbursts. In the two cold-gas-poor, X-ray morphologically relaxed galaxies of our sample, NGC 1399 and NGC 4472, powerful AGN outbursts may have destroyed or removed most of the cold gas from the cores, allowing the jets to propagate and deposit most of their energy further out, increasing the entropy of the hot galactic atmospheres and leaving their cores relatively undisturbed.
  • We present multi-frequency observations of the radio galaxy Hydra-A (3C218) located in the core of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster. IFU spectroscopy is used to trace the kinematics of the ionised and warm molecular hydrogen which are consistent with a ~ 5 kpc rotating disc. Broad, double-peaked lines of CO(2-1), [CII]157 $\mu$m and [OI]63 $\mu$m are detected. We estimate the mass of the cold gas within the disc to be M$_{gas}$ = 2.3 $\pm$ 0.3 x 10$^9$ M$_{\odot}$. These observations demonstrate that the complex line profiles found in the cold atomic and molecular gas are related to the rotating disc or ring of gas. Finally, an HST image of the galaxy shows that this gas disc contains a substantial mass of dust. The large gas mass, SFR and kinematics are consistent with the levels of gas cooling from the ICM. We conclude that the cold gas originates from the continual quiescent accumulation of cooled ICM gas. The rotation is in a plane perpendicular to the projected orientation of the radio jets and ICM cavities hinting at a possible connection between the kpc-scale cooling gas and the accretion of material onto the black hole. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of cold accretion, AGN feedback and cooling flows.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the emission-line nebulae located southeast of the nucleus of M87, the central dominant galaxy of the Virgo Cluster. We report the detection of far-infrared (FIR) [CII] line emission from the nebulae using observations made with Herschel PACS. The infrared line emission is extended and cospatial with optical H{\alpha}+[NII], far-ultraviolet CIV lines, and soft X-ray emission. The filamentary nebulae evidently contain multi-phase material spanning a temperature range of at least 5 orders of magnitude, from ~100 K to ~10^7 K. This material has most likely been uplifted by the AGN from the center of M87. The thermal pressure of the 10^4 K phase appears to be significantly lower than that of the surrounding hot intra-cluster medium (ICM) indicating the presence of additional turbulent and magnetic pressure in the filaments. If the turbulence in the filaments is subsonic then the magnetic field strength required to balance the pressure of the surrounding ICM is B~30-70 {\mu}G. The spectral properties of the soft X-ray emission from the filaments indicate that it is due to thermal plasma with kT~0.5-1 keV, which is cooling by mixing with the cold gas and/or radiatively. Charge exchange can be ruled out as a significant source of soft X-rays. Both cooling and mixing scenarios predict gas with a range of temperatures. This is at first glance inconsistent with the apparent lack of X-ray emitting gas with kT<0.5 keV. However, we show that the missing very soft X-ray emission could be absorbed by the cold gas in the filaments with an integrated hydrogen column density of ~1.6x10^21 cm^-2, providing a natural explanation for the apparent temperature floor to the X-ray emission at kT~0.5 keV. The FIR through ultra-violet line emission is most likely primarily powered by the ICM particles penetrating the cold gas following a shearing induced mixing process.
  • Some merging galaxy clusters host diffuse extended radio emission, so-called radio halos and relics. Here we present observations between 147 MHz and 4.9 GHz of a new radio-selected galaxy cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214 (z=0.225). The cluster is also detected as an extended X-ray source in the RASS. It hosts a large bright 1.9 Mpc radio relic, an elongated ~2 Mpc radio halo, and two smaller radio relics. The large radio relic has a peculiar linear morphology. For this relic we observe a clear spectral index gradient, in the direction towards the cluster center. We performed Rotation Measure (RM) Synthesis between 1.2 and 1.7 GHz. The results suggest that for the west part of the large relic some of the Faraday rotation is caused by ICM and is not only due to galactic foregrounds. We also carried out a detailed spectral analysis of this radio relic and created radio color-color diagrams. We find (i) an injection spectral index of -0.6 to -0.7, (ii) steepening spectral index and increasing spectral curvature in the post-shock region, and (iii) an overall power-law spectrum between 74 MHz and 4.9 GHz with \alpha=-1.10 \pm 0.02. Mixing of emission in the beam from regions with different spectral ages is probably the dominant factor that determines the shape of the radio spectra. Changes in the magnetic field, total electron content, or adiabatic gains/losses do not play a major role. A model in which particles are (re)accelerated in a first order Fermi process at the front of the relic provides the best match to the observed spectra. We speculate that in the post-shock region particles are re-accelerated by merger induced turbulence to form the radio halo as the relic and halo are connected. The 1RXS J0603.3+4214 merger is probably more complex than the "simple'" binary merger events that are thought to give rise to symmetric double radio relics.
  • IRAS 09104+4109 is a rare example of a dust enshrouded type 2 QSO in the centre of a cool-core galaxy cluster. Previous observations of this z=0.44 system showed that as well as powering the hyper-luminous infrared emission of the cluster-central galaxy, the QSO is associated with a double-lobed radio source. However, the steep radio spectral index and misalignment between the jets and ionised optical emission suggested that the orientation of the QSO had recently changed. We use a combination of new, multi-band Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations and archival radio data to confirm that the jets are no longer powered by the QSO, and estimate their age to be 120-160 Myr. This is in agreement with the ~70-200 Myr age previously estimated for star-formation in the galaxy. Previously unpublished Very Long Baseline Array data reveal a 200 pc scale double radio source in the galaxy core which is more closely aligned with the current QSO axis and may represent a more recent period of jet activity. These results suggest that the realignment of the QSO, the cessation of jet activity, and the onset of rapid star-formation may have been caused by a gas-rich galaxy merger. A Chandra X-ray observation confirms the presence of cavities associated with the radio jets, and we estimate the energy required to inflate them to be ~7.7x10^60 erg. The mechanical power of the jets is sufficient to balance radiative cooling in the cluster, provided they are efficiently coupled to the intra-cluster medium (ICM). We find no evidence of direct radiative heating and conclude that the QSO either lacks the radiative luminosity to heat the ICM, or that it requires longer than 100-200 Myr to significantly impact its environment. [Abridged]
  • New Chandra X-ray and Herschel FIR observations enable a multiwavelength study of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating and intracluster medium (ICM) cooling in the brightest cluster galaxy of Abell 2597. The new Chandra observations reveal the central < 30 kiloparsec X-ray cavity network to be more extensive than previously thought, and associated with enough enthalpy to theoretically inhibit the inferred classical cooling flow. Nevertheless, we present new evidence, consistent with previous results, that a moderately strong residual cooling flow is persisting at 4%-8% of the classically predicted rates in a spatially structured manner amid the feedback-driven excavation of the X-ray cavity network. New Herschel observations are used to estimate warm and cold dust masses, a lower-limit gas-to-dust ratio, and a star formation rate consistent with previous measurements. The cooling time profile of the ambient X-ray atmosphere is used to map the locations of the observational star formation entropy threshold as well as the theoretical thermal instability threshold. Both lie just outside the < 30 kpc central region permeated by X-ray cavities, and star formation as well as ionized and molecular gas lie interior to both. The young stars are distributed in an elongated region that is aligned with the radio lobes, and their estimated ages are both younger and older than the X-ray cavity network, suggesting both jet-triggered as well as persistent star formation over the current AGN feedback episode. Bright X-ray knots that are coincident with extended Ly-alpha and FUV continuum filaments motivate a discussion of structured cooling from the ambient hot atmosphere along a projected axis that is perpendicular to X-ray cavity and radio axis. We conclude that the cooling ICM is the dominant contributor of the cold gas reservoir fueling star formation and AGN activity in the Abell 2597 BCG.