• A possible route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution is to employ recolliding electrons as `probes'. The recollision process in molecules is, however, very challenging to treat using {\it ab initio} approaches. Even for the simplest diatomic systems, such as H$_2$, today's computational capabilities are not enough to give a complete description of the electron and nuclear dynamics initiated by a strong laser field. As a consequence, approximate qualitative descriptions are called to play an important role. In this contribution we extend the work presented in N. Su\'arez {\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev. A {\bf 95}, 033415 (2017), to three-center molecular targets. Additionally, we incorporate a more accurate description of the molecular ground state, employing information extracted from quantum chemistry software packages. This step forward allows us to include, in a detailed way, both the molecular symmetries and nodes present in the high-occupied molecular orbital. We are able to, on the one hand, keep our formulation as analytical as in the case of diatomics, and, on the other hand, to still give a complete description of the underlying physics behind the above-threshold ionization process. The application of our approach to complex multicenter - with more than 3 centers, targets appears to be straightforward.
  • Strong field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an {\em ab-initio} treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach we obtain expressions for electrons emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centres, and accelerated then in the strong laser field. One innovative aspect of our theory is the fact that the dipole matrix elements are free from non-physical gauge and coordinate system dependent terms -- this is achieved by adapting the coordinate system, in which SFA is performed, to the centre from which the corresponding part of the time dependent wave function originates. Our analytic results agree very well with the numerical solution of the full three-dimensional TDSE for the H$_2^+$ molecule. Moreover, the theoretical model was applied to describe laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) measurements of O$_2^+$ molecules, obtained at ICFO, and reproduces the main features of the experiment very well. Our approach can be extended in a natural way to more complex molecules and multi-electron systems.
  • The ability to directly follow and time resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as {\pi}g) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with {\pi}g and {\pi}u symmetries, respectively, and where their ionisation probabilities do not maximise along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong back scattering contributions from low-Z atoms.
  • Attosecond light pulses in the extreme ultraviolet have drawn a great deal of attention due to their ability to interrogate electronic dynamics in real time. Nevertheless, to follow charge dynamics and excitations in materials, element selectivity is a prerequisite, which demands such pulses in the soft X-ray region, above 200 eV, to simultaneously cover several fundamental absorption edges of the constituents of the materials. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the exploitation of a transient phase matching regime to generate carrier envelope controlled soft X-ray supercontinua with pulse energies up to 2.9 +/- 0.1 pJ and a flux of (7.3 +/- 0.1)x10^7 photons/s across the entire water window and attosecond pulses with 13 as transform limit. Our results herald attosecond science at the fundamental absorption edges of matter by bridging the gap between ultrafast temporal resolution and element specific probing.
  • Ionization of an atom or molecule presents surprising richness beyond our current understanding: strong-field ionization with low-frequency fields recently revealed unexpected kinetic energy structures (1, 2). A solid grasp on electron dynamics is however pre-requisite for attosecond-resolution recollision imaging (3), orbital tomography (4), for coherent sources of keV light (5), or to produce zeptosecond-duration x-rays (6). We present a methodology that enables scrutinizing strong-field dynamics at an unprecedented level. Our method provides high-precision measurements only 1 meV above the threshold despite 5 orders higher ponderomotive energies. Such feat was realized with a specifically developed ultrafast mid-IR light source in combination with a reaction microscope. We observe electron dynamics in the tunneling regime ({\gamma} = 0.3) and show first 3D momentum distributions demonstrating surprising new observations of near-zero momentum electrons and low momentum structures, below the eV, despite quiver energies of 95 eV.
  • We present theoretical studies of above threshold ionization (ATI) produced by spatially inhomogeneous fields. This kind of field appears as a result of the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures and metal nanoparticles with a short laser pulse. We use the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE) in reduced dimensions to understand and characterize the ATI features in these fields. It is demonstrated that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role in the ATI process and it produces appreciable modifications to the energy-resolved photoelectron spectra. In fact, our numerical simulations reveal that high energy electrons can be generated. Specifically, using a linear approximation for the spatial dependence of the enhanced plasmonic field and with a near infrared laser with intensities in the mid- 10^{14} W/cm^{2} range, we show it is possible to drive electrons with energies in the near-keV regime. Furthermore, we study how the carrier envelope phase influences the emission of ATI photoelectrons for few-cycle pulses. Our quantum mechanical calculations are supported by their classical counterparts.
  • We study high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures with a short laser pulse. We show that both the inhomogeneities of the local electric field and the confinement of the electron motion play an important role in the HHG process and lead to a significant increase of the harmonic cutoff. In order to understand and characterize this feature, we combine the numerical solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) with the electric fields obtained from 3D finite element simulations. We employ time-frequency analysis to extract more detailed information from the TDSE results and to explain the extended harmonic spectra. Our findings have the potential to boost up the utilization of HHG as coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources.
  • We present theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) produced by non-homogeneous fields as resulting from the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures with a short laser pulse. We show that both the inhomogeneity of the local fields and the confinement of the electron movement play an important role in the HHG process and lead to the generation of even harmonics and a significantly increased cutoff, more pronounced for the longer wavelengths cases studied. In order to understand and characterize the new HHG features we employ two different approaches: the numerical solution of the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE) and the semiclassical approach known as Strong Field Approximation (SFA). Both approaches predict comparable results and show the new features, but using the semiclassical arguments behind the SFA and time-frequency analysis tools, we are able to fully understand the reasons of the cutoff extension.
  • In supercontinuum generation, various propa- gation effects combine to produce a dramatic spec- tral broadening of intense ultrashort optical pulses with far reaching possibilities. Different applications place highly divergent and challenging demands on source characteristics such as spectral coverage from the ultraviolet (UV) across the visible (VIS) to the near-infrared (NIR), and into the mid-infrared (MIR). Shot-to-shot repeatability, high spectral energy density, an absence of complicated or non-deterministic pulse splitting are also essential for many applications. Here we present an "all in one" solution with the first supercontinuum in bulk covering the broad- est bandwidth from just above UV far into the MIR. The spectrum spans more than three octaves, carries high spectral energy density (3pJ up to 10 nJ per nanometer), has high shot-to-shot reproducibility, and is carrier-to-envelope phase (CEP) stable. Our method, based on filamentation of a femtosecond MIR pulse in the anoma- lous dispersion regime, allows for a new class of simple and compact supercontinuum sources.
  • A coherent control scheme for the population distribution in the vibrational states of nonpolar molecules is proposed. Our theoretical analysis and results of numerical simulations for the interaction of the hydrogen molecular ion in its electronic ground state with an infrared laser pulse reveal a selective two-photon transition between the vibrational states via a coupling with the first excited dissociative state. We demonstrate that for a given temporal intensity profile the population transfer between vibrational states, or a superposition of vibrational states, can be made complete for a single chirped pulse or a train of chirped pulses, which accounts for the accumulated phase difference due to the AC Stark effect. Effects of a spatial intensity (or, focal) averaging are discussed.