• This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations (Genzel et al.2015) between galaxy integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses and star formation rates, in the framework of the star formation main-sequence (MS), with the main goal to test for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ~1mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M*/M_solar)=9.0-11.8, and star formation rates relative to that on the MS, delta_MS=SFR/SFR(MS), from 10^{-1.3} to 10^{2.2}. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t_depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to star formation rate, scales as (1+z)^{-0.6}x(delta_MS)^{-0.44}, and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular-to-stellar mass mu_gas depends on (1+z)^{2.5}x (delta_MS)^{0.52}x(M*)^{-0.36}, which tracks the evolution of the specific star formation rate. The redshift dependence of mu_gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass-dependences of t_depl and mu_gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t_depl and mu_gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high-z.
  • The sensitivity of ALMA makes it possible to detect thermal mm/submm emission from small/distant Solar System bodies at the sub-mJy level. Measured fluxes are primarily sensitive to the objects' diameters, but deriving precise sizes is somewhat hampered by the uncertain effective emissivity at these wavelengths. Following Brown and Butler (2017) who presented ALMA data for four binary TNOs, we report ALMA 1.29 mm measurements of four Centaurs (2002 GZ$_{32}$, Bienor, Chiron, Chariklo) and two TNOs (Huya and Makemake), sampling a range of size, albedo and composition. These thermal fluxes are combined with mid/far-infrared fluxes to derive the relative emissivity at radio (mm/submm) wavelengths, using NEATM and thermophysical models. We reassess earlier thermal measurements of these and other objects -- including Pluto/Charon and Varuna -- exploring effects due to non-spherical shape and varying apparent pole orientation, and show that those can be key for reconciling previous diameter determinations and correctly estimating the spectral emissivities. We also evaluate the possible contribution to thermal fluxes of established (Chariklo) or claimed (Chiron) ring systems. As a general conclusion, all the objects, except Makemake, have radio emissivities significantly lower than unity. Although the emissivity values show diversity, we do not find any significant trend with physical parameters such as diameter, composition, beaming factor, albedo, or color, but we suggest that the emissivity could be correlated with grain size. The mean relative radio emissivity is found to be 0.70$\pm$0.13, a value that we recommend for the analysis of further mm/submm data.
  • Observations of the sungrazing comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) were carried out using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at a heliocentric distance of 0.58-0.54 AU (pre-perihelion) on 2013 November 16-17. Temporally resolved measurements of the coma distributions of HNC, CH$_3$OH, H$_2$CO and dust were obtained over the course of about an hour on each day. During the period UT 10:10-11:00 on Nov. 16, the comet displayed a remarkable drop in activity, manifested as a $>42$% decline in the molecular line and continuum fluxes. The H$_2$CO observations are consistent with an abrupt, $\approx50$% reduction in the cometary gas production rate soon after the start of our observations. On Nov. 17, the total observed fluxes remained relatively constant during a similar period, but strong variations in the morphology of the HNC distribution were detected as a function of time, indicative of a clumpy, intermittent outflow for this species. Our observations suggest that at least part of the detected HNC originated from degradation of nitrogen-rich organic refractory material, released intermittently from confined regions of the nucleus. By contrast, the distributions of CH$_3$OH and H$_2$CO during the Nov. 17 observations were relatively uniform, consistent with isotropic outflow and stable activity levels for these species. These results highlight a large degree of variability in the production of gas and dust from comet ISON during its pre-perihelion outburst, consistent with repeated disruption of the nucleus interspersed with periods of relative quiescence.
  • We present spatially and spectrally-resolved observations of CH$_3$OH emission from comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) using The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) on 2014 June 28-29. Two-dimensional maps of the line-of-sight average rotational temperature ($T_{rot}$) were derived, covering spatial scales $0.3''-1.8''$ (corresponding to sky-projected distances $\rho\sim500$-2500 km). The CH$_3$OH column density distributions are consistent with isotropic, uniform outflow from the nucleus, with no evidence for extended sources of CH$_3$OH in the coma. The $T_{rot}(\rho)$ radial profiles show a significant drop within a few thousand kilometers of the nucleus, falling from about 60 K to 20 K between $\rho=0$ and 2500 km on June 28, whereas on June 29, $T_{rot}$ fell from about 120 K to 40 K between $\rho=$ 0 km and 1000 km. The observed $T_{rot}$ behavior is interpreted primarily as a result of variations in the coma kinetic temperature due to adiabatic cooling of the outflowing gas, as well as radiative cooling of the CH$_3$OH rotational levels. Our excitation model shows that radiative cooling is more important for the $J=7-6$ transitions (at 338 GHz) than for the $K=3-2$ transitions (at 252 GHz), resulting in a strongly sub-thermal distribution of levels in the $J=7-6$ band at $\rho\gtrsim1000$ km. For both bands, the observed temperature drop with distance is less steep than predicted by standard coma theoretical models, which suggests the presence of a significant source of heating in addition to the photolytic heat sources usually considered.
  • Observations of the Pluto-Charon system, acquired with the ALMA interferometer on June 12-13, 2015, have yielded a detection of the CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) rotational transitions from Pluto, providing a strong confirmation of the presence of CO, and the first observation of HCN, in Pluto's atmosphere. The CO and HCN lines probe Pluto's atmosphere up to ~450 km and ~900 km altitude, respectively. The CO detection yields (i) a much improved determination of the CO mole fraction, as 515+/-40 ppm for a 12 ubar surface pressure (ii) clear evidence for a well-marked temperature decrease (i.e., mesosphere) above the 30-50 km stratopause and a best-determined temperature of 70+/-2 K at 300 km, in agreement with recent inferences from New Horizons / Alice solar occultation data. The HCN line shape implies a high abundance of this species in the upper atmosphere, with a mole fraction >1.5x10-5 above 450 km and a value of 4x10-5 near 800 km. The large HCN abundance and the cold upper atmosphere imply supersaturation of HCN to a degree (7-8 orders of magnitude) hitherto unseen in planetary atmospheres, probably due to the slow kinetics of condensation at the low pressure and temperature conditions of Pluto's upper atmosphere. HCN is also present in the bottom ~100 km of the atmosphere, with a 10-8 - 10-7 mole fraction; this implies either HCN saturation or undersaturation there, depending on the precise stratopause temperature. The HCN column is (1.6+/-0.4)x10^14 cm-2, suggesting a surface-referred net production rate of ~2x10^7 cm-2s-1. Although HCN rotational line cooling affects Pluto's atmosphere heat budget, the amounts determined in this study are insufficient to explain the well-marked mesosphere and upper atmosphere's ~70 K temperature. We finally report an upper limit on the HC3N column density (< 2x10^13 cm-2) and on the HC15N / HC14N ratio (< 1/125).
  • The apparition of bright comets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) in March-April 2013 and January 2015, combined with the improved observational capabilities of submillimeter facilities, offered an opportunity to carry out sensitive compositional and isotopic studies of the volatiles in their coma. We observed comet Lovejoy with the IRAM 30m telescope between 13 and 26 January 2015, and with the Odin submillimeter space observatory on 29 January - 3 February 2015. We detected 22 molecules and several isotopologues. The H$_2^{16}$O and H$_2^{18}$O production rates measured with Odin follow a periodic pattern with a period of 0.94 days and an amplitude of ~25%. The inferred isotope ratios in comet Lovejoy are $^{16}$O/$^{18}$O = 499 $\pm$ 24 and D/H = 1.4 $\pm$ 0.4 $\times 10^{-4}$ in water, $^{32}$S/$^{34}$S = 24.7 $\pm$ 3.5 in CS, all compatible with terrestrial values. The ratio $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C = 109 $\pm$ 14 in HCN is marginally higher than terrestrial and $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N = 145 $\pm$ 12 in HCN is half the Earth ratio. Several upper limits for D/H or 12C/13C in other molecules are reported. From our observation of HDO in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), we report the first D/H ratio in an Oort Cloud comet that is not larger than the terrestrial value. On the other hand, the observation of the same HDO line in the other Oort-cloud comet, C/2012 F6 (Lemmon), suggests a D/H value four times higher. Given the previous measurements of D/H in cometary water, this illustrates that a diversity in the D/H ratio and in the chemical composition, is present even within the same dynamical group of comets, suggesting that current dynamical groups contain comets formed at very different places or times in the early solar system.
  • The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) was used to obtain measurements of spatially and spectrally resolved CH$_3$OH emission from comet C/2012 K1 (PanSTARRS) on 28-29 June 2014. Detection of 12-14 emission lines of CH$_3$OH on each day permitted the derivation of spatially-resolved rotational temperature profiles (averaged along the line of sight), for the innermost 5000 km of the coma. On each day, the CH$_3$OH distribution was centrally peaked and approximately consistent with spherically symmetric, uniform outflow. The azimuthally-averaged CH$_3$OH rotational temperature ($T_{rot}$) as a function of sky-projected nucleocentric distance ($\rho$), fell by about 40 K between $\rho=0$ and 2500 km on 28 June, whereas on 29 June, $T_{rot}$ fell by about 50 K between $\rho=$0 km and 1500 km. A remarkable ($\sim50$ K) rise in $T_{rot}$ at $\rho=$1500-2500 km on 29 June was not present on 28 June. The observed variations in CH$_3$OH rotational temperature are interpreted primarily as a result of variations in the coma kinetic temperature due to adiabatic cooling, and heating through Solar irradiation, but collisional and radiative non-LTE excitation processes also play a role.
  • We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2 and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion time scale (tdepl) and gas to stellar mass ratio (Mmolgas/M*) of SFGs near the star formation main-sequence with redshift, specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass (M*). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO-H2 mass conversion factor varies little within 0.6dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms,z,M*)), and less than 0.3dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that tdepl scales as (1+z)^-0.3 *(sSFR/sSFR(ms,z,M*))^-0.5, with little dependence on M*. The resulting steep redshift dependence of Mmolgas/M* ~(1+z)^3 mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M* are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M* relation. Throughout the redshift range probed a larger sSFR at constant M* is due to a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion time scale. As a result galaxy integrated samples of the Mmolgas-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine Mmolgas with an accuracy of 0.1dex in relative terms, and 0.2dex including systematic uncertainties.
  • Results are presented from the first cometary observations using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), including measurements of the spatially-resolved distributions of HCN, HNC, H$_2$CO and dust within the comae of two comets: C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2012 S1 (ISON), observed at heliocentric distances of 1.5 AU and 0.54 AU, respectively. These observations (with angular resolution $\approx0.5''$), reveal an unprecedented level of detail in the distributions of these fundamental cometary molecules, and demonstrate the power of ALMA for quantitative measurements of the distributions of molecules and dust in the inner comae of typical bright comets. In both comets, HCN is found to originate from (or within a few hundred km of) the nucleus, with a spatial distribution largely consistent with spherically-symmetric, uniform outflow. By contrast, the HNC distributions are clumpy and asymmetrical, with peaks at cometocentric radii $\sim$500-1000~km, consistent with release of HNC in collimated outflow(s). Compared to HCN, the H$_2$CO distribution in comet Lemmon is very extended. The interferometric visibility amplitudes are consistent with coma production of H$_2$CO and HNC from unidentified precursor material(s) in both comets. Adopting a Haser model, the H$_2$CO parent scale-length is found to be a few thousand km in Lemmon and only a few hundred km in ISON, consistent with destruction of the precursor by photolysis or thermal degradation at a rate which scales in proportion to the Solar radiation flux.
  • A spectral survey in the 1 mm wavelength range was undertaken in the long-period comets C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using the 30 m telescope of the Institut de radioastronomie millim\'etrique (IRAM) in April and November-December 2013. We report the detection of ethylene glycol (CH$_2$OH)$_2$ (aGg' conformer) and formamide (NH$_2$CHO) in the two comets. The abundances relative to water of ethylene glycol and formamide are 0.2-0.3% and 0.02% in the two comets, similar to the values measured in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp). We also report the detection of HCOOH and CH$_3$CHO in comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), and a search for other complex species (methyl formate, glycolaldehyde).
  • HCl and HF are expected to be the main reservoirs of fluorine and chlorine wherever hydrogen is predominantly molecular. They are found to be strongly depleted in dense molecular clouds, suggesting freeze-out onto grains in such cold environments. We can then expect that HCl and HF were also the major carriers of Cl and F in the gas and icy phases of the outer solar nebula, and were incorporated into comets. We aimed to measure the HCl and HF abundances in cometary ices as they can provide insights on the halogen chemistry in the early solar nebula. We searched for the J(1-0) lines of HCl and HF at 626 and 1232 GHz, respectively, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. HCl was searched for in comets 103P/Hartley 2 and C/2009 P1 (Garradd), whereas observations of HF were conducted in comet C/2009 P1. In addition, observations of H$_2$O and H$_2^{18}$O lines were performed in C/2009 P1 to measure the H$_2$O production rate. Three lines of CH$_3$OH were serendipitously observed in the HCl receiver setting. HCl is not detected, whereas a marginal (3.6-$\sigma$) detection of HF is obtained. The upper limits for the HCl abundance relative to water are 0.011% and 0.022%, for 103P and C/2009 P1, respectively, showing that HCl is depleted with respect to the solar Cl/O abundance by a factor more than 6$^{+6}_{-3}$ in 103P, where the error is related to the uncertainty in the chlorine solar abundance. The marginal HF detection obtained in C/2009 P1 corresponds to an HF abundance relative to water of (1.8$\pm$0.5) $\times$ 10$^{-4}$, which is approximately consistent with a solar photospheric F/O abundance. The observed depletion of HCl suggests that HCl was not the main reservoir of chlorine in the regions of the solar nebula where these comets formed. HF was possibly the main fluorine compound in the gas phase of the outer solar nebula.
  • Comet 103P/Hartley 2 made a close approach to the Earth in October 2010. It was the target of an extensive observing campaign and was visited by the Deep Impact spacecraft (mission EPOXI). We present observations of HCN and CH3OH emission lines conducted with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer on 22-23, 28 October and 4, 5 November 2010 at 1.1, 1.9 and 3.4 mm wavelengths. The thermal emission from the dust coma and nucleus is detected simultaneously. Interferometric images with unprecedented spatial resolution are obtained. A sine-wave variation of the thermal continuum is observed in the 23 October data, that we associate with the nucleus thermal light curve. The nucleus contributes up to 30-55 % of the observed continuum. The large dust-to-gas ratio (in the range 2-6) can be explained by the unusual activity of the comet for its size, which allows decimeter size particles and large boulders to be entrained by the gas. The rotational temperature of CH3OH is measured. We attribute the increase from 35 to 46 K with increasing beam size (from 150 to 1500 km) to radiative processes. The HCN production rate displays strong rotation-induced variations. The HCN production curve, as well as those of CO2 and H2O measured by EPOXI, are interpreted with a geometric model which takes into account the rotation and the shape of the comet. The HCN and H2O production curves are in phase, showing common sources. The 1.7h delay, in average, of HCN and H2O with respect to the CO2 production curve suggests that HCN and H2O are mainly produced by subliming icy grains. The scale length of production of HCN is determined to be on the order of 500-1000 km, implying a mean velocity of 100-200 m/s for the icy grains producing HCN. The modulation of the CO2 prouction and of the velocity offset of the HCN lines are interpreted in terms of localized sources of gas on the nucleus surface.
  • Little is known about the physical properties of the nuclei of Oort cloud comets. Measuring the thermal emission of a nucleus is one of the few means for deriving its size and constraining some of its thermal properties. We attempted to measure the nucleus size of the Oort cloud comet C/2009 P1 (Garradd). We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to measure the millimetric thermal emission of this comet at 157 GHz (1.9 mm) and 266 GHz (1.1 mm). Whereas the observations at 266 GHz were not usable due to bad atmospheric conditions, we derived a 3-sigma upper limit on the comet continuum emission of 0.41 mJy at 157 GHz. Using a thermal model for a spherical nucleus with standard thermal parameters, we found an upper limit of 5.6 km for the radius. The dust contribution to our signal is estimated to be negligible. Given the water production rates measured for this comet and our upper limit, we estimated that Garradd was very active, with an active fraction of its nucleus larger than 50%.
  • Comet 17P/Holmes underwent a dramatic outburst in October 2007, caused by the sudden fragmentation of its nucleus and the production of a large quantity of grains scattering sunlight. We report on 90 GHz continuum observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer on 27.1 and 28.2 October 2007 UT, i.e., 4-5 days after the outburst. These observations probed the thermal radiation of large dust particles, and therefore provide the best constraints on the mass in the ejecta debris. The thermal emission of the debris was modelled and coupled to a time-dependent description of their expansion after the outburst. The analysis was performed in the Fourier plane. Visibilities were computed for the two observing dates and compared to the data to measure their velocity and mass. Optical data and 250-GHz continuum measurements published in the literature were used to further constrain the dust kinematics and size distribution. Two distinct dust components in terms of kinematic properties are identified in the data. The large-velocity component, with typical velocities V0 of 50-100 m/s for 1 mm particles, displays a steep size distribution with a size index estimated to q = -3.7 (\pm0.1), assuming a minimum grain size of 0.1 \mum. It corresponds to the fast expanding shell observed in optical images. The slowly-moving "core" component (V0 = 7-9 m/s) detected near the nucleus has a size index |q| < 3.4 and contains a higher proportion of large particles than the shell. The dust mass in the core is in the range 0.1-1 that of the shell. Using optical constants pertaining to porous grains (50% porosity) made of astronomical silicates mixed with water ice (48% in mass), the total dust mass Mdust injected by the outburst is estimated to 4-14 x 10**11 kg, corresponding to 3-9% the nucleus mass.
  • The Jupiter-family comet 10P/Tempel 2 was observed during its 2010 return with the Herschel Space Observatory. We present here the observation of the (J, K) = (1, 0)-(0, 0) transition of ammonia at 572 GHz in this comet with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) of Herschel. We also report on radio observations of other molecules (HCN, CH3OH, H2S and CS) obtained during the 1999 return of the comet with the CSO telescope and the JCMT, and during its 2010 return with the IRAM 30-m telescope. Molecular abundances relative to water are 0.09%, 1.8%, 0.4%, and 0.08% for HCN, CH3OH, H2S, and CS, respectively. An abundance of 0.5% for NH3 is obtained, which is similar to the values measured in other comets. The hyperfine structure of the ammonia line is resolved for the first time in an astronomical source. Strong anisotropy in the outgassing is present in all observations from 1999 to 2010 and is modelled to derive the production rates.
  • Little is known about the physical properties of cometary nuclei. Apart from space mission targets, measuring the thermal emission of a nucleus is one of the few means to derive its size, independently of its albedo, and to constrain some of its thermal properties. This emission is difficult to detect from Earth but space telescopes (Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, Herschel Space Observatory) allow reliable measurements in the infrared and the sub-millimetre domains. We aim at better characterizing the thermal properties of the nucleus of comet 8P/Tuttle using multi-wavelentgh space- and ground-based observations, in the visible, infrared, and millimetre range. We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to measure the millimetre thermal emission of comet 8P/Tuttle at 240 GHz (1.25 mm) and analysed the observations with the shape model derived from Hubble Space Telescope observations and the nucleus size derived from Spitzer Space Telescope observations. We report on the first detection of the millimetre thermal emission of a cometary nucleus since comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp in 1997. Using the two contact spheres shape model derived from Hubble Space Telescope observations, we constrained the thermal properties of the nucleus. Our millimetre observations are best match with: i) a thermal inertia lower than ~10 J K-1 m-2 s-1/2, ii) an emissivity lower than 0.8, indicating a non-negligible contribution of the colder sub-surface layers to the outcoming millimetre flux.
  • Based on long-slit infrared spectroscopic observations, it has been suggested that half of the carbon monoxide present in the atmosphere of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) close to perihelion was released by a distributed source in the coma, whose nature (dust or gas) remains unidentified. We re-assess the origin of CO in Hale-Bopp's coma from millimeter interferometric data and a re-analysis of the IR lines. Simultaneous observations of the CO J(1-0) (115 GHz) and J(2-1) (230 GHz) lines were undertaken with the IRAM interferometer in single-dish and interferometric modes. The diversity of angular resolutions (from 1700 to 42000 km diameter at the comet) is suitable to study the radial distribution of CO and detect the extended source observed in the infrared. We used excitation and radiative transfer models to simulate the observations. Various CO density distributions were considered, including 3D time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations which reproduce a CO rotating jet. The CO J(1-0) and J(2-1) observations can be consistently explained by a nuclear production of CO. Composite 50:50 nuclear/extended productions with characteristic scale lengths of CO parent L_p > 1500 km are rejected. Based on similar radiation transfer calculations, we show that the CO v = 1-0 ro-vibrational lines observed in comet Hale-Bopp at heliocentric distances less than 1.5 AU are severely optically thick. The broad extent of the CO brightness distribution in the infrared is mainly due to optical depth effects. Additional factors can be found in the complex structure of the CO coma, and non-ideal slit positioning caused by the anisotropy of dust IR emission. We conclude that both CO millimeter and infrared lines do not provide compelling evidence for a distributed source of CO in Hale-Bopp's atmosphere.
  • Observations of the CO J(1-0) 115 GHz and J(2-1) 230 GHz lines in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) were performed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer on 11 March, 1997. The observations were conducted in both single-dish (ON-OFF) and interferometric modes with 0.13 km s-1 spectral resolution. Images of CO emission with 1.7 to 3" angular resolution were obtained. The ON-OFF and interferometric spectra show a velocity shift with sinusoidal time variations related to the Hale-Bopp nucleus rotation of 11.35 h. The peak position of the CO images moves perpendicularly to the spin axis direction in the plane of the sky. This suggests the presence of a CO jet, which is active night and day at about the same extent, and is spiralling with nucleus rotation. The high quality of the data allows us to constrain the characteristics of this CO jet. We have developed a 3-D model to interpret the temporal evolution of CO spectra and maps. The CO coma is represented as the combination of an isotropic distribution and a spiralling gas jet, both of nucleus origin. Spectra and visibilities (the direct output of interferometric data) analysis shows that the CO jet comprises ~40% the total CO production and is located at a latitude ~20 degrees North on the nucleus surface. Our inability to reproduce all observational characteristics shows that the real structure of the CO coma is more complex than assumed, especially in the first thousand kilometres from the nucleus. The presence of another moving CO structure, faint but compact and possibly created by an outburst, is identified.
  • A fundamental question in cometary science is whether the different dynamical classes of comets have different chemical compositions, which would reflect different initial conditions. From the ground or Earth orbit, radio and infrared spectroscopic observations of a now significant sample of comets indeed reveal deep differences in the relative abundances of cometary ices. However, no obvious correlation with dynamical classes is found. Further results come, or are expected, from space exploration. Such investigations, by nature limited to a small number of objects, are unfortunately focussed on short-period comets (mainly Jupiter-family). But these in situ studies provide "ground truth" for remote sensing. We discuss the chemical differences in comets from our database of spectroscopic radio observations, which has been recently enriched by several Jupiter-family and Halley-type comets.
  • From millimeter and optical observations of the Jupiter-family comet 17P/Holmes performed soon after its huge outburst of October 24, 2007, we derive 14 N/15N = 139 +/- 26 in HCN, and 14N/15N = 165 +/- 40 in CN, establishing that HCN has the same non-terrestrial isotopic composition as CN. The same conclusion is obtained for the long-period comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) after a reanalysis of previously published measurements. These results are compatible with HCN being the prime parent of CN in cometary atmospheres. The 15N excess relative to the Earth atmospheric value indicates that N-bearing volatiles in the solar nebula underwent important N isotopic fractionation at some stage of Solar System formation. HCN molecules never isotopically equilibrated with the main nitrogen reservoir in the solar nebula before being incorporated in Oort-cloud and Kuiper-belt comets. The 12C/13C ratios in HCN and CN are measured to be consistent with the terrestrial value.
  • We present a sensitive 3-sigma upper limit of 1.1% for the HNC/HCN abundance ratio in comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann (Fragment B), obtained on May 10-11, 2006 using Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). This limit is a factor of ~7 lower than the values measured previously in moderately active comets at 1 AU from the Sun. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann was depleted in most volatile species, except of HCN. The low HNC/HCN ratio thus argues against HNC production from polymers produced from HCN. However, thermal degradation of macromolecules, or polymers, produced from ammonia and carbon compounds, such as acetylene, methane, or ethane appears a plausible explanation for the observed variations of the HNC/HCN ratio in moderately active comets, including the very low ratio in comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann reported here. Similar polymers have been invoked previously to explain anomalous 14N/15N ratios measured in cometary CN.
  • We present observations of rotational lines of H2S, SO and CS performed in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in March 1997 with the Plateau de Bure interferometer (IRAM). The observations provide informations on the spatial and velocity distributions of these molecules. They can be used to constrain their photodissociation rate and their origin. We use a radiative transfer code which allows us to compute synthetic line profiles and interferometric maps, to be compared to the observations. Both single-dish spectra and interferometric spectral maps show a day/night asymmetry in the outgassing. From the analysis of the spectral maps, including the astrometry, we show that SO and CS present in addition a jet-like structure that may be the gaseous counterpart of the dust high-latitude jet observed in optical images. A CS rotating jet is also observed. Using the astrometry provided by continuum radio maps obtained in parallel, we conclude that there is no need to invoke of nongravitational forces acting on this comet, and provide an updated orbit. The radial extension of H2S is found to be consistent with direct release from the nucleus. SO displays an extended radial distribution. Assuming that SO2 is the parent of SO, the photodissociation rate of SO is measured to be 1.5 E-4 s-1 at 1 AU from the Sun. This is lower than most laboratory-based estimates and may suggest that SO is not solely produced by SO2 photolysis. From the observations of J(2-1) and J(5-4) CS lines, we deduce a CS photodissociation rate of 1 to 5 E-5 s-1. The photodissociation rate of CS2, the likely parent of CS, cannot be constrained due to insufficient resolution, but our data are consistent with published values. These observations illustrate the cometary science that will be performed with the future ALMA interferometer.
  • Comet 9P/Tempel 1 was the target of a multi-wavelength worldwide investigation in 2005. The NASA Deep Impact mission reached the comet on 4.24 July 2005, delivering a 370 kg impactor which hit the comet at 10.3 km/s. Following this impact, a cloud of gas and dust was excavated from the comet nucleus. The comet was observed in 2005 prior to and after the impact, at 18-cm wavelength with the Nan\c{c}ay radio telescope, in the millimetre range with the IRAM and CSO radio telescopes, and at 557 GHz with the Odin satellite. Post-impact observations at IRAM and CSO did not reveal a significant change of the outgassing rates and relative abundances, with the exception of CH_3OH which may have been more abundant by up to one order of magnitude in the ejecta. Most other variations are linked to the intrinsic variability of the comet. The Odin satellite monitored nearly continuously the H_2O line at 557 GHz during the 38 hours following the impact on the 4th of July, in addition to weekly monitoring. Once the periodic variations related to the nucleus rotation are removed, a small increase of outgassing related to the impact is present, which corresponds to the release of \approx 5000+/-2000 tons of water. Two other bursts of activity, also observed at other wavelengths, were seen on 23 June and 7 July; they correspond to even larger releases of gas.