• The loss of single-particle coherence going from the superconducting state to the normal state in underdoped cuprates is a dramatic effect that has yet to be understood. Here, we address this issue by performing angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) measurements in the presence of a transport current. We find that the loss of coherence is associated with the development of an onset in the resistance, in that well before the midpoint of the transition is reached, the sharp peaks in the ARPES spectra are completely suppressed. Since the resistance onset is a signature of phase fluctuations, this implies that the loss of single-particle coherence is connected with the loss of long-range phase coherence.
  • A charge-density wave (CDW) state has a broken symmetry described by a complex order parameter with an amplitude and a phase. The conventional view, based on clean, weak-coupling systems, is that a finite amplitude and long-range phase coherence set in simultaneously at the CDW transition temperature T$_{cdw}$. Here we investigate, using photoemission, X-ray scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy, the canonical CDW compound 2H-NbSe$_2$ intercalated with Mn and Co, and show that the conventional view is untenable. We find that, either at high temperature or at large intercalation, CDW order becomes short-ranged with a well-defined amplitude that impacts the electronic dispersion, giving rise to an energy gap. The phase transition at T$_{cdw}$ marks the onset of long-range order with global phase coherence, leading to sharp electronic excitations. Our observations emphasize the importance of phase fluctuations in strongly coupled CDW systems and provide insights into the significance of phase incoherence in `pseudogap' states.
  • One of the most intriguing aspects of cuprates is a large pseudogap coexisting with a high superconducting transition temperature. Here, we study pairing in the cuprates from electron-electron interactions by constructing the pair vertex using spectral functions derived from angle resolved photoemission data for a near optimal doped Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ sample that has a pronounced pseudogap. Assuming that that the pseudogap is {\it not} due to pairing, we find that the superconducting instability is strongly suppressed, in stark contrast to what is actually observed. Using an analytic approximation for the spectral functions, we can trace this suppression to the destruction of the BCS logarithmic singularity from a combination of the pseudogap and lifetime broadening. Our findings strongly support those theories of the cuprates where the pseudogap is instead due to pairing.
  • In order to understand the origin of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides, we must understand the normal state from which it emerges. Here, we examine the evolution of the normal state electronic excitations with temperature and carrier concentration in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 using angle-resolved photoemission. In contrast to conventional superconductors, where there is a single temperature scale Tc separating the normal from the superconducting state, the high- temperature superconductors exhibit two additional temperature scales. One is the pseudogap scale T*, below which electronic excitations exhibit an energy gap. The second is the coherence scale Tcoh, below which sharp spectral features appear due to increased lifetime of the excitations. We find that T* and Tcoh are strongly doping dependent and cross each other near optimal doping. Thus the highest superconducting Tc emerges from an unusual normal state that is characterized by coherent excitations with an energy gap.
  • We report temperature- and magnetic field-dependent bulk muon spin rotation measurements in a c-axis oriented superconductor CaC6 in the mixed state. Using both a simple second moment analysis and the more precise analytical Ginzburg-Landau model, we obtained a field independent in-plane magnetic penetration depth {\lambda}ab (0) = 72(3) nm. The temperature dependencies of the normalized muon spin relaxation rate and of the normalized superfluid density result to be identical, and both are well represented by the clean limit BCS model with 2\Delta/kB Tc = 3.6(1), suggesting that CaC6 is a fully gapped BCS superconductor in the clean limit regime.
  • Comment on "Circular Dichroism in the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectrum of the High-Temperature Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 Superconductor: Can These Measurements Be Interpreted as Evidence for Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking?"
  • We use angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy to probe the electronic excitations of the non-superconducting state that exists between the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator at zero doping and the superconducting state at larger dopings in Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_{8+\delta}. We find that this state is a nodal liquid whose excitation gap becomes zero only at points in momentum space. Despite exhibiting a resistivity characteristic of an insulator and the absence of coherent quasiparticle peaks, this material has the same gap structure as the d-wave superconductor. We observe a smooth evolution of the spectrum across the insulator-to-superconductor transition, which suggests that high temperature superconductivity emerges when quantum phase coherence is established in a non-superconducting nodal liquid.
  • Angle-resolved photoemission on underdoped La$_{1.895}$Sr$_{0.105}$CuO$_4$ reveals that in the pseudogap phase, the dispersion has two branches located above and below the Fermi level with a minimum at the Fermi momentum. This is characteristic of the Bogoliubov dispersion in the superconducting state. We also observe that the superconducting and pseudogaps have the same d-wave form with the same amplitude. Our observations provide direct evidence for preformed Cooper pairs, implying that the pseudogap phase is a precursor to superconductivity.
  • We present angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data on moderately underdoped La$_{1.855}$Sr$_{0.145}$CuO$_4$ at temperatures below and above the superconducting transition temperature. Unlike previous studies of this material, we observe sharp spectral peaks along the entire underlying Fermi surface in the superconducting state. These peaks trace out an energy gap that follows a simple {\it d}-wave form, with a maximum superconducting gap of 14 meV. Our results are consistent with a single gap picture for the cuprates. Furthermore our data on the even more underdoped sample La$_{1.895}$Sr$_{0.105}$CuO$_4$ also show sharp spectral peaks, even at the antinode, with a maximum superconducting gap of 26 meV.
  • In the underdoped high temperature superconductors, instead of a complete Fermi surface above Tc, only disconnected Fermi arcs appear, separated by regions that still exhibit an energy gap. We show that in this pseudogap phase, the energy-momentum relation of electronic excitations near E_F behaves like the dispersion of a normal metal on the Fermi arcs, but like that of a superconductor in the gapped regions. We argue that this dichotomy in the dispersion is hard to reconcile with a competing order parameter, but is consistent with pairing without condensation.
  • Angle resolved photoemission on underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 reveals that the magnitude and d-wave anisotropy of the superconducting state energy gap are independent of temperature all the way up to Tc. This lack of T variation of the entire k-dependent gap is in marked contrast to mean field theory. At Tc the point nodes of the d-wave gap abruptly expand into finite length ``Fermi arcs''. This change occurs within the width of the resistive transition, and thus the Fermi arcs are not simply thermally broadened nodes but rather a unique signature of the pseudogap phase.
  • Angle resolved photoemission data in the pseudogap phase of underdoped cuprates have revealed the presence of a truncated Fermi surface consisting of Fermi arcs. We compare a number of proposed models for the arcs, and find that the one that best models the data is a d-wave energy gap with a lifetime broadening whose temperature dependence is suggestive of fluctuating pairs.
  • We find that peaks in the autocorrelation of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy data of Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$ in the superconducting state show dispersive behavior for binding energies smaller than the maximum superconducting energy gap. For higher energies, though, a striking anomalous dispersion is observed that is a consequence of the interaction of the electrons with collective excitations. In contrast, in the pseudogap phase, we only observe dispersionless behavior for the autocorrelation peaks. The implications of our findings in regards to Fourier transformed scanning tunneling spectroscopy data are discussed.
  • We introduce a formalism for calculating dynamic response functions using experimental single particle Green's functions derived from angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). As an illustration of this procedure we estimate the dynamic spin response of the cuprate superconductor Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8+\delta}$. We find good agreement with superconducting state neutron data, in particular the $(\pi,\pi)$ resonance with its unusual `reversed magnon' dispersion. We anticipate our formalism will also be of useful in interpreting results from other spectroscopies, such as optical and Raman responses.
  • We have performed systematic angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) on single-layered cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CuO6 to elucidate the origin of shadow band. We found that the shadow band is exactly the c(2x2) replica of the main band irrespective of the carrier concentration and its intensity is invariable with respect to temperature, doping, and substitution constituents of block layers. This result rules out the possibility of antiferromagnetic correlation and supports the structural origin of shadow band. ARPES experiments on optimally doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 also clarified the existence of the c(2x2) shadow band, demonstrating that the shadow band is not a unique feature of Bi-based cuprates. We conclude that the shadow band is related to the orthorhombic distortion at the crystal surface.
  • The pseudogap phase in the cuprates is a most unusual state of matter: it is a metal, but its Fermi surface is broken up into disconnected segments known as Fermi arcs. Using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we show that the anisotropy of the pseudogap in momentum space and the resulting arcs depend only on the ratio T/T*(x), where T*(x) is the temperature below which the pseudogap first develops at a given hole doping x. In particular, the arcs collapse linearly with T/T* and extrapolate to zero extent as T goes to 0. This suggests that the T = 0 pseudogap state is a nodal liquid, a strange metallic state whose gapless excitations are located only at points in momentum space, just as in a d-wave superconductor.
  • We report the observation of a change in Fermi surface topology of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 with doping. By collecting high statistics ARPES data from moderately and highly overdoped samples and dividing the data by the Fermi function, we answer a long standing question about the Fermi surface shape of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 close to the (pi,0) point. For moderately overdoped samples (Tc=80K) we find that both the bonding and antibonding sheets of the Fermi surface are hole-like. However for a doping level corresponding to Tc=55K we find that the antibonding sheet becomes electron-like. This change does not directly affect the critical temperature and therefore the superconductivity. However, since similar observations of the change of the topology of the Fermi surface were observed in LSCO and Bi2Sr2Cu2O6, it appears to be a generic feature of hole-doped superconductors. Because of bilayer splitting, though, this doping value is considerably lower than that for the single layer materials, which again argues that it is unrelated to Tc.
  • The autocorrelation of angle resolved photoemission data from the high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d shows distinct peaks in momentum space which disperse with binding energy in the superconducting state, but not in the pseudogap phase. Although it is tempting to attribute a non-dispersive behavior in momentum space to some ordering phenomenon, a de-construction of the autocorrelation reveals that the non-dispersive peaks arise not from ordering, but rather from the tips of the Fermi arcs, which themselves do not change with binding energy.
  • We examine the momentum and energy dependence of the scattering rate of the high temperature cuprate superconductors using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The scattering rate is of the form a + bw around the Fermi surface for under and optimal doping. The inelastic coefficient "b" is found to be isotropic. The elastic term, "a", however, is found to be highly anisotropic for under and optimally doped samples, with an anisotropy which correlates with that of the pseudogap. This is contrasted with heavily overdoped samples, which show an isotropic scattering rate and an absence of the pseudogap above T_c. We find this to be a generic property for both single and double layer compounds.
  • We examine the momentum and energy dependence of the scattering rate of the high temperature cuprate superconductors using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The scattering rate is of the form a + b*w. The inelastic coefficient b is found to be isotropic. The elastic term, a, however, is found to be highly anisotropic in the pseudogap phase of optimal doped samples, with an anisotropy which correlates with that of the pseudogap. This can be contrasted with heavily overdoped samples, which show an isotropic scattering rate in the normal state.
  • One of the interesting features of the photoemission spectra of the high temperature cuprate superconductors is the presence of a large signal (referred to as the "background'') in the unoccupied region of the Brillouin zone. Here we present data indicating that the origin of this signal is extrinsic and is most likely due to strong scattering of the photoelectrons. We also present an analytical method that can be used to subtract the background signal.
  • The recent experiments reported by Borisenko et al. (cond-mat/0305179 v2), are examined in light of the conditions to be satisfied in the search for time-reversal violation by circularly polarized ARPES. Two principal problems are found: (1) A lack of any evidence for the magnitude of the pseudogap or the temperature of its onset in the samples studied. (2) A difference in the dichroic signal at low and high temperatures. The difference is greater than the stated error bars and is contrary to the conclusions reached in the paper.
  • In a recent comment [1], Armitage and Hu have suggested that our experiment observing dichroism in angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) [2] could not be conclusively interpreted as arising from time reversal symmetry breaking, arguing that our observations are likely due to structural effects. The concerns expressed by Armitage and Hu that our results could be due to a change in the mirror plane are as important as they are obvious. In fact the first part of their comment merely restates the results of Simon and Varma [3] about the relationship and contrast of effects due to time reversal symmetry breaking and those caused by crystallographic changes. In any test of time reversal symmetry one must ensure that parity alone is not inducing the observed changes. We have indeed considered this issue very carefully in the course of our study [2] and it is precisely the lack of temperature dependent structural changes significant enough to explain the magnitude of the observed dichroism that forced us to conclude that time reversal symmetry breaking is the only plausible explanation. Furthermore, recent experiments by Borisenko, et al. [4] confirm that changes in the mirror plane are unmeasurably small.
  • Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and resistivity measurements are used to explore the overdoped region of the high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta. We find evidence for a new crossover line in the phase diagram between a coherent metal phase for lower temperatures and higher doping, and an incoherent metal phase for higher temperatures and lower doping. The former is characterized by two well-defined spectral peaks in ARPES due to coherent bilayer splitting and superlinear behavior in the resistivity, whereas the latter is characterized by a single broad spectral feature in ARPES and a linear temperature dependence of the resistivity.
  • We review angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results on the high Tc superconductors, focusing primarily on results obtained on the quasi-two dimensional cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 and its single layer counterpart Bi2Sr2CuO6. The topics treated include the basics of photoemission and methodologies for analyzing spectra, normal state electronic structure including the Fermi surface, the superconducting energy gap, the normal state pseudogap, and the electron self-energy as determined from photoemission lineshapes.