• If the scalar sector of the Standard Model is non-minimal, one might expect multiple generations of the hypercharge-1/2 scalar doublet analogous to the generational structure of the fermions. In this work, we examine the structure of a Higgs sector consisting of N Higgs doublets (where N \geq 2). It is particularly convenient to work in the so-called charged Higgs basis, in which the neutral Higgs vacuum expectation value resides entirely in the first Higgs doublet, and the charged components of remaining N-1 Higgs doublets are mass-eigenstate fields. We elucidate the interactions of the gauge bosons with the physical Higgs scalars and the Goldstone bosons and show that they are determined by an Nx2N matrix. This matrix depends on (N-1)(2N-1) real parameters that are associated with the mixing of the neutral Higgs fields in the charged Higgs basis. Among these parameters, N-1 are unphysical (and can be removed by rephasing the physical charged Higgs fields), and the remaining 2(N-1)^2 parameters are physical. We also demonstrate a particularly simple form for the cubic interaction and some of the quartic interactions of the Goldstone bosons with the physical Higgs scalars. These results are applied in the derivation of Higgs coupling sum rules and tree-level unitarity bounds that restrict the size of the quartic scalar couplings. In particular, new applications to three Higgs doublet models with an order-4 CP symmetry and with a Z_3 symmetry, respectively, are presented.
  • The latest LHC data confirmed the existence of a Higgs-like particle and made interesting measurements on its decays into $\gamma \gamma$, $Z Z^\ast$, $W W^\ast$, $\tau^+ \tau^-$, and $b \bar{b}$. It is expected that a decay into $Z \gamma$ might be measured at the next LHC round, for which there already exists an upper bound. The Higgs-like particle could be a mixture of scalar with a relatively large component of pseudoscalar. We compute the decay of such a mixed state into $Z \gamma$, and we study its properties in the context of the complex two Higgs doublet model, analysing the effect of the current measurements on the four versions of this model. We show that a measurement of the $h \rightarrow Z \gamma$ rate at a level consistent with the SM can be used to place interesting constraints on the pseudoscalar component. We also comment on the issue of a wrong sign Yukawa coupling for the bottom in Type II models.
  • We discuss several manifestations of charged lepton flavour violation at high energies. Focusing on a supersymmetric type I seesaw, considering constrained and semi-constrained supersymmetry breaking scenarios, we analyse different observables, both at the LHC and at a future Linear Collider. We further discuss how the synergy between low- and high-energy observables can shed some light on the underlying mechanism of lepton flavour violation.
  • We suggest a minimal extension of the simplest A4 flavour model that can induce a nonzero theta13 value, as required by recent neutrino oscillation data from reactors and accelerators. The predicted correlation between the atmospheric mixing angle theta23 and the magnitude of theta13 leads to an allowed region substantially smaller than indicated by neutrino oscillation global fits. Moreover, the scheme correlates CP violation in neutrino oscillations with the octant of the atmospheric mixing parameter theta23 in such a way that, for example, maximal mixing necessarily violates CP. We briefly comment on other phenomenological features of the model.
  • We study the potential of an e+- e- Linear Collider for charged lepton flavour violation studies in a supersymmetric framework where neutrino masses and mixings are explained by a type-I seesaw. Focusing on e-mu flavour transitions, we evaluate the background from standard model and supersymmetric charged currents to the e mu + missing E_T signal. We study the energy dependence of both signal and background, and the effect of beam polarisation in increasing the signal over background significance. Finally, we consider the mu- mu- + missing E_T final state in e- e- collisions that, despite being signal suppressed by requiring two e-mu flavour transitions, is found to be a clear signature of charged lepton flavour violation due to a very reduced standard model background.
  • We construct lists of supersymmetric models with extended gauge groups at intermediate steps, all of which are based on SO(10) unification. We consider three different kinds of setups: (i) The model has exactly one additional intermediate scale with a left-right (LR) symmetric group; (ii) SO(10) is broken to the LR group via an intermediate Pati-Salam (PS) scale; and (iii) the LR group is broken into $SU(3)_{c} \times SU(2)_{L} \times U(1)_{R} \times U(1)_{B-L}$, before breaking to the SM group. We use sets of conditions, which we call the "sliding mechanism", which yield unification with the extended gauge group(s) allowed at arbitrary intermediate energy scales. All models thus can have new gauge bosons within the reach of the LHC, in principle. We apply additional conditions, such as perturbative unification, renormalizability and anomaly cancellation and find that, despite these requirements, for the ansatz (i) with only one additional scale still around 50 different variants exist that can have an LR symmetry below 10 TeV. For the more complicated schemes (ii) and (iii) literally thousands of possible variants exist, and for scheme (ii) we have also found variants with very low PS scales. We also discuss possible experimental tests of the models from measurements of SUSY masses. Assuming mSugra boundary conditions we calculate certain combinations of soft terms, called "invariants", for the different classes of models. Values for all the invariants can be classified into a small number of sets, which contain information about the class of models and, in principle, the scale of beyond-MSSM physics, even in case the extended gauge group is broken at an energy beyond the reach of the LHC.
  • It has been pointed out that supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model can induce significant changes to the theoretical prediction of the ratio $\Gamma(K\rightarrow e\nu)/\Gamma (K\rightarrow\mu\nu)\equiv R_{K}$, through lepton flavour violating couplings. In this work we carry out a full computation of all one-loop corrections to the relevant $\nu\ell H^{+}$ vertex, and discuss the new contributions to $R_{K}$ arising in the context of different constrained (minimal supergravity inspired) models which succeed in accounting for neutrino data, further considering the possibility of accommodating a near future observation of a $\mu\to e\gamma$ transition. We also re-evaluate the prospects for $R_{K}$ in the framework of unconstrained supersymmetric models. In all cases, we address the question of whether it is possible to saturate the current experimental sensitivity on $R_{K}$ while in agreement with the recent limits on $B$-meson decay observables (in particular BR($B_{s}\to\mu^+\mu^-$) and R($B_{u}\to\tau\nu$)), as well as BR($\tau\to e \gamma$) and available collider constraints. Our findings reveal that in view of the recent bounds, and even when enhanced by effective sources of flavour violation in the right-handed $\tilde{e}-\tilde{\tau}$ sector, constrained supersymmetric (seesaw) models typically provide excessively small contributions to $R_{K}$. Larger contributions can be found in more general settings, where the charged Higgs mass can be effectively lowered, and even further enhanced in the unconstrained MSSM. However, our analysis clearly shows that even in this last case SUSY contributions to $R_{K}$ are still unable to saturate the current experimental bounds on this observable, especially due to a strong tension with the $B_{u}\to\tau\nu$ bound.
  • We revisit the potential of a Linear Collider concerning the study of lepton flavour violation, in view of new LHC bounds and of the (very) recent developments in lepton physics. Working in the framework of a type I supersymmetric seesaw, we evaluate the prospects of observing seesaw-induced lepton flavour violating final states of the type e \mu + missing energy, arising from e+ e- and e- e- collisions. In both cases we address the potential background from standard model and supersymmetric charged currents. We also explore the possibility of electron and positron beam polarisation. The statistical significance of the signal, even in the absence of kinematical and/or detector cuts, renders the observation of such flavour violating events feasible over large regions of the parameter space. We further consider the \mu-\mu- + E^T_miss final state in the e- e- beam option finding that, due to a very suppressed background, this process turns out to be a truly clear probe of a supersymmetric seesaw, assuming the latter to be the unique source of lepton flavour violation.
  • Left-right symmetric extensions of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model can explain neutrino data and have potentially interesting phenomenology beyond that found in minimal SUSY seesaw models. Here we study a SUSY model in which the left-right symmetry is broken by triplets at a high scale, but significantly below the GUT scale. Sparticle spectra in this model differ from the usual constrained MSSM expectations and these changes affect the relic abundance of the lightest neutralino. We discuss changes for the standard stau (and stop) co-annihilation, the Higgs funnel and the focus point regions. The model has potentially large lepton flavour violation in both, left and right, scalar leptons and thus allows, in principle, also for flavoured co-annihilation. We also discuss lepton flavour signals due to violating decays of the second lightest neutralino at the LHC, which can be as large as 20 fb$^{-1}$ at $\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV.
  • We consider a supersymmetric type III seesaw, where the additional heavy states are embedded into complete SU(5) representations to preserve gauge coupling unification. Complying with phenomenological and experimental constraints strongly tightens the viable parameter space of the model. In particular, one expects very characteristic signals of lepton flavour violation both at low-energies and at the LHC, which offer the possibility of falsifying the model.
  • We study the impact of a type-I SUSY seesaw concerning lepton flavour violation (LFV) both at low-energies and at the LHC. The study of the di-lepton invariant mass distribution at the LHC allows to reconstruct some of the masses of the different sparticles involved in a decay chain. In particular, the combination with other observables renders feasible the reconstruction of the masses of the intermediate sleptons involved in $ \chi_2^0\to \tilde \ell \,\ell \to \ell \,\ell\,\chi_1^0$ decays. Slepton mass splittings can be either interpreted as a signal of non-universality in the SUSY soft breaking-terms (signalling a deviation from constrained scenarios as the cMSSM) or as being due to the violation of lepton flavour. In the latter case, in addition to these high-energy processes, one expects further low-energy manifestations of LFV such as radiative and three-body lepton decays. Under the assumption of a type-I seesaw as the source of neutrino masses and mixings, all these LFV observables are related. Working in the framework of the cMSSM extended by three right-handed neutrino superfields, we conduct a systematic analysis addressing the simultaneous implications of the SUSY seesaw for both high- and low-energy lepton flavour violation. We discuss how the confrontation of slepton mass splittings as observed at the LHC and low-energy LFV observables may provide important information about the underlying mechanism of LFV.
  • We study the impact of a type-I SUSY seesaw concerning lepton flavour violation (LFV) at low-energies and at the LHC. At the LHC, $ \chi_2^0\to \tilde \ell \,\ell \to \ell \,\ell\,\chi_1^0$ decays, in combination with other observables, render feasible the reconstruction of the masses of the intermediate sleptons, and hence the study of $\ell_i - \ell_j$ mass differences. If interpreted as being due to the violation of lepton flavour, high-energy observables, such as large slepton mass splittings and flavour violating neutralino and slepton decays, are expected to be accompanied by low-energy manifestations of LFV such as radiative and three-body lepton decays. We discuss how to devise strategies based in the interplay of slepton mass splittings as might be observed at the LHC and low-energy LFV observables to derive important information on the underlying mechanism of LFV.
  • We study a supersymmetric version of the seesaw mechanism type-III. The model consists of the MSSM particle content plus three copies of 24 superfields. The fermionic part of the SU(2) triplet contained in the 24 is responsible for the type-III seesaw, which is used to explain the observed neutrino masses and mixings. Complete copies of 24 are introduced to maintain gauge coupling unification. These additional states change the beta functions of the gauge couplings above the seesaw scale. Using mSUGRA boundary conditions we calculate the resulting supersymmetric mass spectra at the electro-weak scale using full 2-loop renormalization group equations. We show that the resulting spectrum can be quite different compared to the usual mSUGRA spectrum. We discuss how this might be used to obtain information on the seesaw scale from mass measurements. Constraints on the model space due to limits on lepton flavour violating decays are discussed. The main constraints come from the bounds on the decay mu to e and gamma but there are also regions where the decay tau to mu and gamma gives stronger constraints. We also calculate the regions allowed by the dark matter constraint. For the sake of completeness, we compare our results with those for the supersymmetric seesaw type-II and, to some extent, with type-I.
  • We study the phenomenology of a supersymmetric left-right model, assuming minimal supergravity boundary conditions. Both left-right and (B-L) symmetries are broken at an energy scale close to, but significantly below the GUT scale. Neutrino data is explained via a seesaw mechanism. We calculate the RGEs for superpotential and soft parameters complete at 2-loop order. At low energies lepton flavour violation (LFV) and small, but potentially measurable mass splittings in the charged scalar lepton sector appear, due to the RGE running. Different from the supersymmetric 'pure seesaw' models, both, LFV and slepton mass splittings, occur not only in the left- but also in the right slepton sector. Especially, ratios of LFV slepton decays, such as Br(${\tilde\tau}_R \to \mu \chi^0_1$)/Br(${\tilde\tau}_L \to \mu \chi^0_1$) are sensitive to the ratio of (B-L) and left-right symmetry breaking scales. Also the model predicts a polarization asymmetry of the outgoing positrons in the decay $\mu^+ \to e^+ \gamma$, A ~ [0,1], which differs from the pure seesaw 'prediction' A=1$. Observation of any of these signals allows to distinguish this model from any of the three standard, pure (mSugra) seesaw setups.
  • We propose an A_4 flavor-symmetric SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1) seesaw model where lepton number is broken spontaneously. A consistent two-zero texture pattern of neutrino masses and mixing emerges from the interplay of type-I and type-II seesaw contributions, with important phenomenological predictions. We show that, if the Majoron becomes massive, such seesaw scenario provides a viable candidate for decaying dark matter, consistent with cosmic microwave background lifetime constraints that follow from current WMAP observations. We also calculate the sub-leading one-loop-induced decay into photons which leads to a mono-energetic emission line that may be observed in future X-ray missions such as Xenia.
  • We study neutrino masses in the framework of the supersymmetric inverse seesaw model. Different from the non-supersymmetric version a minimal realization with just one pair of singlets is sufficient to explain all neutrino data. We compute the neutrino mass matrix up to 1-loop order and show how neutrino data can be described in terms of the model parameters. We then calculate rates for lepton flavour violating (LFV) processes, such as $\mu \to e \gamma$, and chargino decays to singlet scalar neutrinos. The latter decays are potentially observable at the LHC and show a characteristic decay pattern dictated by the same parameters which generate the observed large neutrino angles.
  • We calculate the relic density of the lightest neutralino in a supersymmetric seesaw type-II (``triplet seesaw'') model with minimal supergravity boundary conditions at the GUT scale. The presence of a triplet below the GUT scale, required to explain measured neutrino data in this setup, leads to a characteristic deformation of the sparticle spectrum with respect to the pure mSugra expectations, affecting the calculated relic dark matter (DM) density. We discuss how the DM allowed regions in the (m_0,M_{1/2}) plane change as a function of the (type-II) seesaw scale. We also compare the constraints imposed on the models parameter space form upper limits on lepton flavour violating (LFV) decays to those imposed by DM. Finally, we briefly comment on uncertainties in the calculation of the relic neutralino density due to uncertainties in the measured top and bottom masses.
  • We reconsider the role that the possible detection of lepton flavour violating (LFV) decays of supersymmetric particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can play in helping reconstruct the underlying neutrino mass generation mechanism within the simplest high-scale minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) seesaw schemes. We study in detail the LFV scalar tau decays at the LHC, assuming that the observed neutrino masses arise either through the pure type-I or the simpler type-II seesaw mechanism. We perform a scan over the mSUGRA parameter space in order to identify regions where lepton flavour violating decays of $\chi^0_2$ can be maximized, while respecting current low-energy constraints, such as those coming from the bounds on Br($\mu \to e \gamma$). We estimate the cross section for $\chi^0_2 \to \chi^0_1 + \tau + \mu $. Though insufficient for a full reconstruction of the seesaw, the search for LFV decays of supersymmetric states at the LHC brings complementary information to that coming from low energy neutrino oscillation experiments and LFV searches.
  • The most general supersymmetric seesaw mechanism has too many parameters to be predictive and thus can not be excluded by any measurements of lepton flavour violating (LFV) processes. We focus on the simplest version of the type-I seesaw mechanism assuming minimal supergravity boundary conditions. We compute branching ratios for the LFV scalar tau decays, ${\tilde \tau}_2 \to (e,\mu) + \chi^0_1$, as well as loop-induced LFV decays at low energy, such as $l_i \to l_j + \gamma$ and $l_i \to 3 l_j$, exploring their sensitivity to the unknown seesaw parameters. We find some simple, extreme scenarios for the unknown right-handed parameters, where ratios of LFV branching ratios correlate with neutrino oscillation parameters. If the overall mass scale of the left neutrinos and the value of the reactor angle were known, the study of LFV allows, in principle, to extract information about the so far unknown right-handed neutrino parameters.
  • Current neutrino oscillation data indicate the existence of two large lepton mixing angles, while Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements are all small. Here we show how supersymmetric SO(10) with extra chiral singlets can easily reconcile large lepton mixing angles with small quark mixing angles within the framework of the successful Fritzsch ansatz. Moreover we show how this is fully consistent with the thermal leptogenesis scenario, avoiding the so-called gravitino problem. A sizeable asymmetry can be generated at relatively low scales. We present our results in terms of the leptonic CP violation parameter that characterizes neutrino oscillations.
  • We study the stability of the Harrison-Perkins-Scott (HPS) mixing pattern, assumed to hold at some high energy scale, against supersymmetric radiative corrections. We work in the framework of a reference minimal supergravity model (mSUGRA) where supersymmetry breaking is universal and flavor-blind at unification. The radiative corrections considered include both RGE running as well as threshold effects. We find that in this case the solar mixing angle can only increase with respect to the HPS reference value, while the atmospheric and reactor mixing angles remain essentially stable. Deviations from the solar angle HPS prediction towards lower values would signal novel contributions from physics beyond the simplest mSUGRA model.
  • We study the mass spectra, production and decay properties of the lightest supersymmetric CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons in models with spontaneously broken R-parity (SBRP). We compare the resulting mass spectra with expectations of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), stressing that the model obeys the upper bound on the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass. We discuss how the presence of the additional scalar singlet states affects the Higgs production cross sections, both for the Bjorken process and the "associated production". The main phenomenological novelty with respect to the MSSM comes from the fact that the spontaneous breaking of lepton number leads to the existence of the majoron, denoted J, which opens new decay channels for supersymmetric Higgs bosons. We find that the invisible decays of CP-even Higgses can be dominant, while those of the CP-odd bosons may also be sizeable.
  • We review supersymmetric models where R-parity is broken either explicitly or spontaneously. The simplest unified extension of the MSSM with explicit bilinear R--Parity violation provides a predictive scheme for neutrino masses and mixings which can account for the observed atmospheric and solar neutrino anomalies. Despite the smallness of neutrino masses R-parity violation is observable at present and future high-energy colliders, providing an unambiguous cross-check of the model. This model can be shown to be an effective model for the, more theoretically satisfying, spontaneous broken theory. The main difference in this last case is the appearance of a massless particle, the majoron, that can modify the decay modes of the Higgs boson, making it decay invisibly most of the time.
  • Leptoquarks arise naturally in models attempting the unification of the quark and lepton sectors of the standard model of particle physics. Such particles could be produced in the interaction of high energy quasi-horizontal cosmic neutrinos with the atmosphere, via their direct coupling to a quark and a neutrino. The hadronic decay products of the leptoquark, and possibly its leptonic decay products would originate an extensive air shower, observable in large cosmic ray experiments. In this letter, the sensitivity of present and planned very high energy cosmic ray experiments to the production of leptoquarks of different types is estimated and discussed.
  • The Higgs boson may decay mainly to an invisible mode characterized by missing energy, instead of the Standard Model channels. This is a generic feature of many models where neutrino masses arise from the spontaneous breaking of ungauged lepton number at relatively low scales, such as spontaneously broken R-parity models. Taking these models as framework, we reanalyze this striking suggestion in view of the recent data on neutrino oscillations that indicate non-zero neutrino masses. We show that, despite the smallness of neutrino masses, the Higgs boson can decay mainly to the invisible Goldstone boson associated to the spontaneous breaking of lepton number. This requires a gauge singlet superfield coupling to the electroweak doublet Higgses, as in the Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) scenario for solving the $\mu$-problem. The search for invisibly decaying Higgs bosons should be taken into account in the planning of future accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Next Linear Collider.