• We map the distribution and properties of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as traced by diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) detected in near-infrared stellar spectra from the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Focusing exclusively on the strongest DIB in the H-band, at ~1.527 microns, we present a projected map of the DIB absorption field in the Galactic plane, using a set of about 60,000 sightlines that reach up to 15 kpc from the Sun and probe up to 30 magnitudes of visual extinction. The strength of this DIB is linearly correlated with dust reddening over three orders of magnitude in both DIB equivalent width (W_DIB) and extinction, with a power law index of 1.01 +/- 0.01, a mean relationship of W_DIB/A_V = 0.1 Angstrom mag^-1, and a dispersion of ~0.05 Angstrom mag^-1 at extinctions characteristic of the Galactic midplane. These properties establish this DIB as a powerful, independent probe of dust extinction over a wide range of A_V values. The subset of about 14,000 robustly detected DIB features have an exponential W_DIB distribution. We empirically determine the intrinsic rest wavelength of this transition to be lambda_0 = 15,272.42 Angstrom, and then calculate absolute radial velocities of the carrier, which display the kinematical signature of the rotating Galactic disk. We probe the DIB carrier distribution in three dimensions and show that it can be characterized by an exponential disk model with a scaleheight of about 100 pc and a scalelength of about 5 kpc. Finally, we show that the DIB distribution also traces large-scale Galactic structures, including the central long bar and the warp of the outer disk.
  • The SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a three year survey that is collecting 100,000 high-resolution spectra in the near-IR across multiple Galactic populations. To derive stellar parameters and chemical compositions from this massive data set, the APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) has been developed. Here, we describe empirical calibrations of stellar parameters presented in the first SDSS-III APOGEE data release (DR10). These calibrations were enabled by observations of 559 stars in 20 globular and open clusters. The cluster observations were supplemented by observations of stars in NASA's Kepler field that have well determined surface gravities from asteroseismic analysis. We discuss the accuracy and precision of the derived stellar parameters, considering especially effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity; we also briefly discuss the derived results for the abundances of the alpha-elements, carbon, and nitrogen. Overall, we find that ASPCAP achieves reasonably accurate results for temperature and metallicity, but suffers from systematic errors in surface gravity. We derive calibration relations that bring the raw ASPCAP results into better agreement with independently determined stellar parameters. The internal scatter of ASPCAP parameters within clusters suggests that, metallicities are measured with a precision better than 0.1 dex, effective temperatures better than 150 K, and surface gravities better than 0.2 dex. The understanding provided by the clusters and Kepler giants on the current accuracy and precision will be invaluable for future improvements of the pipeline.
  • The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.
  • We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object NIR APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations are used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey and results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that is publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present RVs and vsini of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsini precision of ~2 km/s and a measurement floor at vsini = 4 km/s. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for vsini and RV variability (at ~100-200 m/s), and will advance the target selection for planned RV and photometric searches for low mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as HPF, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and AO imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution H-band APOGEE spectra provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and RVs for over 1400 stars spanning spectral types of M0-L0, providing the largest set of NIR M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsini values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we hope to achieve a relative velocity precision floor of 50 m/s for bright M dwarfs. We present preliminary results of this telluric modeling technique in this paper.
  • Forty new low mass members with spectral types ranging from M4-M9 have been confirmed in the Orion Molecular Cloud 2/3 region. Through deep, I, z', J, H, K photometry of a 20' x 20' field in OMC 2/3, we selected brown dwarf candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. Low resolution far-red and near-infrared spectra were obtained for the candidates, and 19 young brown dwarfs in the OMC 2/3 region are confirmed. They exhibit spectral types of M6.5-M9, corresponding to approximate masses of 0.075-0.015 M_solar using the evolutionary models of Baraffe et al. (1998). At least one of these bona fide young brown dwarfs has strong Halpha emission, indicating that it is actively accreting. In addition, we confirm 21 new low mass members with spectral types of M4-M6, corresponding to approximate masses of 0.35-0.10 M_solar in OMC 2/3. By comparing pre-main sequence tracks to the positions of the members in the H-R diagram, we find that most of the brown dwarfs are less than 1 Myr, but find a number of low mass stars with inferred ages greater than 3 Myr. The discrepancy in the stellar and substellar ages is due to our selection of only low luminosity sources; however, the presence of such objects implies the presence of an age spread in the OMC 2/3 region. We discuss possible reasons for this apparent age spread.
  • We use the previously-identified 15 infrared star-cluster counterparts to X-ray point sources in the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/4039 (the Antennae) to study the relationship between total cluster mass and X-ray binary number. This significant population of X-Ray/IR associations allows us to perform, for the first time, a statistical study of X-ray point sources and their environments. We define a quantity, \eta, relating the fraction of X-ray sources per unit mass as a function of cluster mass in the Antennae. We compute cluster mass by fitting spectral evolutionary models to K_s luminosity. Considering that this method depends on cluster age, we use four different age distributions to explore the effects of cluster age on the value of \eta and find it varies by less than a factor of four. We find a mean value of \eta for these different distributions of \eta = 1.7 x 10^-8 M_\sun^-1 with \sigma_\eta = 1.2 x 10^-8 M_\sun^-1. Performing a \chi^2 test, we demonstrate \eta could exhibit a positive slope, but that it depends on the assumed distribution in cluster ages. While the estimated uncertainties in \eta are factors of a few, we believe this is the first estimate made of this quantity to ``order of magnitude'' accuracy. We also compare our findings to theoretical models of open and globular cluster evolution, incorporating the X-ray binary fraction per cluster.
  • We present near-infrared (1.0-2.4 micron) spectra confirming the youth and cool effective temperatures of 6 brown dwarfs and low mass stars with circumstellar disks toward the Chamaeleon II and Ophiuchus star forming regions. The spectrum of one of our objects indicates that it has a spectral type of ~L1, making it one of the latest spectral type young brown dwarfs identified to date. Comparing spectra of young brown dwarfs, field dwarfs, and giant stars, we define a 1.49-1.56 micron H2O index capable of determining spectral type to within 1 sub-type, independent of gravity. We have also defined an index based on the 1.14 micron sodium feature that is sensitive to gravity, but only weakly dependent on spectral type for field dwarfs. Our 1.14 micron Na index can be used to distinguish young cluster members (t <~ 5 Myr) from young field dwarfs, both of which may have the triangular H-band continuum shape which persists for at least tens of Myr. Using effective temperatures determined from the spectral types of our objects along with luminosities derived from near and mid-infrared photometry, we place our objects on the H-R diagram and overlay evolutionary models to estimate the masses and ages of our young sources. Three of our sources have inferred ages (t ~= 10-30 Myr) significantly older than the median stellar age of their parent clouds (1-3 Myr). For these three objects, we derive masses ~3 times greater than expected for 1-3 Myr old brown dwarfs with the bolometric luminosities of our sources. The large discrepancies in the inferred masses and ages determined using two separate, yet reasonable methods, emphasize the need for caution when deriving or exploiting brown dwarf mass and age estimates.
  • We present the first mid-infrared spectra of brown dwarfs, together with observations of a low-mass star. Our targets are the M3.5 dwarf GJ 1001A, the L8 dwarf DENIS-P J0255-4700, and the T1/T6 binary system epsilon Indi Ba/Bb. As expected, the mid-infrared spectral morphology of these objects changes rapidly with spectral class due to the changes in atmospheric chemistry resulting from their differing effective temperatures and atmospheric structures. By taking advantage of the unprecedented sensitivity of the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope we have detected the 7.8 micron methane and 10 micron ammonia bands for the first time in brown dwarf spectra.
  • CorMASS (Cornell Massachusetts Slit Spectrograph) is a compact, low-resolution (R=300), double-pass prism cross-dispersed near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph in operation on the Palomar Observatory 60-inch telescope. Its 2-dimensional spectral format provides simultaneous coverage from lambda ~ 0.75 microns to lambda ~ 2.5 microns (z'JHK bands). A remotely operated cold flip mirror permits its NICMOS3 detector to function as a K_s slit viewer to assist object placement into the 2 arcsec x 15 arcsec slit. CorMASS was primarily designed for the rapid spectral classification of low-mass stellar and sub-stellar objects identified by the Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). CorMASS' efficiency and resolution also make it a versatile instrument for the spectral observation and classification of many other types of bright objects (K<14) including quasars, novae, and emission line objects.