• Using a sample of 4 galaxy clusters at $1.35 < z < 1.65$ and 10 galaxy clusters at $0.85 < z < 1.35$, we measure the environmental quenching timescale, $t_Q$, corresponding to the time required after a galaxy is accreted by a cluster for it to fully cease star formation. Cluster members are selected by a photometric-redshift criterion, and categorized as star-forming, quiescent, or intermediate according to their dust-corrected rest-frame colors and magnitudes. We employ a "delayed-then-rapid" quenching model that relates a simulated cluster mass accretion rate to the observed numbers of each type of galaxy in the cluster to constrain $t_Q$. For galaxies of mass $M_* \gtrsim 10^{10.5}~ \mathrm{M}_\odot$, we find a quenching timescale of $t_Q=$ 1.24 Gyr in the $z\sim1.5$ cluster sample, and $t_Q=$ 1.50 Gyr at $z\sim1$. Using values drawn from the literature, we compare the redshift evolution of $t_Q$ to timescales predicted for different physical quenching mechanisms. We find $t_Q$ to depend on host halo mass such that quenching occurs over faster timescales in clusters relative to groups, suggesting that properties of the host halo are responsible for quenching high-mass galaxies. Between $z=0$ and $z=1.5$, we find that $t_Q$ evolves faster than the molecular gas depletion timescale and slower than an SFR-outflow timescale, but is consistent with the evolution of the dynamical time. This suggests that environmental quenching in these galaxies is driven by the motion of satellites relative to the cluster environment, although due to uncertainties in the atomic gas budget at high redshift, we cannot rule out quenching due to simple gas depletion.
  • Using integral field spectroscopy we investigate the kinematic properties of 35 massive centrally-dense and compact star-forming galaxies (${\log{\overline{M}_*}}=11.1$, $\log{(\Sigma_\mathrm{1kpc})}>9.5$, $\log{(M_\ast/r_e^{1.5})}>10.3$) at $z\sim0.7-3.7$ within the KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$survey. We spatially resolve 23 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and find that the majority are dominated by rotational motions with velocities ranging from {$95-500$ km s$^{-1}$}. The range of rotation velocities is reflected in a similar range of integrated H$\alpha$ linewidths, $75-400$ km s$^{-1}$, consistent with the kinematic properties of mass-matched extended galaxies from the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample. The fraction of compact SFGs that are classified as `rotation-dominated' or `disk-like' also mirrors the fractions of the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample. We show that integrated line-of-sight gas velocity dispersions from KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ are best approximated by a linear combination of their rotation and turbulent velocities with a lesser but still significant contribution from galactic scale winds. The H$\alpha$ exponential disk sizes of compact SFGs are on average $2.5\pm0.2$ kpc, $1-2\times$ the continuum sizes, in agreement with previous work. The compact SFGs have a $1.4\times$ higher AGN incidence than the full KMOS$^\mathrm{3D}$ sample at fixed stellar mass with average AGN fraction of 76\%. Given their high and centrally concentrated stellar masses as well as stellar to dynamical mass ratios close to unity, the compact SFGs are likely to have low molecular gas fractions and to quench on a short time scale unless replenished with inflowing gas. The rotation in these compact systems suggests that their direct descendants are rotating passive galaxies.
  • We investigate the stellar mass and baryonic mass Tully-Fisher relations (TFRs) of massive star-forming disk galaxies at redshift z~2.3 and z~0.9 as part of the KMOS^3D integral field spectroscopy survey. Our spatially resolved data allow reliable modelling of individual galaxies, including the effect of pressure support on the inferred gravitational potential. At fixed circular velocity, we find higher baryonic masses and similar stellar masses at z~2.3 as compared to z~0.9. Together with the decreasing gas-to-stellar mass ratios with decreasing redshift, this implies that the contribution of dark matter to the dynamical mass at the galaxy scale increases towards lower redshift. A comparison to local relations reveals a negative evolution of the stellar and baryonic TFR zero-points from z=0 to z~0.9, no evolution of the stellar TFR zero-point from z~0.9 to z~2.3, and a positive evolution of the baryonic TFR zero-point from z~0.9 to z~2.3. We discuss a toy model of disk galaxy evolution to explain the observed, non-monotonic TFR evolution, taking into account the empirically motivated redshift dependencies of galactic gas fractions, and of the relative amount of baryons to dark matter on galaxy and halo scales.
  • We exploit the deep resolved Halpha kinematic data from the KMOS^3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys to examine the largely unexplored outer disk kinematics of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) out to the peak of cosmic star formation. Our sample contains 101 SFGs representative of the more massive (9.3 < log(M*/Msun) < 11.5) main sequence population at 0.6<z<2.6. Through a novel stacking approach we are able to constrain a representative rotation curve extending out to ~4 effective radii. This average rotation curve exhibits a significant drop in rotation velocity beyond the turnover, with a slope of Delta(V)/Delta(R) = $-0.26^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$ in units of normalized coordinates V/V_max and R/R_turn. This result confirms that the fall-off seen previously in some individual galaxies is a common feature of our sample of high-z disks. We show that this outer fall-off strikingly deviates from the flat or mildly rising rotation curves of local spiral galaxies of similar masses. We furthermore compare our data with models including baryons and dark matter demonstrating that the falling stacked rotation curve can be explained by a high mass fraction of baryons relative to the total dark matter halo (m_d>~0.05) in combination with a sizeable level of pressure support in the outer disk. These findings are in agreement with recent studies demonstrating that star-forming disks at high redshift are strongly baryon dominated within the disk scale, and furthermore suggest that pressure gradients caused by large turbulent gas motions are present even in their outer disks. We demonstrate that these results are largely independent of our model assumptions such as the presence of a central stellar bulge, the effect of adiabatic contraction at fixed m_d, and variations in the concentration parameter.
  • In cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark matter halo. In the local Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius. Comparison between the dynamical mass and the sum of stellar and cold gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon factions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (stellar initial mass function, calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive, high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early Universe efficiently condensed at the centres of dark matter halos when gas fractions were high, and dark matter was less concentrated. [Abridged]
  • We present gravitational lens models of the multiply imaged quasar DES J0408-5354, recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, with the aim of interpreting its remarkable quad-like configuration. We first model the DES single-epoch $grizY$ images as a superposition of a lens galaxy and four point-like objects, obtaining spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and relative positions for the objects. Three of the point sources (A,B,D) have SEDs compatible with the discovery quasar spectra, while the faintest point-like image (G2/C) shows significant reddening and a `grey' dimming of $\approx0.8$mag. In order to understand the lens configuration, we fit different models to the relative positions of A,B,D. Models with just a single deflector predict a fourth image at the location of G2/C but considerably brighter and bluer. The addition of a small satellite galaxy ($R_{\rm E}\approx0.2$") in the lens plane near the position of G2/C suppresses the flux of the fourth image and can explain both the reddening and grey dimming. All models predict a main deflector with Einstein radius between $1.7"$ and $2.0",$ velocity dispersion $267-280$km/s and enclosed mass $\approx 6\times10^{11}M_{\odot},$ even though higher resolution imaging data are needed to break residual degeneracies in model parameters. The longest time-delay (B-A) is estimated as $\approx 85$ (resp. $\approx125$) days by models with (resp. without) a perturber near G2/C. The configuration and predicted time-delays of J0408-5354 make it an excellent target for follow-up aimed at understanding the source quasar host galaxy and substructure in the lens, and measuring cosmological parameters. We also discuss some lessons learnt from J0408-5354 on lensed quasar finding strategies, due to its chromaticity and morphology.
  • We exploit deep integral-field spectroscopic observations with KMOS/VLT of 240 star-forming disks at 0.6 < z < 2.6 to dynamically constrain their mass budget. Our sample consists of massive ($\gtrsim 10^{9.8} M_\odot$) galaxies with sizes $R_e \gtrsim 2$ kpc. By contrasting the observed velocity and dispersion profiles to dynamical models, we find that on average the stellar content contributes $32^{+8}_{-7}\%$ of the total dynamical mass, with a significant spread among galaxies (68th percentile range f_star ~ 18 - 62%). Including molecular gas as inferred from CO- and dust-based scaling relations, the estimated baryonic mass adds up to $56^{+17}_{-12}\%$ of total for the typical galaxy in our sample, reaching ~ 90% at z > 2. We conclude that baryons make up most of the mass within the disk regions of high-redshift star-forming disk galaxies, with typical disks at z > 2 being strongly baryon-dominated within $R_e$. Substantial object-to-object variations in both stellar and baryonic mass fractions are observed among the galaxies in our sample, larger than what can be accounted for by the formal uncertainties in their respective measurements. In both cases, the mass fractions correlate most strongly with measures of surface density. High $\Sigma_{star}$ galaxies feature stellar mass fractions closer to unity, and systems with high inferred gas or baryonic surface densities leave less room for additional mass components other than stars and molecular gas. Our findings can be interpreted as more extended disks probing further (and more compact disks probing less far) into the dark matter halos that host them.
  • We analyze the angular momenta of massive star forming galaxies (SFGs) at the peak of the cosmic star formation epoch (z~0.8-2.6). Our sample of ~360 log(M*/Msun) ~ 9.3-11.8 SFGs is mainly based on the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys of H$\alpha$ kinematics, and collectively provides a representative subset of the massive star forming population. The inferred halo scale angular momentum distribution is broadly consistent with that theoretically predicted for their dark matter halos, in terms of mean spin parameter <$\lambda$> ~ 0.037 and its dispersion ($\sigma_{log(\lambda)}$~0.2). Spin parameters correlate with the disk radial scale, and with their stellar surface density, but do not depend significantly on halo mass, stellar mass, or redshift. Our data thus support the long-standing assumption that on average, even at high redshifts, the specific angular momentum of disk galaxies reflects that of their dark matter halos (j_d = j_DM). The lack of correlation between $\lambda$ x (j_d/j_DM) and the nuclear stellar density $\Sigma_{*}$(1kpc) favors a scenario where disk-internal angular momentum redistribution leads to "compaction" inside massive high-redshift disks. For our sample, the inferred average stellar-to-dark matter mass ratio is ~2%, consistent with abundance matching results. Including the molecular gas, the total baryonic disk-to-dark matter mass ratio is ~5% for halos near $10^{12}$ Msun, which corresponds to 31% of the cosmologically available baryons, implying that high-redshift disks are strongly baryon dominated.
  • We present the KMOS^3D survey, a new integral field survey of over 600 galaxies at 0.7<z<2.7 using KMOS at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The KMOS^3D survey utilizes synergies with multi-wavelength ground and space-based surveys to trace the evolution of spatially-resolved kinematics and star formation from a homogeneous sample over 5 Gyrs of cosmic history. Targets, drawn from a mass-selected parent sample from the 3D-HST survey, cover the star formation-stellar mass ($M_*$) and rest-frame $(U-V)-M_*$ planes uniformly. We describe the selection of targets, the observations, and the data reduction. In the first year of data we detect Halpha emission in 191 $M_*=3\times10^{9}-7\times10^{11}$ Msun galaxies at z=0.7-1.1 and z=1.9-2.7. In the current sample 83% of the resolved galaxies are rotation-dominated, determined from a continuous velocity gradient and $v_{rot}/\sigma>1$, implying that the star-forming 'main sequence' (MS) is primarily composed of rotating galaxies at both redshift regimes. When considering additional stricter criteria, the Halpha kinematic maps indicate at least ~70% of the resolved galaxies are disk-like systems. Our high-quality KMOS data confirm the elevated velocity dispersions reported in previous IFS studies at z>0.7. For rotation-dominated disks, the average intrinsic velocity dispersion decreases by a factor of two from 50 km/s at z~2.3 to 25 km/s at z~0.9 while the rotational velocities at the two redshifts are comparable. Combined with existing results spanning z~0-3, disk velocity dispersions follow an approximate (1+z) evolution that is consistent with the dependence of velocity dispersion on gas fractions predicted by marginally-stable disk theory.
  • In this paper we follow up on our previous detection of nuclear ionized outflows in the most massive (log(M*/Msun) >= 10.9) z~1-3 star-forming galaxies (Forster Schreiber et al.), by increasing the sample size by a factor of six (to 44 galaxies above log(M*/Msun) >= 10.9) from a combination of the SINS/zC-SINF, LUCI, GNIRS, and KMOS^3D spectroscopic surveys. We find a fairly sharp onset of the incidence of broad nuclear emission (FWHM in the Ha, [NII], and [SII] lines ~ 450-5300 km/s), with large [NII]/Ha ratios, above log(M*/Msun) ~ 10.9, with about two thirds of the galaxies in this mass range exhibiting this component. Broad nuclear components near and above the Schechter mass are similarly prevalent above and below the main sequence of star-forming galaxies, and at z~1 and ~2. The line ratios of the nuclear component are fit by excitation from active galactic nuclei (AGN), or by a combination of shocks and photoionization. The incidence of the most massive galaxies with broad nuclear components is at least as large as that of AGNs identified by X-ray, optical, infrared or radio indicators. The mass loading of the nuclear outflows is near unity. Our findings provide compelling evidence for powerful, high-duty cycle, AGN-driven outflows near the Schechter mass, and acting across the peak of cosmic galaxy formation.
  • The SAGE-Spec Spitzer Legacy program is a spectroscopic follow-up to the SAGE-LMC photometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present an overview of SAGE-Spec and some of its first results. The SAGE-Spec program aims to study the life cycle of gas and dust in the Large Magellanic Cloud, and to provide information essential to the classification of the point sources observed in the earlier SAGE-LMC photometric survey. We acquired 224.6 hours of observations using the InfraRed Spectrograph and the SED mode of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer. The SAGE-Spec data, along with archival Spitzer spectroscopy of objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud, are reduced and delivered to the community. We discuss the observing strategy, the specific data reduction pipelines applied and the dissemination of data products to the scientific community. Initial science results include the first detection of an extragalactic "21 um" feature towards an evolved star and elucidation of the nature of disks around RV Tauri stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Towards some young stars, ice features are observed in absorption. We also serendipitously observed a background quasar, at a redshift of z~0.14, which appears to be host-less.
  • We describe the design, fabrication, and measurement of a cavity opto-mechanical system consisting of two nanobeams of silicon nitride in the near-field of each other, forming a so-called "zipper" cavity. A photonic crystal patterning is applied to the nanobeams to localize optical and mechanical energy to the same cubic-micron-scale volume. The picrogram-scale mass of the structure, along with the strong per-photon optical gradient force, results in a giant optical spring effect. In addition, a novel damping regime is explored in which the small heat capacity of the zipper cavity results in blue-detuned opto-mechanical damping.
  • The magnetotransport properties of single crystals of the highly anisotropic layered metal LaSb2 are reported in magnetic fields up to 45 T with fields oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the layers. Below 10 K the perpendicular magnetoresistance of LaSb2} becomes temperature independent and is characterized by a 100-fold linear increase in resistance between 0 and 45 T with no evidence of quantum oscillations down to 50 mK. The Hall resistivity is hole-like and gives a high field carrier density of n ~ 3x10^20 cm^-3. The feasibility of using LaSb2 for magnetic field sensors is discussed.