• An electronically coarse-grained model for water reveals a persistent vestige of the liquid-gas transition deep into the supercritical region. A crossover in the density dependence of the molecular dipole arises from the onset of non-percolating hydrogen bonds. The crossover points coincide with the Widom line in the scaling region but extend further, tracking the heat capacity maxima, offering evidence for liquid- and gas-like state points in a "one-phase" fluid. The effect is present even in dipole-limit models suggesting that it is common for all molecular liquids exhibiting dipole enhancement in the liquid phase.
  • In 2000, Lamb and Reichart predicted that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows occur in sufficient numbers and at sufficient brightnesses at very high redshifts (z > 5) to eventually replace quasars as the preferred probe of element formation and reionization in the early universe and to be used to characterize the star-formation history of the early universe, perhaps back to when the first stars formed. Here we report the discovery of the afterglow of GRB 050904 and the identification of GRB 050904 as the first very high redshift GRB. We measure its redshift to be 6.39(+0.11,-0.12), which is consistent with the reported spectroscopic redshift (6.29 +/- 0.01). Furthermore, just redward of Ly-alpha the flux is suppressed by a factor of three on the first night, but returns to expected levels by the fourth night. We propose that this is due to absorption by molecular hydrogen that was excited to rovibrational states by the GRB's prompt emission, but was then overtaken by the jet. Now that very high redshift GRBs have been shown to exist, and at least in this case the afterglow was very bright, observing programs that are designed to capitalize on this science will likely drive a new era of study of the early universe, using GRBs as probes.
  • An extensive series of neutron diffraction experiments and molecular dynamics simulations has shown that mixtures of methanol and water exhibit extended structures in solution despite the components being fully miscible in all proportions. Of particular interest is a concentration region(methanol mole fraction between 0.27 and 0.54) where {\em both} methanol and water appear to form separate, percolating networks. This is the concentration range where many transport properties and thermodynamic excess functions reach extremal values. The observed concentration dependence of several of these material properties of the solution may therefore have a structural origin.
  • Molecular segregation in methanol-water mixtures is studied across a wide concentration range as a function of temperature and pressure. Cluster distributions obtained from both neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations point to significantly enhanced segregation as the mixtures are cooled or compressed. This evolution toward greater molecular heterogenity in the mixture accounts for the observed changes in the water-water radial distribution function and there are indications also of a change in the topology of the water clusters. The observed behavior is consistent with an approach to an upper critical solution point. Such a point would appear to be ``hidden'' below the freezing line, thereby precluding observation of the two-fluid region.
  • We study the phase ordering colloids suspended in a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal below the clearing point Tni and the resulting aggregated structure. Small (150nm) PMMA particles are dispersed in a classical liquid crystal matrix, 5CB or MBBA. With the help of confocal microscopy we show that small colloid particles densely aggregate on thin interfaces surrounding large volumes of clean nematic liquid, thus forming an open cellular structure, with the characteristic size of 10-100 micron inversely proportional to the colloid concentration. A simple theoretical model, based on the Landau mean-field treatment, is developed to describe the continuous phase separation and the mechanism of cellular structure formation.