• The nearby and young M star AU Mic is surrounded by a debris disk in which we previously identified a series of large-scale arch-like structures that have never been seen before in any other debris disk and that move outward at high velocities. We initiated a monitoring program with the following objectives: 1) track the location of the structures and better constrain their projected speeds, 2) search for new features emerging closer in, and ultimately 3) understand the mechanism responsible for the motion and production of the disk features. AU Mic was observed at 11 different epochs between August 2014 and October 2017 with the IR camera and spectrograph of SPHERE. These high-contrast imaging data were processed with a variety of angular, spectral, and polarimetric differential imaging techniques to reveal the faintest structures in the disk. We measured the projected separations of the features in a systematic way for all epochs. We also applied the very same measurements to older observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with the visible cameras STIS and ACS. The main outcomes of this work are 1) the recovery of the five southeastern broad arch-like structures we identified in our first study, and confirmation of their fast motion (projected speed in the range 4-12 km/s); 2) the confirmation that the very first structures observed in 2004 with ACS are indeed connected to those observed later with STIS and now SPHERE; 3) the discovery of two new very compact structures at the northwest side of the disk (at 0.40" and 0.55" in May 2015) that move to the southeast at low speed; and 4) the identification of a new arch-like structure that might be emerging at the southeast side at about 0.4" from the star (as of May 2016). Abridged.
  • White dwarf WD 1145+017 is orbited by several clouds of dust, possibly emanating from actively disintegrating bodies. These dust clouds reveal themselves through deep, broad, and evolving transits in the star's light curve. Here, we report two epochs of multi-wavelength photometric observations of WD 1145+017, including several filters in the optical, K$_\mathrm{s}$ and 4.5 $\mu$m bands in 2016 and 2017. The observed transit depths are different at these wavelengths. However, after correcting for excess dust emission at K$_\mathrm{s}$ and 4.5 $\mu$m, we find the transit depths for the white dwarf itself are the same at all wavelengths, at least to within the observational uncertainties of $\sim$5%-10%. From this surprising result, and under the assumption of low optical depth dust clouds, we conclude that there is a deficit of small particles (with radii $s \lesssim$ 1.5 $\mu$m) in the transiting material. We propose a model wherein only large particles can survive the high equilibrium temperature environment corresponding to 4.5 hr orbital periods around WD 1145+017, while small particles sublimate rapidly. In addition, we evaluate dust models that are permitted by our measurements of infrared emission.
  • We report the discovery of the sixth known eclipsing double white dwarf (WD) system, SDSS J1152+0248, with a 2.3968 +/- 0.0003 h orbital period, in data from the Kepler Mission's K2 continuation. Analysing and modelling the K2 data together with ground-based fast photometry, spectroscopy, and radial-velocity measurements, we determine that the primary is a DA-type WD with mass M1 = 0.47 +/- 0.11 Msun, radius R1 = 0.0197 +/- 0.0035 Rsun, and cooling age t1 = 52 +/- 36 Myr. No lines are detected, to within our sensitivity, from the secondary WD, but it is likely also of type DA. Its central surface brightness, as measured from the secondary eclipse, is 0.31 of the primary's surface brightness. Its mass, radius, and cooling age, respectively, are M2 = 0.44 +/- 0.09 Msun, R2 = 0.0223 +0.0064 -0.0050 Rsun, and t2 = 230 +/- 100 Myr. SDSS J1152+0248 is a near twin of the double-lined eclipsing WD system CSS 41177.
  • Some circumstellar disks, called transitional or hybrid disks, present characteristics of both protoplanetary disks (significant amount of gas) and debris disks (evolved structures around young main-sequence stars, composed of second generation dust, from collisions between planetesimals). Therefore, they are an ideal astrophysical laboratory to witness the last stages of planet formation. The circumstellar disk around HD~141569A was intensively observed and resolved in the past from space but also from the ground but the recent implementation of high contrast imaging systems opens new opportunities to re-analyze this object. We analyzed Gemini archival data from the Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) obtained in 2011 in the H band, using several angular differential imaging techniques (classical ADI, LOCI, KLIP). These images reveal the complex structures of this disk with an unprecedented resolution. We also include archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images as an independent dataset to confirm these findings. Using an analysis of the inner edge of the disk, we show that the inner disk is almost axisymmetrical. The measurement of an offset towards the East observed by previous authors is likely due to the fact that the Eastern part of this disk is wider and more complex in substructure. Our precise re-analysis of the eastern side shows several structures including a splitting of the disk and a small finger detached from the inner edge on the southeast. Finally, we find that the arc at 250 AU is unlikely to be a spiral, at least not at the inclination derived from the first ring, but instead could be interpreted as a third belt at a different inclination. If the very symmetrical inner disk edge is carved by a companion, the data presented here put additional constraints on its position.
  • It has long been suspected that metal polluted white dwarfs (types DAZ, DBZ, and DZ) and white dwarfs with dusty disks possess planetary systems, but a specific physical mechanism by which planetesimals are perturbed close to a white dwarf has not yet been fully posited. In this paper we demonstrate that mass loss from a central star during post main sequence evolution can sweep planetesimals into interior mean motion resonances with a single giant planet. These planetesimals are slowly removed through chaotic excursions of eccentricity that in time create radial orbits capable of tidally disrupting the planetesimal. Numerical N-body simulations of the Solar System show that a sufficient number of planetesimals are perturbed to explain white dwarfs with both dust and metal pollution, provided other white dwarfs have more massive relic asteroid belts. Our scenario requires only one Jupiter-sized planet and a sufficient number of asteroids near its 2:1 interior mean motion resonance. Finally, we show that once a planetesimal is perturbed into a tidal crossing orbit, it will become disrupted after the first pass of the white dwarf, where a highly eccentric stream of debris forms the main reservoir for dust producing collisions. These simulations, in concert with observations of white dwarfs, place interesting limits on the frequency of planetary systems around main sequence stars, the frequency of planetesimal belts, and the probability that dust may obscure future terrestrial planet finding missions.