• We present a detailed study of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's photometric catalogs with special focus on the statistical properties of the All-sky and Medium Imaging Surveys. We introduce the concept of primaries to resolve the issue of multiple detections and follow a geometric approach to define clean catalogs with well-understood selection functions. We cross-identify the GALEX sources (GR2+3) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR6) observations, which indirectly provides an invaluable insight about the astrometric model of the UV sources and allows us to revise the band merging strategy. We derive the formal description of the GALEX footprints as well as their intersections with the SDSS coverage along with analytic calculations of their areal coverage. The crossmatch catalogs are made available for the public. We conclude by illustrating the implementation of typical selection criteria in SQL for catalog subsets geared toward statistical analyses, e.g., correlation and luminosity function studies.
  • We have studied ~2100 early-type galaxies in the SDSS DR3 which have been detected by the GALEX Medium Imaging Survey (MIS), in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.11. Combining GALEX UV photometry with corollary optical data from the SDSS, we find that, at a 95 percent confidence level, at least ~30 percent of galaxies in this sample have UV to optical colours consistent with some recent star formation within the last Gyr. In particular, galaxies with a NUV - r colour less than 5.5 are very likely to have experienced such recent star formation, taking into account the possibility of a contribution to NUV flux from the UV upturn phenomenon. We find quantitative agreement between the observations and the predictions of a semi-analytical LCDM hierarchical merger model and deduce that early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.11 have ~1 to 3 percent of their stellar mass in stars less than 1 Gyr old. The average age of this recently formed population is ~300 to 500 Myrs. We also find that monolithically evolving galaxies, where recent star formation can be driven solely by recycled gas from stellar mass loss, cannot exhibit the blue colours (NUV - r < 5.5) seen in a significant fraction (~30 percent) of our observed sample.
  • We study the ultraviolet to far-infrared (hereafter UV-to-IR) SEDs of a sample of intermediate redshift (0.2 < z < 0.7) UV-selected galaxies from the ELAIS-N1 and ELAIS-N2 fields by fitting a multi-wavelength dataset to a library of GRASIL templates. Star formation related properties of the galaxies are derived from the library of models by using the Bayesian statistics. We find a decreasing presence of galaxies with low attenuation and low total luminosity as redshift decreases, which does not hold for high total luminosity galaxies. In addition the dust attenuation of low mass galaxies increases as redshift decreases, and this trend seems to disappear for galaxies with M* > 10^11 M_sun. This result is consistent with a mass dependent evolution of the dust to gas ratio, which could be driven by a mass dependent efficiency of star formation in star forming galaxies. The specific star formation rates (SSFR) decrease with increasing stellar mass at all redshifts, and for a given stellar mass the SSFR decreases with decreasing redshift. The differences in the slope of the M*--SSFR relation found between this work and others at similar redshift could be explained by the adopted selection criteria of the samples which, for a UV selected sample, favours blue, star forming galaxies.
  • We present a study of the morphological nature of redshift z~0.7 star-forming galaxies using a combination of HST/ACS, GALEX and ground-based images of the COSMOS field. Our sample consists of 8,146 galaxies, 5,777 of which are detected in the GALEX near-ultraviolet band down to a limiting magnitude of 25.5 (AB). We make use of the UV to estimate star formation rates, correcting for the effect of dust using the UV-slope, and compute, from the ACS F814W images, the C,A,S,G,M20 morphological parameters for all objects in our sample. We observe a morphological bimodality in the galaxy population and show that it has a strong correspondence with the FUV - g color bimodality. We conclude that UV-optical color predominantly evolves concurrently with morphology. We observe many of the most star-forming galaxies to have morphologies approaching that of early-type galaxies, and interpret this as evidence that strong starburst events are linked to bulge growth and constitute a process through which galaxies can be brought from the blue to the red sequence while simultaneously modifying their morphology accordingly. We conclude that the red sequence has continued growing at z~<0.7. We also observe z~0.7 galaxies to have physical properties similar to that of local galaxies, except for higher star formation rates. Whence we infer that the dimming of star-forming galaxies is responsible for most of the evolution in the star formation rate density of the Universe since that redshift, although our data are also consistent with a mild number evolution. [abridged]
  • We select far-infrared (FIR-60 microns) and far-ultraviolet (FUV-1530 A) samples of nearby galaxies in order to discuss the biases encountered by monochromatic surveys (FIR or FUV). Very different volumes are sampled by each selection and much care is taken to apply volume corrections to all the analyses. The distributions of the bolometric luminosity of young stars are compared for both samples: they are found to be consistent with each other for galaxies of intermediate luminosities but some differences are found for high (>5 10^{10} L_sun) luminosities. The shallowness of the IRAS survey prevents us from securing comparison at low luminosities (<2 10^9 L_sun). The ratio of the total infrared (TIR) luminosity to the FUV luminosity is found to increase with the bolometric luminosity in a similar way for both samples up to 5 10^{10} L_sun. Brighter galaxies are found to have a different behavior according to their selection: the L_TIR/L_FUV ratio of the FUV-selected galaxies brighter than 5 10^{10} L_sun reaches a plateau whereas L_TIR/L_FUV continues to increase with the luminosity of bright galaxies selected in FIR. The volume-averaged specific star formation rate (SFR per unit galaxy stellar mass, SSFR) is found to decrease toward massive galaxies within each selection. The SSFR is found to be larger than that measured for optical and NIR-selected sample over the whole mass range for the FIR selection, and for masses larger than 10^{10} M_sun for the FUV selection. Luminous and massive galaxies selected in FIR appear as active as galaxies with similar characteristics detected at z ~ 0.7.
  • We present images, integrated photometry, surface-brightness and color profiles for a total of 1034 nearby galaxies recently observed by the GALEX satellite in its far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1516A) and near-ultraviolet (NUV; 2267A) bands. (...) This data set has been complemented with archival optical, near-infrared, and far-infrared fluxes and colors. We find that the integrated (FUV-K) color provides robust discrimination between elliptical and spiral/irregular galaxies and also among spiral galaxies of different sub-types. Elliptical galaxies with brighter K-band luminosities (i.e. more massive) are redder in (NUV-K) color but bluer in (FUV-NUV) than less massive ellipticals. In the case of the spiral/irregular galaxies our analysis shows the presence of a relatively tight correlation between the (FUV-NUV) color and the total infrared-to-UV ratio. The correlation found between (FUV-NUV) color and K-band luminosity (with lower luminosity objects being bluer than more luminous ones) can be explained as due to an increase in the dust content with galaxy luminosity. The images in this Atlas along with the profiles and integrated properties are publicly available through a dedicated web page at http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu/level5/GALEX_Atlas/
  • We combine data from SDSS and the GALEX and Spitzer observatories to create a sample of galaxies observed homogeneously from the UV to the Far-IR. This sample, consisting of ~460 galaxies observed spectroscopically by SDSS provides a multiwavelength (0.15-24 micron) view of obscured and unobscured star formation in nearby (z<0.3) galaxies with SFRs ranging from 0.01 to 100 M_solar/yr. We calculate a robust dust measure from the infrared to UV ratio (IRX) and explore the influence of star formation history (SFH) on the dust-UV color relation (i.e. the IRX-beta relation). We find that the UV colors of galaxies are only weakly dependent on their SFH as measured by the 4000A break. However, we find that the contributions of dust and SFH are distinguishable when colors at widely separated wavelengths (e.g. 0.23-3.6 micron) are introduced. We show this explicitly by recasting the IRX-beta relation as a more general IRX-SFH-color relation, which we examine in different projections. We also determine simple fits to this relation.
  • We use \textit{GALEX} (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) near-UV (NUV) photometry of a sample of early-type galaxies selected in \textit{SDSS} (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) to study the UV color-magnitude relation (CMR). $NUV-r$ color is an excellent tracer of even small amounts ($\sim 1$% mass fraction) of recent ($\la 1$ Gyr) star formation and so the $NUV-r$ CMR allows us to study the effect of environment on the recent star formation history. We analyze a volume-limited sample of 839 visually-inspected early-type galaxies in the redshift range $0.05 < z < 0.10$ brighter than $M_{r}$ of -21.5 with any possible emission-line or radio-selected AGN removed to avoid contamination. We find that contamination by AGN candidates and late-type interlopers highly bias any study of recent star formation in early-type galaxies and that, after removing those, our lower limit to the fraction of massive early-type galaxies showing signs of recent star formation is roughly $30 \pm 3%$ This suggests that residual star formation is common even amongst the present day early-type galaxy population. We find that the fraction of UV-bright early-type galaxies is 25% higher in low-density environments. However, the density effect is clear only in the lowest density bin. The blue galaxy fraction for the subsample of the brightest early-type galaxies however shows a very strong density dependence, in the sense that the blue galaxy fraction is lower in a higher density region.
  • This work presents the main ultraviolet (UV) and far-infrared (FIR) properties of two samples of nearby galaxies selected from the GALEX ($\lambda = 2315$\AA, hereafter NUV) and IRAS ($\lambda = 60\mu$m) surveys respectively. They are built in order to get detection at both wavelengths for most of the galaxies. Star formation rate (SFR) estimators based on the UV and FIR emissions are compared. Systematic differences are found between the SFR estimators for individual galaxies based on the NUV fluxes corrected for dust attenuation and on the total IR luminosity. A combined estimator based on NUV and IR luminosities seems to be the best proxy over the whole range of values of SFR. Although both samples present similar average values of the birthrate parameter b, their star-formation-related properties are substantially different: NUV-selected galaxies tend to show larger values of $b$ for lower masses, SFRs and dust attenuations, supporting previous scenarios for the star formation history (SFH). Conversely, about 20% of the FIR-selected galaxies show high values of $b$, SFR and NUV attenuation. These galaxies, most of them being LIRGs and ULIRGs, break down the downsizing picture for the SFH, however their relative contribution per unit volume is small in the local Universe. Finally, the cosmic SFR density of the local Universe is estimated in a consistent way from the NUV and IR luminosities.
  • We study the UV properties of a volume limited sample of early-type galaxies in the Virgo cluster combining new GALEX far- (1530 A) and near-ultraviolet (2310 A) data with spectro-photometric data available at other wavelengths. The sample includes 264 ellipticals, lenticulars and dwarfs spanning a large range in luminosity (M(B)<-15). While the NUV to optical or near-IR color magnitude relations (CMR) are similar to those observed at optical wavelengths, with a monotonic reddening of the color index with increasing luminosity, the (FUV-V) and (FUV-H) CMRs show a discontinuity between massive and dwarf objects. An even more pronounced dichotomy is observed in the (FUV-NUV) CMR. For ellipticals the (FUV-NUV) color becomes bluer with increasing luminosity and with increasing reddening of the optical or near-IR color indices. For the dwarfs the opposite trend is observed. These observational evidences are consistent with the idea that the UV emission is dominated by hot, evolved stars in giant systems, while in dwarf ellipticals residual star formation activity is more common.
  • The ELAIS S1 field was observed by GALEX in both its Wide Spectroscopic and Deep Imaging Survey modes. This field was previously observed by the Infrared Space Observatory and we made use of the catalogue of multi-wavelength data published by the ELAIS consortium to select galaxies common to the two samples. Among the 959 objects with GALEX spectroscopy, 88 are present in the ELAIS catalog and 19 are galaxies with an optical spectroscopic redshift. The distribution of redshifts covers the range $0<z<1.6$. The selected galaxies have bolometric IR luminosities $10<Log(L_{IR})<13$ (deduced from the $15 \mu m$ flux using ISOCAM) which means that we cover a wide range of galaxies from normal to Ultra Luminous IR Galaxies. The mean ($\sigma$) UV luminosity (not corrected for extinction) amounts to $Log(\lambda.L_{1530}) = 9.8 (0.6)$ $L_\sun$ for the low-z ($z \le 0.35$) sample. The UV slope $\beta$ (assuming $f_\lambda \propto \lambda^\beta$) correlates with the GALEX FUV-NUV color if the sample is restricted to galaxies below $z < 0.1$. Taking advantage of the UV and IR data, we estimate the dust attenuation from the IR/UV ratio and compare it to the UV slope $\beta$. We find that it is not possible to uniquely estimate the dust attenuation from $\beta$ for our sample of galaxies. These galaxies are highly extinguished with a median value $A_{FUV} = 2.7 \pm 0.8$. Once the dust correction applied, the UV- and IR-based SFRs correlate. For the closest galaxy with the best quality spectrum, we see a feature consistent with being produced by a bump near 220nm in the attenuation curve.
  • We present GALEX NUV (2310 A) and FUV (1530 A) images of the interacting galaxy NGC 4438 (Arp 120) in the center of the Virgo cluster. These images show an extended (20 kpc) tidal tail at the north-west edge of the galaxy previously undetected at other wavelengths, at 15-25 kpc from its nucleus. Except in the nucleus, the UV morphology of NGC 4438 is totally different from the Halpha+[NII] one, more similar to the X-ray emission, confirming its gas cooling origin. We study the star formation history of NGC 4438 combining spectro-photometric data in the UV-visible-near-IR wavelength range with population synthesis and galaxy evolution models. The data are consistent with a recent (~ 10 Myr), instantaneous burst of star formation in the newly discovered UV north-western tail which is significantly younger than the age of the tidal interaction with NGC 4435, dated by dynamical models at ~ 100 Myr ago. Recent star formation events are also present at the edge of the northern arm and in the southern tail, while totally lacking in the other regions, which are dominated by the old stellar population perturbed during the dynamical interaction with NGC 4435. The contribution of this recent starburst to the total galaxy stellar mass is lower than 0.1%, an extremely low value for such a violent interaction. High-velocity, off-center tidal encounters such as that observed in Arp 120 are thus not sufficient to significantly increase the star formation activity of cluster galaxies.
  • We present the GALEX NUV (2310 A) and FUV (1530 A) galaxy luminosity functions of the nearby cluster of galaxies A1367 in the magnitude range -20.3< M_AB < -13.3. The luminosity functions are consistent with previous (~ 2 mag shallower) estimates based on the FOCA and FAUST experiments, but display a steeper faint-end slope than the GALEX luminosity function for local field galaxies. Using spectro-photometric optical data we select out star-forming systems from quiescent galaxies and study their separate contributions to the cluster luminosity function. We find that the UV luminosity function of cluster star-forming galaxies is consistent with the field. The difference between the cluster and field LF is entirely due to the contribution at low luminosities (M_AB >-16 mag) of non star-forming, early-type galaxies that are significantly over dense in clusters.
  • We use the GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer) Medium Imaging Survey (MIS) and All-Sky Imaging Survey (AIS) data available in the first internal release, matched to the SDSS catalogs in the overlapping regions, to classify objects by comparing the multi-band photometry to model colors. We show an example of the advantage of such broad wavelength coverage (GALEX far-UV and near-UV, SDSS ugriz) in classifying objects and augmenting the existing samples and catalogs. From the MIS [AIS] sample over an area of 75 [92] square degrees, we select a total of 1736 [222] QSO candidates at redshift less than 2, significantly extending the number of fainter candidates, and moderately increasing the number of bright objects in the SDSS list of spectroscopically confirmed QSO. Numerous hot stellar objects are also revealed by the UV colors, as expected.
  • We use the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) images of M83 obtained by GALEX to compute the radial profile of the UV spectral slope in the star forming disk. We briefly present a model of its chemical evolution which allows us to obtain realistic intrinsic properties of the stellar populations. Using corollary data, we also compute the profiles of H-alpha/H-beta and of the total IR (TIR) to FUV ratio. Both data and model are used to estimate and compare the extinction gradients at the FUV wavelength obtained from these various indicators. We discuss the implications for the determination of the star formation rate.
  • New GALEX observations have detected significant FUV (1530 Angstroms) and NUV (2310 Angstroms) emission from stellar substructures within the tidal tails of four ongoing galaxy mergers. The UV-bright regions are optically faint and are coincident with HI density enhancements. FUV emission is detected at any location where the HI surface density exceeds ~2 M_sun pc^{-2}, and is often detected in the absence of visible wavelength emission. UV luminosities of the brighter regions of the tidal tails imply masses of 10^6 M_sun to ~10^9 M_sun in young stars in the tails, and HI luminosities imply similar HI masses. UV-optical colors of the tidal tails indicate stellar populations as young as a few Myr, and in all cases ages < 400Myr. Most of the young stars in the tails formed in single bursts rather than resulting from continuous star formation, and they formed *in situ* as the tails evolved. Star formation appears to be older near the parent galaxies and younger at increasing distances from the parent galaxy. This could be because the star formation occurs progressively along the tails, or because the star formation has been inhibited near the galaxy/tail interface. The youngest stellar concentrations, usually near the ends of long tidal tails, have masses comparable to confirmed tidal dwarf galaxies and may be newly forming galaxies undergoing their first burst of star formation.
  • In order to investigate the origin of the far-UV (FUV) flux from the early-type galaxies, Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) is collecting the UV data for the elliptical-rich clusters at moderate redshifts (z < 0.2) where the dominant FUV source is predicted to be hot horizontal-branch (HB) stars and their post-HB progeny. Here we present our first result for the early-type galaxies in Abell 2670 at z = 0.076. Compared to NGC 1399, a nearby giant elliptical galaxy in the Fornax cluster, it appears that the rest-frame FUV - V color of the giant ellipticals gets redder by ~ 0.7 mag at the distance of Abell 2670 (z = 0.076; look-back time ~ 1.0 Gyr). Although a detailed comparison with the models is postponed until more cluster data are accumulated, it is interesting to note that this value is consistent with the variation predicted by the population synthesis models where the mean temperature of HB stars declines rapidly with increasing look-back time.
  • We present ultraviolet photometry for globular clusters (GCs) in M31 from 15 square deg of imaging using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We detect 200 and 94 GCs with certainty in the near-ultraviolet (NUV; 1750 - 2750 Angstroms) and far-ultraviolet (FUV; 1350 - 1750 Angstroms) bandpasses, respectively. Our rate of detection is about 50% in the NUV and 23% in the FUV, to an approximate limiting V magnitude of 19. Out of six clusters with [Fe/H]>-1 seen in the NUV, none is detected in the FUV bandpass. Furthermore, we find no candidate metal-rich clusters with significant FUV flux, because of the contribution of blue horizontal-branch (HB) stars, such as NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, which are metal-rich Galactic GCs with hot HB stars. We show that our GALEX photometry follows the general color trends established in previous UV studies of GCs in M31 and the Galaxy. Comparing our data with Galactic GCs in the UV and with population synthesis models, we suggest that the age range of M31 and Galactic halo GCs are similar.
  • The total ultraviolet (UV) flux (from 1412 to 2718 AA) of M 101 is compared on a pixel-to-pixel basis with the total far-infrared (FIR) flux (from 60 to 170 micron), using the maps of the galaxy taken by GALEX in the near-UV and far-UV and by ISOPHOT at 60, 100 and 170 micron. The main result of this investigation is the discovery of a tight dependence of the FIR/UV ratio on radius, with values monotonically decreasing from around 4 in the nuclear region to nearly zero towards the edge of the optical disk. Although the tightness of this dependence is in part attributable to resolution effects, the result is consistent with the presence of a large-scale distribution of diffuse dust having a face-on optical depth which decreases with radius and which dominates over the more localized variations in opacity between the arm and interarm regions. We also find a trend for the FIR/UV ratio to take on higher values in the regions of diffuse interarm emission than in the spiral-arm regions, at a given radius. This is interpreted quantitatively in terms of the escape probability of UV photons from spiral arms and their subsequent scattering in the interarm regions, and in terms of the larger relative contribution of optical photons to the heating of the dust in the interarm regions.
  • We compare the dust attenuation properties of two samples of galaxies purely selected in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band (1750-2750 A, lambda_m = 2310 A) and in the far-infrared (FIR) at 60micron. These samples are built using the GALEX and IRAS sky surveys over ~600 square degrees. The NUV selected sample contains 95 galaxies detected down to NUV=16mag (AB system). 83 galaxies in this sample are spirals or irregulars and only two of them are not detected at 60micron. The FIR selected sample is built from the IRAS PSCz catalog complete down to 0.6Jy. Among the 163 sources, we select 118 star forming galaxies well measured by IRAS, all but 1 are detected in NUV and 14 galaxies are not detected in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) band (1350-1750 A, lambda_m = 1530 A). The dust to ultraviolet (NUV and FUV) flux ratio is calibrated to estimate the dust attenuation at both wavelengths. The median value of the attenuation in NUV is found to be ~1 mag for the NUV selected sample versus ~2 mag for the FIR selected one. Within both samples, the dust attenuation is found to correlate with the luminosity of the galaxies. Almost all the NUV selected galaxies and 2/3 of the FIR selected sample exhibit a lower dust attenuation than that expected from the tight relation found previously for starburst galaxies between the dust attenuation and the slope of the ultraviolet continuum. The situation is inverse for one third of the FIR selected galaxies: their extinction is higher than that deduced from their FUV-NUV color and the relation valid for starbursts.
  • We derive a variety of physical parameters including star formation rates (SFRs), dust attenuation and burst mass fractions for 6472 galaxies observed by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) and present in the SDSS DR1 main spectroscopic sample. Parameters are estimated in a statistical way by comparing each observed broad-band SED (two GALEX and five SDSS bands) with an extensive library of model galaxy SEDs, which cover a wide range of star formation histories and include stochastic starbursts. We compare the constraints derived using SDSS bands only with those derived using the combination of SDSS and GALEX photometry. We find that the addition of the GALEX bands leads to significant improvement in the estimation of both the dust optical depth and the star formation rate over timescales of 100 Myr to 1 Gyr in a galaxy. We are sensitive to SFRs as low as 10^{-3} M_sun/yr, and we find that low levels of star formation (SF) are mostly associated with early-type, red galaxies. The least massive galaxies have ratios of current to past-averaged SF rates (b-parameter) consistent with constant SF over a Hubble time. For late-type galaxies, this ratio on average decreases with mass. We find that b correlates tightly with NUV-r color, implying that the SF history of a galaxy can be constrained on the basis of the NUV-r color alone. The fraction of galaxies that have undergone a significant starburst episode within the last 1 Gyr steeply declines with mass-from ~20% for galaxies with ~10^8 M_sun to ~5% for ~10^11 M_sun galaxies.
  • We present ultraviolet photometry for a sample of morphologically early-type galaxies selected by matching the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 1 with the GALEX Medium and All-sky Imaging Surveys. We obtain a working sample of 1032 early-type galaxies with GALEX FUV detections, SDSS spectroscopy, and $z<0.2$. Using the SDSS spectra to identify galaxies with even weak star formation or evidence of AGN, and further removing galaxies with any evidence of non early-type morphology, we derive a final sample of 172 red quiescent early-type galaxies. We find that the $FUV-r$ color has a full range of 5 mag. Plotting against the $FUV-r$ color the metallicity sensitive Lick $\rm Mg_2$ and D4000 indices, and the stellar velocity dispersion, we find no correlation between our measurement of UV rising flux, and any parameter sensitive to metallicity.
  • M32, the compact elliptical-galaxy companion to the Andromeda spiral galaxy has been imaged by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) in two ultraviolet bands, centered at ~1500 (FUV) and 2300 Angstroms (NUV). The imaging data have been carefully decomposed so as to properly account for the complicated background contamination from the disk of M31. We have derived the surface brightness and color profiles finding a slightly positive color gradient of Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)=+0.15+/-0.03 within one effective radius. Earlier data from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope suggested that M32 had an extremely large (negative) FUV-optical color gradient (Delta(FUV-B)/Delta log(r)<-2), inverted with respect to the majority of gradients seen in giant elliptical galaxies. Our new results show that, despite of its very low UV-upturn, M32 has similar UV properties to those observed in luminous elliptical galaxies.
  • We present measurements of the UV galaxy luminosity function and the evolution of luminosity density from GALEX observations matched to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We analyze galaxies in the Medium Imaging Survey overlapping the SDSS DR1 with a total coverage of 44 deg^2. Using the combined GALEX+SDSS photometry, we compute photometric redshifts and study the LF in three redshift shells between z=0.07 and 0.25. The Schechter function fits indicate that the faint-end slope alpha is consistent with -1.1 at all redshifts but the characteristic UV luminosity M* brightens by 0.2 mag from z=0.07 to 0.25. In the lowest redshift bin, early and late type galaxies are studied separately and we confirm that red galaxies tend to be brighter and have a shallower slope alpha than blue ones. The derived luminosity densities are consistent with other GALEX results based on a local spectroscopic sample from 2dF and the evolution follows the trend reported by deeper studies.
  • Ultraviolet imaging with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has revealed an extensive sample of UV-bright stellar complexes in the extreme outer disk of M83, extending to about four times the radius where the majority of HII regions are detected (R_HII = 5.1' or 6.6 kpc). These sources are typically associated with large-scale filamentary HI structures in the warped outer disk of M83, and are distributed beyond the galactocentric radii at which molecular ISM has yet been detected. We present measured properties of these stellar complexes, including FUV and NUV magnitudes and local gas surface density. Only a subset of the outer disk UV sources have corresponding HII regions detected in H-alpha imaging, consistent with a sample of mixed age in which some sources are a few Myr old and others are much more evolved (~ 10^8 yr).