• Every quasar spectrum contains absorption-line signatures from the interstellar medium, disk-halo interface, and circumgalactic medium (CGM) of the Milky Way (MW). We analyze HST/COS spectra of 132 quasars to study the significance and origin of the SiIV absorption at $|v_{\rm LSR}|\leq100$ km s$^{-1}$. Within this velocity range, SiIV has an average column density of log$\bar{N}=13.50\pm0.17$ and its all-sky distribution does not significantly correlate with the Galactic latitude or longitude. The gas in the north predominantly infalls at $v\gtrsim-50$ km s$^{-1}$ while in the south no such pattern is observed. We find that the SiIV distribution cannot be explained by the commonly adopted disk-halo model of a flat slab co-rotating with the disk. We propose a two-component model to reconstruct the distribution with a global background and a plane-parallel disk-halo component. With block bootstrapping, we find $13.41\lesssim$ log$N_{\rm global}\lesssim13.59$ and log$N_{\rm DH, \perp}\lesssim12.89$ for the global and disk-halo components at $1\sigma$, respectively. The global component is most likely to have a Galactic origin, although its exact location is uncertain. If it were associated with the MW's extended CGM, our order-of-magnitude mass estimate finds a total mass of $\sim(3.7-5.6)\times10^{10} M_{\odot}(\frac{R}{160\ {\rm kpc}})^2$ for gas at warm ionized phases, consistent with CGM studies of $\sim L^*$ galaxies at low redshifts. Our analyses show that there is likely to be a large amount of gas at $|v_{\rm LSR}|\leq100$ km s$^{-1}$ hidden in the MW's CGM. Along with this work, we make our continuum-normalized spectra publicly available as the COS Quasar Database for Galactic Absorption Lines (COS-GAL).
  • We present calibrations for star formation rate indicators in the ultraviolet, mid-infrared and radio continuum bands, including one of the first direct calibrations of 150 MHz as a star formation rate indicator. Our calibrations utilize 66 nearby star forming galaxies with Balmer decrement corrected H-alpha luminosities, which span 5 orders of magnitude in star formation rate and have absolute magnitudes of -24<M_r<-12. Most of our photometry and spectrophotometry is measured from the same region of each galaxy, and our spectrophotometry has been validated with SDSS photometry, so our random and systematic errors are small relative to the intrinsic scatter seen in star formation rate indicator calibrations. We find WISE W4 (22.8 micron), Spitzer 24 micron and 1.4 GHz have tight correlations with Balmer decrement corrected H-alpha luminosity, with scatter of only 0.2 dex. Our calibrations are comparable to those from the prior literature for L* galaxies, but for dwarf galaxies our calibrations can give star formation rates that are far greater than those derived from much of the prior literature.
  • We report the detection of a largely ionized very-high velocity cloud (VHVC; $v_{\rm LSR}\sim-350$ km/s) toward M33 with the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origin Spectrograph. The VHVC is detected in OI, CII, SiII, and SiIII absorption along five sightlines separated by ~0.06-0.4 degree. On sub-degree scales, the velocities and ionic column densities of the VHVC remain relatively smooth with standard deviations of +/-14 km/s and +/-0.15 dex between the sightlines, respectively. The VHVC has a metallicity of [OI/HI]=-0.56+/-0.17 dex (Z=0.28+/-0.11 Z$_{\odot}$). Despite the position-velocity proximity of the VHVC to the ionized Magellanic Stream, the VHVC's higher metallicity makes it unlikely to be associated with the Stream, highlighting the complex velocity structure of this region of sky. We investigate the VHVC's possible origin by revisiting its surrounding HI environment. We find that the VHVC may be: (1) a MW CGM cloud, (2) related to a nearby HI VHVC -- Wright's Cloud, or (3) connected to M33's northern warp. Furthermore, the VHVC could be a bridge connecting Wright's Cloud and M33's northern warp, which would make it a Magellanic-like structure in the halo of M33.
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy from APOGEE and wide-field optical photometry from Pan-STARRS1 have recently made possible precise measurements of the shape of the extinction curve for tens of thousands of stars, parameterized by R(V). These measurements revealed structures in R(V) with large angular scales, which are challenging to explain in existing dust paradigms. In this work, we combine three-dimensional maps of dust column density with R(V) measurements to constrain the three-dimensional distribution of R(V) in the Milky Way. We find that variations in R(V) are correlated on kiloparsec scales. In particular, most of the dust within one kiloparsec in the outer Galaxy, including many local molecular clouds (Orion, Taurus, Perseus, California, Cepheus), has a significantly lower R(V) than more distant dust in the Milky Way. These results provide new input to models of dust evolution and processing, and complicate application of locally derived extinction curves to more distant regions of the Milky Way and to other galaxies.
  • Neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are "supershells". These gigantic structures requiring $\gtrsim 3 \times 10^{52}$ erg to form are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or alternatively by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling to the Galactic disk. Here we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040+01$-$282 (hereafter CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the "Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array" HI 21-cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk $\sim 5$ Myrs ago to form the supershell. Our result shows that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.
  • We present medium-resolution, near-ultraviolet VLT/FLAMES observations of the star USNO-A0600-15865535. We adapt a standard method of stellar typing to our measurement of the shape of the Balmer epsilon absorption line to demonstrates that USNO-A0600-15865535 is a blue horizontal branch star, residing in the lower stellar halo at a distance of 4.4 kpc from the Sun. We measure the H & K lines of singly-ionized calcium and find two isolated velocity components, one originating in the disk, and one associated with high-velocity cloud complex WD. This detection demonstrated that complex WD is closer than ~4.4 kpc and is the first distance constraint on the +100 km/s Galactic complex of clouds. We find that Complex WD is not in corotation with the Galactic disk as has been assumed for decades. We examine a number of scenarios, and find that the most likely is that Complex WD was ejected from the solar neighborhood and is only a few kpc from the Sun.
  • The dust extinction curve is a critical component of many observational programs and an important diagnostic of the physics of the interstellar medium. Here we present new measurements of the dust extinction curve and its variation towards tens of thousands of stars, a hundred-fold larger sample than in existing detailed studies. We use data from the APOGEE spectroscopic survey in combination with ten-band photometry from Pan-STARRS1, 2MASS, and WISE. We find that the extinction curve in the optical through infrared is well characterized by a one-parameter family of curves described by R(V). The extinction curve is more uniform than suggested in past works, with sigma(R(V)) = 0.18, and with less than one percent of sight lines having R(V) > 4. Our data and analysis have revealed two new aspects of Galactic extinction: first, we find significant, wide-area variations in R(V) throughout the Galactic plane. These variations are on scales much larger than individual molecular clouds, indicating that R(V) variations must trace much more than just grain growth in dense molecular environments. Indeed, we find no correlation between R(V) and dust column density up to E(B-V) ~ 2. Second, we discover a strong relationship between R(V) and the far-infrared dust emissivity.
  • We present a catalog of 1964 isolated, compact neutral hydrogen clouds from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Survey Data Release One (GALFA-HI DR1). The clouds were identified by a custom machine-vision algorithm utilizing Difference of Gaussian kernels to search for clouds smaller than 20'. The clouds have velocities typically between |VLSR| = 20-400 km/s, linewidths of 2.5-35 km/s, and column densities ranging from 1 - 35 x 10^18 cm^-2. The distances to the clouds in this catalog may cover several orders of magnitude, so the masses may range from less than a Solar mass for clouds within the Galactic disc, to greater than 10^4 Solar Masses for HVCs at the tip of the Magellanic Stream. To search for trends, we separate the catalog into five populations based on position, velocity, and linewidth: high velocity clouds (HVCs); galaxy candidates; cold low velocity clouds (LVCs); warm, low positive-velocity clouds in the third Galactic Quadrant; and the remaining warm LVCs. The observed HVCs are found to be associated with previously-identified HVC complexes. We do not observe a large population of isolated clouds at high velocities as some models predict. We see evidence for distinct histories at low velocities in detecting populations of clouds corotating with the Galactic disc and a set of clouds that is not corotating.
  • We assess the fraction of the Milky Way's circumgalactic medium (CGM) eluding detection due to its velocity being similar to gas in the disk. This is achieved using synthetic observations of the CGM in a simulated MW-mass galaxy that shows similar CGM kinematics to the MW and external L$\sim$L$_*$ galaxies. As viewed by a mock observer at a location similar to the Sun, only 50$\%$ (by mass) of the gas moves at high velocity ($|v_{\rm LSR}|\geq$100 km s$^{-1}$ or $|v_{\rm DEV}|\geq$50 km s$^{-1}$) in the simulated CGM and would be observable. The low velocity gas is thermodynamically similar to the high velocity gas, indicating the 50$\%$ observable fraction is applicable to spectral lines from the radio to the ultraviolet. We apply the observable mass fraction (50$\%$) to current estimates of the MW's CGM, and find a corrected total mass of 2.8$\times$10$^{8} M_{\odot}$ for gas below 10$^6$K within $\sim15$ kpc (this excludes the Magellanic System). This is less than the total mass of the CGM extending out to $\sim$150 kpc in other L$\sim$L$_*$ galaxies. However, we find similar OVI column densities when the discrepancy in path length between the MW and external galaxies is considered. The coherent spatial and kinematic distribution of low velocity gas in the simulated CGM suggests that current HI observations of the MW's CGM may miss large low velocity HI complexes. In addition, current mass estimates of the MW's CGM based on high-velocity line observations with distance constraints may miss a non-negligible fraction of gas in the outer halo which can be obscured if it moves at a velocity similar to the gas in the lower halo.
  • Using spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey we present a detection of reddening due to dust in the circumgalactic medium of galaxies. We detect the mean change in the colors of "standard crayons" correlated with the presence of foreground galaxies at z ~0.05 as a function of angular separation. Following Peek & Graves (2010), we create standard crayons using passively evolving galaxies corrected for Milky Way reddening and color-redshift trends, leading to a sample with as little as 2% scatter in color. We devise methods to ameliorate possible systematic effects related to the estimation of colors, and we find an excess reddening induced by foreground galaxies at a level ranging from 10 to 0.5 millimagnitudes on scales ranging from 30 kpc to 1 Mpc. We attribute this effect to a large-scale distribution of dust around galaxies similar to the findings of Menard et al. 2010. We find that circumgalactic reddening is a weak function of stellar mass over the range $6 \times 10^9 M_\odot$ -- $6 \times 10^{10} M_\odot$ and note that this behavior appears to be consistent with recent results on the distribution of metals in the gas phase.
  • We have searched for infrared dust emission from subsets of compact, Galactic neutral hydrogen clouds, with the purpose of looking for dust in high-velocity clouds, identifying low-velocity halo clouds, and investigating the cloud populations defined in the GALFA-HI Compact Cloud Catalog. We do not detect dust emission from high-velocity clouds. The lack of dust emission from a group of low-velocity clouds supports the claim that they are low-velocity halo clouds. We detect dust in the remaining low-velocity clouds, indicating a Galactic origin, with a significantly greater dust-to-gas ratio for clouds with linewidths near 15 km/s. We propose that this is due to dust associated with ionized gas.
  • We present an atlas of 129 spectral energy distributions for nearby galaxies, with wavelength coverage spanning from the UV to the mid-infrared. Our atlas spans a broad range of galaxy types, including ellipticals, spirals, merging galaxies, blue compact dwarfs and luminous infrared galaxies. We have combined ground-based optical drift-scan spectrophotometry with infrared spectroscopy from Spitzer and Akari, with gaps in spectral coverage being filled using MAGPHYS spectral energy distribution models. The spectroscopy and models were normalized, constrained and verified with matched-aperture photometry measured from Swift, GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, Spitzer and WISE images. The availability of 26 photometric bands allowed us to identify and mitigate systematic errors present in the data. Comparison of our spectral energy distributions with other template libraries and the observed colors of galaxies indicates that we have smaller systematic errors than existing atlases, while spanning a broader range of galaxy types. Relative to the prior literature, our atlas will provide improved K-corrections, photometric redshifts and star-formation rate calibrations.
  • In order to study the properties and effects of high Galactic latitude dust we present an analysis of 373,303 galaxies selected from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) All-Sky Survey and Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Data Release. By examining the variation in aggregate ultraviolet colors and number density of these galaxies we measure the extinction curve at high latitude. We additionally consider a population of spectroscopically selected galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to measure extinction in the optical. We find that dust at high latitude is neither quantitatively nor qualitatively consistent with standard reddening laws. Extinction in the FUV and NUV is ~10% and ~35% higher than expected, with significant variation across the sky. We find that no single R_V parameter fits both the optical and ultraviolet extinction at high latitude, and that while both show detectable variation across the sky, these variations are not related. We propose that the overall trends we detect likely stem from an increase in very small silicate grains in the ISM.
  • Both the Galactic 21-cm line flux from neutral hydrogen (HI) in interstellar medium and the far-infrared (FIR) emission from Galactic dust grains have been used to estimate the strength of Galactic reddening of distant sources. In this work we use a collection of uniform color distant galaxies as color standards to determine whether the HI method or the FIR method is superior. We find that the two methods both produce reasonably accurate maps, but that both show significant errors as compared to the typical color of the background galaxies. We find that a mixture of the FIR and HI maps in roughly a 2-to-1 ratio is clearly superior to either map alone. We recommend that future reddening maps should use both sets of data, and that well-constructed FIR and HI maps should both be vigorously pursued.
  • Galactic halo gas traces inflowing star formation fuel and feedback from a galaxy's disk and is therefore crucial to our understanding of galaxy evolution. In this review, we summarize the multi-wavelength observational properties and origin models of Galactic and low redshift spiral galaxy halo gas. Galactic halos contain multiphase gas flows that are dominated in mass by the ionized component and extend to large radii. The densest, coldest halo gas observed in neutral hydrogen (HI) is generally closest to the disk (< 20 kpc), and absorption line results indicate warm and warm-hot diffuse halo gas is present throughout a galaxy's halo. The hot halo gas detected is not a significant fraction of a galaxy's baryons. The disk-halo interface is where the multiphase flows are integrated into the star forming disk, and there is evidence for both feedback and fueling at this interface from the temperature and kinematic gradient of the gas and HI structures. The origin and fate of halo gas is considered in the context of cosmological and idealized local simulations. Accretion along cosmic filaments occurs in both a hot (> 10^5.5 K) and cold mode in simulations, with the compressed material close to the disk the coldest and densest, in agreement with observations. There is evidence in halo gas observations for radiative and mechanical feedback mechanisms, including escaping photons from the disk, supernova-driven winds, and a galactic fountain. Satellite accretion also leaves behind abundant halo gas. This satellite gas interacts with the existing halo medium, and much of this gas will become part of the diffuse halo before it can reach the disk. The accretion rate from cold and warm halo gas is generally below a galaxy disk's star formation rate, but gas at the disk-halo interface and stellar feedback may be important additional fuel sources.
  • We perform high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of a Milky Way-mass galaxy in a fully cosmological setting using the adaptive mesh refinement code, Enzo, and study the kinematics of gas in the simulated galactic halo. We find that the gas inflow occurs mostly along filamentary structures in the halo. The warm-hot (10^5 K < T < 10^6 K) and hot (T > 10^6 K) ionized gases are found to dominate the overall mass accretion in the system (with dM/dt = 3-5 M_solar/yr) over a large range of distances, extending from the virial radius to the vicinity of the disk. Most of the inflowing gas (by mass) does not cool, and the small fraction that manages to cool does so primarily close to the galaxy (R <~ 20 kpc), perhaps comprising the neutral gas that may be detectable as, e.g., high-velocity clouds. The neutral clouds are embedded within larger, accreting filamentary flows, and represent only a small fraction of the total mass inflow rate. The inflowing gas has relatively low metallicity (Z/Z_solar < 0.2). The outer layers of the filamentary inflows are heated due to compression as they approach the disk. In addition to the inflow, we find high-velocity, metal-enriched outflows of hot gas driven by supernova feedback. Our results are consistent with observations of halo gas at low z.
  • To investigate the fundamental principles of H2 formation in a giant molecular cloud (GMC), we derive the HI and H2 surface density (Sigma_HI and Sigma_H2) images of the Perseus molecular cloud on sub-pc scales (~0.4 pc). We use the far-infrared data from the Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey and the V-band extinction image provided by the COMPLETE Survey to estimate the dust column density image of Perseus. In combination with the HI data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI Survey and an estimate of the local dust-to-gas ratio, we then derive the Sigma_H2 distribution across Perseus. We find a relatively uniform Sigma_HI ~ 6-8 Msun pc^-2 for both dark and star-forming regions, suggesting a minimum HI surface density required to shield H2 against photodissociation. As a result, a remarkably tight and consistent relation is found between Sigma_H2/Sigma_HI and Sigma_HI+Sigma_H2. The transition between the HI- and H2-dominated regions occurs at N(HI)+2N(H2) ~ (8-14) x 10^20 cm^-2. Our findings are consistent with predictions for H2 formation in equilibrium, suggesting that turbulence may not be of primary importance for H2 formation. However, the importance of a warm neutral medium for H2 shielding, an internal radiation field, and the timescale of H2 formation still remain as open questions. We also compare H2 and CO distributions and estimate the fraction of "CO-dark" gas, f_DG ~ 0.3. While significant spatial variations of f_DG are found, we do not find a clear correlation with the mean V-band extinction.
  • Using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained high-resolution ultraviolet spectra of the C I absorption toward two stars behind the Local Leo Cold Cloud (LLCC). At a distance (~20 pc) that places it well inside the Local Bubble, the LLCC is the nearest example of the coldest known (T~20 K) diffuse interstellar clouds. The STIS measurements of the C I fine-structure excitation toward HD 85259 and HD 83023 indicate that the thermal gas pressure of the LLCC is much greater than that of the warm clouds in the Local Bubble. The mean LLCC pressure measured toward these two stars (60,000 cm$^{-3}$ K) implies an H I density of ~3000 cm$^{-3}$ and a cloud thickness of ~200 AU at the 20 K cloud temperature. Such a thin, cold, dense structure could arise at the collision interface between converging flows of warm gas. However, the measured LLCC pressure is appreciably higher than that expected in the colliding cloud interpretation given the velocity and column density constraints on warm clouds in the HD 85259 and HD 83023 sightlines. Additional STIS measurements of the Zn II, Ni II, and Cr II column densities toward HD 85259 indicate that the LLCC has a modest "warm cloud" dust depletion pattern consistent with its low dust-to-gas ratio determined from H I 21 cm and 100 micron observations. In support of the inferred sheet-like geometry for the LLCC, a multi-epoch comparison of the Na I absorption toward a high-proper-motion background star reveals a 40% column density variation indicative of LLCC Na I structure on a scale of ~50 AU.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of the local Leo cold cloud (LLCC), a very nearby, very cold cloud in the interstellar medium. Through stellar absorption studies we find that the LLCC is between 11.3 pc and 24.3 pc away, making it the closest known cold neutral medium cloud and well within the boundaries of the local cavity. Observations of the cloud in the 21-cm HI line reveal that the LLCC is very cold, with temperatures ranging from 15 K to 30 K, and is best fit with a model composed of two colliding components. The cloud has associated 100 micron thermal dust emission, pointing to a somewhat low dust-to-gas ratio of 48 x 10^-22 MJy sr^-1 cm^2. We find that the LLCC is too far away to be generated by the collision among the nearby complex of local interstellar clouds, but that the small relative velocities indicate that the LLCC is somehow related to these clouds. We use the LLCC to conduct a shadowing experiment in 1/4 keV X-rays, allowing us to differentiate between different possible origins for the observed soft X-ray background. We find that a local hot bubble model alone cannot account for the low-latitude soft X-ray background, but that isotropic emission from solar wind charge exchange does reproduce our data. In a combined local hot bubble and solar wind charge exchange scenario, we rule out emission from a local hot bubble with an 1/4 keV emissivity greater than 1.1 Snowdens / pc at 3 sigma, 4 times lower than previous estimates. This result dramatically changes our perspective on our local interstellar medium.
  • We present the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) survey, and its first full data release (DR1). GALFA-HI is a high resolution (~ 4'), large area (13000 deg^2), high spectral resolution (0.18 km/s), wide band (-700 < v_LSR < +700 km/s) survey of the Galactic interstellar medium in the 21-cm line hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen conducted at Arecibo Observatory. Typical noise levels are 80 mK RMS in an integrated 1 km/s channel. GALFA-HI is a dramatic step forward in high-resolution, large-area Galactic HI surveys, and we compare GALFA-HI to past, present, and future Galactic HI surveys. We describe in detail new techniques we have developed to reduce these data in the presence of fixed pattern noise, gain variation, and inconsistent beam shapes, and we show how we have largely mitigated these effects. We present our first full data release, covering 7520 square degrees of sky and representing 3046 hours of integration time, and discuss the details of these data.
  • Observations from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI) Survey of the tail of Complex C are presented and the halo clouds associated with this complex cataloged. The properties of the Complex C clouds are compared to clouds cataloged at the tail of the Magellanic Stream to provide insight into the origin and destruction mechanism of Complex C. Magellanic Stream and Complex C clouds show similarities in their mass distributions (slope = -0.7 and -0.6, respectively) and have a common linewidth of 20 - 30 km/s (indicative of a warm component), which may indicate a common origin and/or physical process breaking down the clouds. The clouds cataloged at the tail of Complex C extend over a mass range of 10^1.1 to 10^4.8 solar masses, sizes of 10^1.2 to 10^2.6 pc, and have a median volume density of 0.065 cm^(-3) and median pressure of (P/k) = 580 K cm^{-3}. We do not see a prominent two-phase structure in Complex C, possibly due to its low metallicity and inefficient cooling compared to other halo clouds. From assuming the Complex C clouds are in pressure equilibrium with a hot halo medium, we find a median halo density of 5.8 x 10^(-4) cm^(-3), which given a constant distance of 10 kpc, is at a z-height of ~3 kpc. Using the same argument for the Stream results in a median halo density of 8.4 x 10^(-5) x (60kpc/d) cm^(-3). These densities are consistent with previous observational constraints and cosmological simulations. We also assess the derived cloud and halo properties with three dimensional grid simulations of halo HI clouds and find the temperature is generally consistent within a factor of 1.5 and the volume densities, pressures and halo densities are consistent within a factor of 3.
  • We present corrections to the Schlegel, Finkbeiner, Davis (SFD98) reddening maps over the Sloan Digital Sky Survey northern Galactic cap area. To find these corrections, we employ what we dub the "standard crayon" method, in which we use passively evolving galaxies as color standards by which to measure deviations from the reddening map. We select these passively evolving galaxies spectroscopically, using limits on the H alpha and O II equivalent widths to remove all star-forming galaxies from the SDSS main galaxy catalog. We find that by correcting for known reddening, redshift, color-magnitude relation, and variation of color with environmental density, we can reduce the scatter in color to below 3% in the bulk of the 151,637 galaxies we select. Using these galaxies we construct maps of the deviation from the SFD98 reddening map at 4.5 degree resolution, with 1-sigma error of ~ 1.5 millimagnitudes E(B-V). We find that the SFD98 maps are largely accurate with most of the map having deviations below 3 millimagnitudes E(B-V), though some regions do deviate from SFD98 by as much as 50%. The maximum deviation found is 45 millimagnitudes in E(B-V), and spatial structure of the deviation is strongly correlated with the observed dust temperature, such that SFD98 underpredicts reddening in regions of low dust temperature. Our maps of these deviations, as well as their errors, are made available to the scientific community as supplemental correction to SFD98 at http://www.peekandgraves2010.com.
  • In this paper we present the results of the statistical analysis of high-latitude HI turbulence in the Milky Way. We have observed HI in the 21 cm line, obtained with the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver at the Arecibo radio telescope. For recovering of velocity statistics we have used the Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS) technique. In our analysis we have used direct fitting of the VCS model, as its asymptotic regimes are questionable for Arecibo's resolution and given the restrictions from thermal smoothing of the turbulent line. We have obtained a velocity spectral index $3.87 \pm 0.11$, an injection scale of $140 \pm 80$ pc, and an HI cold phase temperature of $52 \pm 11$ K. The spectral index is steeper than the Kolmogorov index and can be interpreted as being due to shock-dominated turbulence.
  • Ongoing star formation in the Milky Way requires continuous gaseous fuel from accretion. Previous work has suggested that the accretion of dwarf galaxies could provide the needed gas for this process. In this work we investigate whether dwarf galaxy accretion is consistent with the radial profile of star formation observed in the Milky Way, which is strongly concentrated toward the center of the gaseous disk of the Galaxy. Using realistic parameters for the Galactic potential, gaseous halo, Galactic disk, velocities of dwarf galaxies, and effects of drag on stripped gas in the halo, we model the distribution of radii at which dwarf galaxies accrete onto the Galactic disk. We also model the radial distribution of the accretion of gas that cools directly out of the halo by examining the results of recent simulations. We show that dwarf galaxies cannot reproduce the concentration of accretion toward the center of the Galaxy required by star formation. We also show that clouds that cool directly from the halo can reproduce this central concentration, and conclude that this difference is largely due to the discrepancy in absolute specific angular momentum between the two mechanisms.
  • Models that reproduce the observed high-velocity clouds (HVCs) also predict clouds at lower radial velocities that may easily be confused with Galactic disk (|z| < 1 kpc) gas. We describe the first search for these low-velocity halo clouds (LVHCs) using IRAS data and the initial data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey in HI (GALFA-HI). The technique is based upon the expectation that such clouds should, like HVCs, have very limited infrared thermal dust emission as compared to their HI column density. We describe our 'displacement-map' technique for robustly determining the dust-to-gas ratio of clouds and the associated errors that takes into account the significant scatter in the infrared flux from the Galactic disk gas. We find that there exist lower-velocity clouds that have extremely low dust-to-gas ratios, consistent with being in the Galactic halo - candidate LVHCs. We also confirm the lack of dust in many HVCs with the notable exception of complex M, which we consider to be the first detection of warm dust in HVCs. We do not confirm the previously reported detection of dust in complex C. In addition, we find that most Intermediate- and Low-Velocity clouds that are part of the Galactic disk have a higher 60 micron/100 micron flux ratio than is typically seen in Galactic HI, which is consistent with a previously proposed picture in which fast-moving Galactic clouds have smaller, hotter dust grains.