• We construct a faithful tensor representation for the Yokonuma-Hecke algebra Y, and use it to give a concrete isomorphism between Y and Shoji's modified Ariki-Koike algebra. We give a cellular basis for Y and show that the Jucys-Murphy elements for Y are JM-elements in the abstract sense. Finally, we construct a cellular basis for the Aicardi-Juyumaya algebra of braids and ties.
  • We present 39 nights of optical photometry, 34 nights of infrared photometry, and 4 nights of optical spectroscopy of the Type Ia SN 1999ac. This supernova was discovered two weeks before maximum light, and observations were begun shortly thereafter. At early times its spectra resembled the unusual SN 1999aa and were characterized by very high velocities in the Ca II H and K lines, but very low velocities in the Si II 6355 A line. The optical photometry showed a slow rise to peak brightness but, quite peculiarly, was followed by a more rapid decline from maximum. Thus, the B- and V-band light curves cannot be characterized by a single stretch factor. We argue that the best measure of the nature of this object is not the decline rate parameter Delta m_15 (B). The B-V colors were unusual from 30 to 90 days after maximum light in that they evolved to bluer values at a much slower rate than normal Type Ia supernovae. The spectra and bolometric light curve indicate that this event was similar to the spectroscopically peculiar slow decliner SN 1999aa.
  • We present optical and/or infrared photometry of the Type Ia supernovae SN 1991T, SN 1991bg, SN 1999ek, SN 2001bt, SN 2001cn, SN 2001cz, and SN 2002bo. All but one of these supernovae have decline rate parameters Delta m_15(B) close to the median value of 1.1 for the whole class of Type Ia supernovae. The addition of these supernovae to the relationship between the near-infrared absolute magnitudes and Delta m_15(B) strengthens the previous relationships we have found, in that the maximum light absolute magnitudes are essentially independent of the decline rate parameter. (SN 1991bg, the prototype of the subclass of fast declining Type Ia supernovae, is a special case.) The dispersion in the Hubble diagram in JHK is only ~0.15 mag. The near-infrared properties of Type Ia supernovae continue to be excellent measures of the luminosity distances to the supernova host galaxies, due to the need for only small corrections from the epoch of observation to maximum light, low dispersion in absolute magnitudes at maximum light, and the minimal reddening effects in the near-infrared.
  • We present optical and infrared photometry of the unusual Type Ia supernova 2000cx. With the data of Li et al. (2001) and Jha (2002), this comprises the largest dataset ever assembled for a Type Ia SN, more than 600 points in UBVRIJHK. We confirm the finding of Li et al. regarding the unusually blue B-V colors as SN 2000cx entered the nebular phase. Its I-band secondary hump was extremely weak given its B-band decline rate. The V minus near infrared colors likewise do not match loci based on other slowly declining Type Ia SNe, though V-K is the least ``abnormal''. In several ways SN 2000cx resembles other slow decliners, given its B-band decline rate (Delta m_15(B) = 0.93), the appearance of Fe III lines and weakness of Si II in its pre-maximum spectrum, the V-K colors and post-maximum V-H colors. If the distance modulus derived from Surface Brightness Fluctuations of the host galaxy is correct, we find that the rate of light increase prior to maximum, the characteristics of the bolometric light curve, and the implied absolute magnitude at maximum are all consistent with a sub-luminous object with Delta m_15(B) ~ 1.6-1.7 having a higher than normal kinetic energy.
  • We present UBVRIz lightcurves of the Type Ia SN 1999ee and the Type Ib/c SN 1999ex, both located in the galaxy IC 5179. SN 1999ee has an extremely well sampled lightcurve spanning from 10 days before Bmax through 53 days after peak. Near maximum we find systematic differences ~0.05 mag in photometry measured with two different telescopes, even though the photometry is reduced to the same local standards around the supernova using the specific color terms for each instrumental system. We use models for our bandpasses and spectrophotometry of SN 1999ee to derive magnitude corrections (S-corrections) and remedy this problem. This exercise demonstrates the need of accurately characterizing the instrumental system before great photometric accuracies of Type Ia supernovae can be claimed. It also shows that this effect can have important astrophysical consequences since a small systematic shift of 0.02 mag in the B-V color can introduce a 0.08 mag error in the extinction corrected peak B magnitudes of a supernova and thus lead to biased cosmological parameters. The data for the Type Ib/c SN 1999ex present us with the first ever observed shock breakout of a supernova of this class. These observations show that shock breakout occurred 18 days before Bmax and support the idea that Type Ib/c supernovae are due to core collapse of massive stars rather than thermonuclear disruption of white dwarfs.