• We studied the molecular gas properties of AzTEC/C159, a star-forming disk galaxy at $z=4.567$. We secured $^{12}$CO molecular line detections for the $J=2\to1$ and $J=5\to4$ transitions using the Karl G. Jansky VLA and the NOEMA interferometer. The broad (FWHM$\sim750\,{\rm km\,s}^{-1}$) and tentative double-peaked profiles of both $^{12}$CO lines are consistent with an extended molecular gas reservoir, which is distributed in a rotating disk as previously revealed from [CII] 158$\mu$m line observations. Based on the $^{12}$CO(2$\to$1) emission line we derived $L'_{\rm{CO}}=(3.4\pm0.6)\times10^{10}{\rm \,K\,km\,s}^{-1}{\rm \,pc}^{2}$, that yields a molecular gas mass of $M_{\rm H_2 }(\alpha_{\rm CO}/4.3)=(1.5\pm0.3)\times 10^{11}{\rm M}_\odot$ and unveils a gas-rich system with $\mu_{\rm gas}(\alpha_{\rm CO}/4.3)\equiv M_{\rm H_2}/M_\star=3.3\pm0.7$. The extreme star formation efficiency (SFE) of AzTEC/C159, parametrized by the ratio $L_{\rm{IR}}/L'_{\rm{CO}}=(216\pm80)\, {\rm L}_{\odot}{\rm \,(K\,km\,s}^{-1}{\rm \,pc}^{2})^{-1}$, is comparable to merger-driven starbursts such as local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and SMGs. Likewise, the $^{12}$CO(5$\to$4)/CO(2$\to$1) line brightness temperature ratio of $r_{52}= 0.55\pm 0.15$ is consistent with high excitation conditions, similar to that observed in SMGs. We constrained the value for the $L'_{\text{CO}}-{\rm H}_2$ mass conversion factor in AzTEC/C159, i.e. $\alpha_{\text{CO}}=3.9^{+2.7}_{-1.3}{\rm \,M}_{\odot}{\rm \,K}^{-1}{\rm \,km}^{-1}{\rm \,s\,pc}^{-2}$, that is consistent with a self-gravitating molecular gas distribution as observed in local star-forming disk galaxies. Cold gas streams from cosmological filaments might be fueling a gravitationally unstable gas-rich disk in AzTEC/C159, which breaks into giant clumps forming stars as efficiently as in merger-driven systems and generate high gas excitation.
  • Panchromatic observations of the best candidate HyLIRG from the widest Herschel extragalactic imaging survey have led to the discovery of at least four intrinsically luminous z=2.41 galaxies across a ~100-kpc region - a cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals. Via sub-arcsecond interferometric imaging we have measured accurate gas and star-formation surface densities. The two brightest galaxies span ~3 kpc FWHM in submm/radio continuum and CO J=4-3, and double that in CO J=1-0. The broad CO line is due partly to the multitude of constituent galaxies and partly to large rotational velocities in two counter-rotating gas disks -- a scenario predicted to lead to the most intense starbursts, which will therefore come in pairs. The disks have M(dyn) of several x 10^11 Msun, and gas fractions of ~40%. Velocity dispersions are modest so the disks are unstable, potentially on scales commensurate with their radii: these galaxies are undergoing extreme bursts of star formation, not confined to their nuclei, at close to the Eddington limit. Their specific star-formation rates place them ~>5x above the main sequence, which supposedly comprises large gas disks like these. Their high star-formation efficiencies are difficult to reconcile with a simple volumetric star-formation law. N-body and dark matter simulations suggest this system is the progenitor of a B(inary)-type ~10^14.6-Msun cluster.
  • We present results of 2 mm observations of the Crab Nebula, obtained using the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2 Millimeter Observer (GISMO) bolometer camera on the IRAM 30 m telescope. Additional 3.3 mm observations with the MUSTANG bolometer array on the Green Bank Telescope are also presented. The integrated 2 mm flux density of the Crab Nebula provides no evidence for the emergence of a second synchrotron component that has been proposed. It is consistent with the radio power law spectrum, extrapolated up to a break frequency of log(nu_{b} [GHz]) = 2.84 +/- 0.29 or nu_{b} = 695^{+651}_{-336} GHz. The Crab Nebula is well-resolved by the ~16.7" beam (FWHM) of GISMO. Comparison to radio data at comparable spatial resolution enables us to confirm significant spatial variation of the spectral index between 21 cm and 2 mm. The main effect is a spectral flattening in the inner region of the Crab Nebula, correlated with the toroidal structure at the center of the nebula that is prominent in the near-IR through X-ray regime.
  • We report the detection of 158 micron [CII] fine-structure line emission from MIPS J142824.0+352619, a hyperluminous (L_IR ~ 10^13 L_sun) starburst galaxy at z=1.3. The line is bright, and corresponds to a fraction L_[CII]/L_FIR = 2 x 10^-3 of the far-IR (FIR) continuum. The [CII], CO, and FIR continuum emission may be modeled as arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs) that have a characteristic gas density of n ~ 10^4.2 cm^-3, and that are illuminated by a far-UV radiation field ~10^3.2 times more intense than the local interstellar radiation field. The mass in these PDRs accounts for approximately half of the molecular gas mass in this galaxy. The L_[CII]/L_FIR ratio is higher than observed in local ULIRGs or in the few high-redshift QSOs detected in [CII], but the L_[CII]/L_FIR and L_CO/L_FIR ratios are similar to the values seen in nearby starburst galaxies. This suggests that MIPS J142824.0+352619 is a scaled-up version of a starburst nucleus, with the burst extended over several kiloparsecs.
  • We have used the new 90GHz MUSTANG camera on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the bright Huygens region of the star-forming region M42 with a resolution of 9" and a sensitivity of 2.8mJy/beam. 90GHz is an interesting transition frequency, as MUSTANG detects both the free-free emission characteristic of the HII region created by the Trapezium stars, normally seen at lower frequencies, and thermal dust emission from the background OMC1 molecular cloud, normally mapped at higher frequencies. We also present similar data from the 150GHz GISMO camera taken on the IRAM telescope. This map has 15" resolution. By combining the MUSTANG data with 1.4, 8, and 21GHz radio data from the VLA and GBT, we derive a new estimate of the emission measure (EM) averaged electron temperature of Te = 11376K by an original method relating free-free emission intensities at optically thin and optically thick frequencies. Combining ISO-LWS data with our data, we derive a new estimate of the dust temperature and spectral emissivity index within the 80" ISO-LWS beam toward OrionKL/BN, Td = 42K and Beta=1.3. We show that both Td and Beta decrease when going from the HII region and excited OMC1 interface to the denser UV shielded part of OMC1 (OrionKL/BN, Orion S). With a model consisting of only free-free and thermal dust emission we are able to fit data taken at frequencies from 1.5GHz to 854GHz.
  • We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) line emission maps of the barred spiral active galaxy HE1029-1831 (z=0.0403) obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) and in part by the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) observatory. The CO emission is well associated with the optical bar and extended along it. The FWHM of the CO emission is estimated to be ~(6+-2)kpc. The CO emission shows a strong velocity gradient along the minor axis of the bar (PA=90degree). The molecular gas mass is estimated to be ~1.2x10^(10)Msun which indicates a very gas rich host galaxy. Most of the molecular gas appears to be subthermally excited and cold but we also find weak evidence for a warmer and/or denser gas component at the southern part of the bar emission, about \~4kpc from the galactic nucleus.
  • The paper presents an analysis of the nearby QSO host I Zw 1 based on new J-band imaging data, obtained with ISAAC at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). As one of the best-studied QSOs with exceptional properties lying between those of QSOs, narrow-line Seyfert 1s, and ultraluminous infrared galaxies, I Zw 1 is a prime candidate for a detailed case study of a QSO host. With its high angular resolution and sensitivity, the new J-band image provides strong evidence for an interaction between I Zw 1 and the western companion galaxy. We present a procedure for subtracting the QSO nucleus from the I Zw 1 image to obtain an undisturbed view on the underlying host galaxy. Based on the derived surface brightness profile and the gas rotation curve, the host is classified as a high-surface-brightness Freeman type I galaxy with a central disk surface brightness significantly larger than that of normal spirals. The surface-brightness profile is decomposed into a Plummer bulge and a Kuzmin disk with similar luminosities and a bulge-to-disk scale length ratio of 0.29, comparable to that of nearby spiral hosts with active galactic nuclei (AGN). Different models for the decomposition of the gas rotation curve are discussed. The resulting J-band mass-to-light ratio (M/L) of (0.7+/-0.4) M_sun/L_sun for the disk component suggests a mean solar-type stellar population with a tendency towards young stars. The bulge exhibits a lower M/L of 0.4+/-0.2 M_sun/L_sun, which supports previous findings of enhanced starburst activity in the nuclear and circumnuclear region.